Patience Sumpter1

F, #2505, b. before 1729, d. 1814

Family

James Suddarth b. 1720
Child
Last Edited7 Feb 2022
     
Who Was the Mother of Patience Sumpter?

     There is a family tradition about Elizabeth Patience which I am setting down, as I received it from a descendant, Terri Chesney. "Elizabeth had been a very beautiful young woman and was born about 1690 - 1695 in England, probably in London. Her family was very prominent and wealthy during the reign of Queen Anne. She was raised with the best education and training her family could provide and had beautiful clothes. She moved in the circles of the wealthy and important. Her family were religious, for years later, they sent her a book about being close to Jesus."

     "When Elizabeth was nineteen, she had a suitor that was interesting in marrying her and whom her family wished her to marry. She probably would have married him, had she not met a handsome man with whom she fell in love. He was a commoner and did not move in her circles and her family did everything possible to keep the two apart."

     "He decided to leave England to try and better himself in America. Elizabeth very much wanted to go with him. Her parents, afraid that she might try to leave with him, kept her under lock and key. One day, when they were out to dinner, she was left in the care of servants. Still locked in her room, Elizabeth talked one servant into helping her escape. The servant had given her word that she would not unlock the door, so Elizabeth threw her feather bed out the window. The servant put a few more feather beds with it and the desperate Elizabeth jumped from her window on the second story onto the feather bed."

     "She was not injured in the jump and it can be assumed that she had thrown a bag with a few possessions and whatever money she had saved down first. She lmet her love, they married and were soon on a ship to America. However, he became very ill at sea and died during the voyage. Elizabeth found herself suddenly alone, with no friends and no money with which to take care of herself. She found herself among sickly, poor people with rough manners."

     "She arrived in Virginia without anywhere to go and knowing no one to whom she could turn in her distress. The Captain of the ship introduced her to a friend of his who happened to be on the wharf area when the ship docked. His name was William Sumpter. He had arrived a few years previously, working off his passage for the family who had paid for his trip. He married Elizabeth and tried to take care of her."

     "The next few years were very hard for Elizabeth. She lived in a very small, rough log cabin. One of her children, a little boy whom she named Thomas, later grew up to become an important General in the American Revolution. When he was born, she is quoted as saying to the midwife who attended her, 'Oh, what will become of my poor son. I have nothing to put into his mouth (indicating she had no silver spoon). No way to care for him.' The midwife is said to have comforted her by telling her to put her trust in God who doesn't make children He can't take care of.'"

     "Elizabeth had five or six children and became known widely for her nursing skills among the women in the community. She was known for getting up in the middle of the night to help her neighbors no matter how cold or bad the weather. She later taught her only daughter, Patience, the same nursing skills. Both she and her daughter, Patience, were recommended by Thomas Jefferson to his daughter, Mrs. Eppes, for their nursing skills."

     "When she was very old, Elizabeth went to live with her daughter, Patience, and helped with her grand and great-grandchildren. She liked to gather them around her rocking chair, reading the Bible and telling stories to them. She often told them to obey their parents as her disobedience when she was young caused all her early troubles. When it came time for Elizabeth's earthly life to end, she awoke one morning very early and called to her daughter, 'Patience, the Master calls for me!' She died immediately after speaking these words. She was said to 111 years of age when she died."2

     None of this information about Elizabeth can be confirmed and, as far as I am concerned, is simply a fairy tale concocted down through the years by descendants romantizing her life. Whereas we do know that an Elizabeth Iverson/Iveson married a William Sumpter, this marriage is documented to have occurred in Cambridge, England in 1729, which does not "track" with Patience's history.

     However, in reading a series of letters from the descendants of Patience Sumpter Suddarth in 1873, a few bits and pieces of the above tale could be verified. The letters do name both of her husbands. One letter in particular, from Elizabeth Turner Suddarth, specifically confirms the fact that Patience's mother came on a ship from London on which her first husband died before their arrival.

     In all the letters from the grandchildren cited, Patience's parents did not marry until they reached the colonies. It is also known that they began having children c1720. Patience herself gave birth to her eldest child by her first husband c1740. Therefore, she had to be been born earlier than 1729. Her parents would have had to arrive in the Colonies well before that time. Consequently, her parents cannot be William Sumpter and Elizabeth Iverson/Iveson.3
     Patience Sumpter was born before 1729 in Virginia Colony. She was the sister of General Thomas Sumpter. Her mother sailed from London, but her mother's first husband died at sea. Her mother then married (--?--) Sumpter.4,5

     Wikipedia states that Thomas Sumter was born 14 Aug 1734 in Hanover County (citing "Thomas Sumter", Biographical Directory of the United States, United States Congress), with his father being William Sumter and his mother, Patience, a midwife (citing "Thomas Sumter", by Matthew A. Lockhart, South Carolina Encyclopedia, University of South Carolina - however I have found previous South Carolina encyclopedias to have significant errors of fact).

     Rev. Edgar Woods in his book states "A well founded tradition exists that General Sumter was born in Albemarle, and in the section referred to as the home of William and John (Sumter). It rests particularly on the testimony of Dr. Charles Brown, who was born just after the Revolution. The Doctor was acquainted with a sister of the General, Mrs. Martha Suddarth, the wife of William Suddarth, who lived and died in the county." Note that Martha Sumter's parentage is unknown at this time.6

     She first married John Benjamin Franklin (1713-1752) and had four daughters by him.7

     In studying the letters from her descendants in the Draper Manuscripts, I cannot find confirmation of William Franklin's birth/death information or the fact that there were children from this marriage.7,4

     Patience Sumpter married James Suddarth.4

     "She was a much loved and respected midwife in Albemarle County. Thomas Jefferson recommended her, as well as her mother, to his daughter, Mrs. Eppes, when she was sick."2
     This is entirely wrong! The letter from Thomas Jefferson to his daughter, Mrs. Eppes, was referring to Martha Sumter Suddarth, not Patience Sumpter as recounted by Rev. Edgar Woods in his book!6

     Patience Sumpter died in 1814 in Albemarle County, Virginia,7 and was buried on the family farm in Covesville, Albemarle County, Virginia.7

     She is also reported to have died in 1805.
     Find A Grave does not have a burial listing for her as of 10 May 2019.1

     On 15 December 1873, Wilson D. Turner, of Enon College, Trousdale County, Tennessee, wrote a letter to historian Lyman S. Draper in which he references his brother Samuel confirming Wilson to be another son of Terisha and Mary Dalton Turner. He mentions his great-grandmother Patience Sumpter who married a Suddarth and died in Albemarle County, Virginia.8

Citations

  1. [S254] Chesney, Terri, e-mail message from (e-mail address) to Toby Turner, entitled "Turner Family Research" dated 12 Oct 2000.
  2. [S254] Chesney. Email, dated 16 Oct 2000.
  3. [S1106] The Thomas Sumter Papers of the Draper Manuscript Collection; 973D, Series VV, 1-21. (Utica, Kentucky: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1986), accessed 30 Jan 2021, vol. 18, pages 266-267.
  4. [S1106] The Sumter Papers (Draper); accessed 30 Jan 2021, vol. 8, pages 355-366 and vol. 18, pages 266-275.
  5. [S1106] The Sumter Papers (Draper); accessed 30 Jan 2021, vol. 18, pages 266-267, citing a letter from Elizabeth Turner Suddarth of Cairo, Tennessee dated 18 Sep 1873 stating he was 56 years of age when he died in 1848.
  6. [S95] Woods, Rev. Edgar. Albemarle County in Virginia (1901; reprint Bowie: Heritage Books, 1989), page 323.
  7. [S5803] Historyman 1958. Sumter Family in "Re:[Sumpter] Sumpter Family Line", listserve message to [Sumpter] Sumpter family line, uploaded 27 Aug 2007, online https://lists.rootsweb.com/hyperkitty/list/sumpter.rootsweb.com/thread/29817868/, accessed 10 May 2019.
  8. [S1106] The Sumter Papers (Draper); accessed 30 Jan 2021, vol. 8, pages 365-366.

William Sumpter1

M, #5608, b. 1695, d. 1752

Family

Elizabeth Iverson/Iveson b. bt 1690 - 1695, d. c 1801
Last Edited9 Feb 2022
     
The Problem With William Sumpter and Elizabeth Iverson/Iveson

     According to the cited Draper manuscript, although many researchers name as Patience's parents, William Sumpter and Elizabeth Iverson/Iveson, this couple was married in Cambridge, England in 1729. A William Sumpter did leave a will in Louisa County, Vriginia Colony in 1752 in which he names a wife Elizabeth and sons John and William. So, this Louisa County William could be the father of Patience Sumpter, even though she is not named in his will. He also doesn't name Thomas Sumter in his will who is said to be Martha Sumter's (wife of William Suddarth) brother.

     However, in all the letters from the grandchildren cited, Patience's parents did not marry until they reached the colonies. It is also known that they began having children c1720. Patience herself gave birth to her eldest child by her first husband c1740. Therefore, she had to be been born earlier than 1729. Her parents would have had to arrive in the colonies well before that time. Consequently, her parents cannot be William Sumpter and Elizabeth Iverson/Iveson.2
     William Sumpter was born in 1695 in England.3

     William Sumpter married Elizabeth Iverson/Iveson in 1729 in Cambridge, England.4

     William Sumpter died in 1752 in Louisa County, Virginia Colony.
     Find A Grave does not have a burial listing for him as of 10 May 2019.3

Citations

  1. [S254] Chesney, Terri, e-mail message from (e-mail address) to Toby Turner, entitled "Turner Family Research" dated 16 Oct 2000.
  2. [S1106] The Thomas Sumter Papers of the Draper Manuscript Collection; 973D, Series VV, 1-21. (Utica, Kentucky: State Historical Society of Wisconsin, 1986), accessed 30 Jan 2021, vol. 8, pages 355-366 and vol. 18, pages 266-275.
  3. [S5803] Historyman 1958. Sumter Family in "Re:[Sumpter] Sumpter Family Line", listserve message to [Sumpter] Sumpter family line, uploaded 27 Aug 2007, online https://lists.rootsweb.com/hyperkitty/list/sumpter.rootsweb.com/thread/29817868/, accessed 10 May 2019.
  4. [S5803] Historyman 1958. Sumter Family in "Sumpter Family," listserve message 27 Aug 2007. They did not marry in the Virginia Colony as this source states, but there is a marriage record for them in England.

Arena Sweatt1

F, #24589, b. 25 November 1837, d. 5 November 1876
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)

Family

Napoleon Winfield London b. 12 Sep 1831, d. 21 Feb 1913
Children
Last Edited29 Dec 2016
     Arena Sweatt was born on 25 November 1837. She was the daughter of Azariah and Finetta (Phillips) Sweatt of Butler County, Kentucky.1,2

     Arena Sweatt married Napoleon Winfield London, son of Martin London and Nancy R. Eades.1

     Arena London died on 5 November 1876 at age 38 in Butler County, Kentucky,1,2 and was buried in Tyree London Cemetery, Turnertown, Butler County, Kentucky.3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1860as Ir?ne and 23 years of ageButler County, Kentucky4
1870as Arena and 35 years of age2nd Precinct, Butler County, Kentucky5

Citations

  1. [S5595] Battle, J. H., Perrin, W.H. and Kniffin, G.C.. Kentucky - A History Of The State, Embracing A Concise Account Of The Origin And Development Of The Virginia Colony; Its Expansion Westward, And The Settlement Of The Frontier Beyond The Alleghanies; The Erection Of Kentucky As An Independent State, And Its Subsequent Development (Louisville and Chicago: F. A. Battey Publishing Company, 1885), page 665.
  2. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 28 Dec 2016, memorial page for Arena "Rena" Sweatt London (1837-1876) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Silbert Hartis, maintained by Silbert Hartis; citing Tyree London Cemetery, Turnertown, Butler County, Kentucky.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for Arena "Rena" Sweatt London (1837-1876) at memorial page....
  4. [S5507] "United States Census, 1860," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MZ1S-J7N ), entry for N W London, 1860, Butler, Kentucky, United States; citing page 59, household 112, NARA microfilm publication M653 (Washington, D. C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL Film 803,358, accessed 28 Dec 2016.
  5. [S5500] "United States Census, 1870," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MX7L-H1V ), entry for Winfield London, 1870, Precinct 2, Butler, Kentucky, United States; citing p. 12, family 85, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 545,950, accessed 29 Dec 2016.

James Benjamin Sweatt1,2

M, #24603, b. 23 July 1874, d. 19 May 1950

Family

Cleopatra London b. May 1870, d. 12 Nov 1952
Last Edited23 Sep 2019
     James Benjamin Sweatt was born on 23 July 1874 in Butler County, Kentucky. He was the son of James L Sweatt (1834-1901) and Sarah Susan Moore Sweatt (1838-1896.)2

     James Benjamin Sweatt and Cleopatra London obtained a marriage license on 19 March 1895 in Butler County, Kentucky.3

     James Benjamin Sweatt, 20, married Cleopatra London, 24, daughter of Napoleon Winfield London and Arena Sweatt, on 20 March 1895 in Butler County, Kentucky.3

     James Benjamin Sweatt died on 19 May 1950 at age 75 in Lewisburg, Logan County, Kentucky,2 and was buried in Lewisburg Cemetery, Lewisburg, Logan County, Kentucky.2

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1900unable to find him

Citations

  1. [S5537] "Kentucky, County Marriages, 1797-1954," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2Q8-THTK, entry for J. B. Sweat and C. Patie London, 20 Mar 1895; citing , Butler, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 928,054, accessed 29 Dec 2016). Although the clerk spelled his surname Sweat, the family in that part of Kentucky spelled it Sweatt.
  2. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 30 Dec 2018, memorial page for James Benjamin Sweatt (1874-1950)|K. Lawson at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Our Ancestors Branches, maintained by 180654055.
  3. [S5537] "KY County Marriages, 1797-1954," The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2Q8-THTK, J. B. Sweat and C. Patie London, 20 Mar 1895; citing , Butler, Kentucky, United States, Madison County Courthouse, Richmond; FHL microfilm 928,054, accessed 29 Dec 2016).

Alvin Curtis Swinburn1,2

M, #258, b. 15 November 1845, d. 11 May 1920
FatherEdwin N. Swinburne3 b. 13 Sep 1813, d. 9 Sep 1905
MotherMartha Ann O'Neal2 b. 15 Dec 1829, d. 18 Dec 1899
A. C. and Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert Swiniburn (seated)
Left to right: Matthew, Eula, Oscar, and Vinnie
(photo courtesy of Joy Turner Luke)

Family

Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert b. 15 Oct 1848, d. 5 Dec 1927
Child
Last Edited30 Apr 2022
     Alvin Curtis Swinburn was born on 15 November 1845, son of Edwin N. Swinburne and Martha Ann O'Neal, in Salem, Marion County, Illinois. His death certificate says he was born in Tennessee (as it states was his father which we know to be incorrect), and gives his mother's maiden name as Jones, also born in Tennessee. I believe this is in error. The informant was Oscar Swinburn who has given incorrect information in the past.4,5,6,7
     He was also known as Alva C. Swinburn.

     In various documents, his name is reported as Alva C., and in others, Alvin C. His name is shown as Alvin on the 1860 census. I was always told the middle name was Charles, but the documents that list his middle name and his tombstone, state it to have been Curtis. Apparently, he was called Alva by his father and, perhaps, by his family as well.

     Alvin Curtis Swinburn was educated in 1858 where his name is on the list of students, along with his brother, John, and his sister, Jemima.8

     Alva began military service on 1 February 1862 by enlisting in Company H, 4th Regiment, Texas Cavalry at the age of 17. He later served in Company A, Texas 17th Calvary, as well as in Arnold's Company as a Texas Infantry Rifleman.

     In the compiled service records of Texas Confederate soldiers, Alva is shown as being enrolled in Company A, 17th Texas Cavalry, Moore's Regiment at age 17 by T. J. Johnson. He mustered at Camp Likins on 12 Mar 1862 for a period of 12 months. The number of miles to the rendezvous point was 70. His horse was valued at $170 and his personal equipment at $25. He is shown on the company muster roll from Feb to 30 Jun 1862. 9

     In his own words, Alva says:
          "(I) enlisted in the Confederate Army at Nacogdoches, Tex., as private in Company A, Seventeenth Texas Cavalry (Consolidated), Polignac's Brigade, Mouton's Division. My first Captain was Hancock, and first Colonel, Taylor."10

     He performed his Military Service after 1 February 1862 as a Rifleman in Arnold's Company, Texas Infantry and in Company A, Texas 17th Cavalry.

     Because he was in service with his father some of the time, I've not found any letters from him. However, I found a letter in an unpublished collection from Laurence Taylor to his father, Chas. S. Taylor, dated July 18, 1862 in which he mentions Alva. Because the letter paint a compelling portrait of the difficulties of serving in the Confederacy, I've decided to reproduce it in its entirety:

"Letter from Laurence Taylor to Chas. S. Taylor, July l2, 1862.
     Little Rock, Ark., July 18th, 1862.
     Dear Pa:

          I wrote to Amelia yesterday but haven't had. an opportunity to mail it yet. I have been looking very anxiously for some time for a letter from home, (but nary letter yet I have seen the Elephant at last. In the last 8 weeks I have undergone hardships and privations as many as a person of my weak constitution and retired habits can well bear up under. During the whole time there hasn't been 3 days that we eat three meals a day. I am so used to it now that one good meal a day is as much as I care for. When I had any money I could. do very well, then I could buy. On the 13th inst. we was dismounted and our horses were sent home by a detail of 5 men from each company; mine & Henry's will be sent by the nonconscripts. Swinburn is going to take mine. A great many of Boys of the Brigade are deserting, and I don't blame them a bit, for we are treated worse than negroes (sic). We are allowed no privileges at all. Gen. Hindman made a speech yesterday to the boys, and in his speech he said that he learned that some of the soldiers had been stealing Roasting Ears that had to be stopped, and he would make it his business to stop it, and if he heard or saw any soldier with Roasting Ears he would have him hung if he had to do it with his own hands, and he said he would allow no soldier to buy none. I am happy to say that his orders concerning the corn is not respected; they buy and steal them every chance.

     July 20th.
          We left camp at Little Rock yesterday at 8 o'clock, and marched 20 miles without anything to eat, and through the hot sun, and some without water. Bill Hooks of our Company fainted, and one man in the Brigade fell in the road perfectly senseless. He was thought to be sun-struck. When we left camps we were told we had only to go 8 miles up the river, but I found it to be a rather lengthy 8 miles. I got into camp about sun-down as near broke down as I ever want to be again. Some of the Regiment didn't get up during the night. Such long marches and through the hot sun will certainly make us sick. At our present encampment I think, from the preparations, we will remain here some time. We are having wells dug and are going to build a Hospital. We will begin clearing off the drill ground in the morning. We will smell thunder; I think I kinder smelt it yesterday about 12 o'clock.

          On the 7th inst. we had another fight, but it didn't terminate as our other fights did; all the running was on our side. Our Regiment didn't get into it. I would rather have been in the fight than to have done the rapid marching we did do. Our Regiment came very near being cut off; we only missed it by a few minutes. We got to White river about 8 o'clock in the night; it then took us until day to swim all our horses. We couldn't think of ferrying them and 20,000 Yankees after us. None but 3 regiments of our brigade was in the fight, and they held their ground very well against such odds. I acted as Sergeant Major on the day of the fight, and the Col. was so well pleased with me that he appointed me the next day, but since we have been dismounted, I requested the Col. to confer the honor upon somebody else. The duties of the office are too fatiguing. I never had any rest hardly, neither night nor day, and it's a very unpleasant position. You are cursed by everybody. I had the guard to detail. The first guard I detailed, me and an Orderly Sergeant came near fighting.
               I have been very busy today writing discharges; about half of our company are being discharged. The Conscrip exempts Public Millers; you may look for me in a few days (over the left.) You all must write oftener. I haven't received a letter from home in a month.

          I am going to send my pony by Alva Swinburn. Tell William he had better give over the idea of joining the Army.

     Your son,
     Laurence."11

     On July 27, 1966, someone requested a photocopy of Alva C. Swinborn's papers, receipt No. 21815. The following is a true copy of the photocopy:

     I CERTIFY, That the within named Alva C. Swinburn a private of Captain Sebron M. Nobles Company A of the 17th regiment of Texas Cavalry, born in Posy County, in the State of Indiana, aged 17 years, 5 feet, 4 inches high, fair complexion, blue eyes, light hair, and by occupation a Bricklayer was enlisted by Capt. Theo(?) I (?) Johnson at Nacogdoches Texas on the 1st day of February 1862, to serve one year, and is now entitled to discharge by reason of (word illegible but might be Conscrip-something) He being under eighteen years of age.

     The said Alva C. Swinburn was last paid by Capt. J. Field, to include the 30th day of June 186?, and has pay due from that date to the present date.

     There is due to him forty-five Dollars traveling allowance from Little Rock, Arkansas, the place of discharge to Nacogdoches Texas, the place of enrollment, transportation not being furnished in kind.

     There is due him for services fourteen 16/100 dollars.

     He is indebted to the Confederate States (line left blank) dollars on account of (line left black).

     Given in duplicate at Little Rock, this 17th day of July, 1862.
               J. B. G(illegible)            S. N. Nobles
               (Illegible) 17th Regt. Texas (illegible) Cavalry

     For pay from 1st of July 1862, to 17th of July (illegible) 1862, being 17 days at Twenty five dollars per month,
For pay for travelling from Little Rock Ark to Nacogdoches Texas, being 350 miles, at ten cents per mile, and 40 cts for each 20 miles.

     [The sums were totaled on the right side of the page 14.16 plus 42.00 = $56.16

Received of Capt. Julian Fuldagm C. S. Army this 10th day of August 1862, Fifty Six dollars, and 16 cents, in full of the above amount.
                    (Signed duplicates)            Alva C. Swinburn
               Witness           S. M. Nobles (illegible).12

     On 5 May 1862, Company C was at Bossier Parish, Louisiana.13

     On 29 May 1862, Company C was at Holly Springs, Dallas County, Arkansas.14

     On 4 June 1862, Company C was at Austin, Travis County, Texas. On the 10th, they were at Searcy and on the 16th in Van Buren County, Arkansas.15

     On 1 July 1862, Company C was back at Searcy, White County, Arkansas,and on the 29th, they were at Crystal Hill, 12 miles north of Little Rock.16

     On 4 August 1862, they were at Camp Crystal, Arkansas, as they were on the 11th. On the 29th, Company C was at Camp Hope Arkansas.17

     On 19 August 1862, "Voucher #165
          Paid 19th day Aug 1862
          Pvt. Alva C. Swinburn
          Co. A, 17th Regiment Texas Cavalry
          From 1st day July 1862
          To 19th day July 1862
          Pay $56.16
          Forage
          Account $56.16.18

     On 29 August 1862, Company C was encamped at Camp Nelson, Arkansas.19 Captain Marsh wrote his wife that no men from Company C were lost until October 16th, when B. F. Massy was killed.20

     On 1 December 1862, Company C was encamped at Arkansas Post, after leaving 10 to 12 men at Camp Nelson who were too sick to travel.20 Captain Marsh wrote his wife on the 10th and again on the 21st when he reported that four men from Company C had died.21

     On 9 January 1863, the Battle of Arkansas Post, also known as the Battle of Fort Hindman, began. This was a Civil War battle fought January 9–11, 1863, as Union troops under Major General John A. McClernand sought to stop Confederate harassment of Union shipping on the Arkansas River and possibly to mount an offensive against the Arkansas capital at Little Rock (Pulaski County).

     In the fall of 1862, Confederate officials ordered construction of fortifications on the Arkansas River. They selected high ground at a horseshoe bend in the river near the territorial-era village of Arkansas Post (Arkansas County) and constructed a large, square, heavily armed fortification. It was called Post of Arkansas by Confederates and Fort Hindman by the Union side. Brigadier General Thomas J. Churchill assumed command of the Post of Arkansas in December. In late December, Rebel troops captured the steamer the Blue Wing on the Mississippi River and sent it and its cargo of armaments to Churchill’s garrison at Arkansas Post.

     Meanwhile, Major General John A. McClernand, an Illinois politician turned soldier, assumed command of a Union expeditionary force under Major General William T. Sherman, which had just suffered a repulse at Chickasaw Bluffs, Mississippi. McClernand, having heard of the capture of the Blue Wing, determined to use these troops and a flotilla of Union warships under Rear Admiral David D. Porter to attack Fort Hindman to protect the shipping and lines of communications of the Union army.

     Despite the Union forces starting their trip on the Arkansas River by way of the White River Cutoff to avoid discovery by the Confederates, the Rebels were aware of the Union flotilla by the afternoon of January 9, 1863. Churchill ordered troops to a line of rifle pits about two miles north of Fort Hindman to hinder the Union advance. McClernand landed troops at Nortrebe’s Plantation on the north bank of the river about three miles south of the Post of Arkansas and other Union troops on the south side of the Arkansas River.

     Thousands of Union troops had disembarked at Nortrebe’s Plantation by 11:00 a.m. on January 10 and begun advancing toward Fort Hindman. Churchill ordered his forward units to fall back to the Post of Arkansas at 2:00 p.m. The Confederate position was anchored by the fort on the banks of the Arkansas River. The position was supported by a line of rifle pits west of Fort Hindman that ended near the Post Bayou, which helped prevent a flanking movement against the Confederate left. Most of the Texas and Arkansas troops under Churchill’s command occupied the rifle pits as the Union troops reached their assault positions at about 5:30 p.m. Union gunboats led by the ironclads the Baron DeKalb, the Louisville, and the Cincinnati then moved against Fort Hindman, hammering the fort’s big guns and killing most of the Confederate artillery’s horses in and around the fort. By the time the naval bombardment was complete, it was too dark for the Union army to attack. Union troops spent the night listening to the Confederates chopping down trees to strengthen their defensive positions.

     McClernand and his commanders spent the morning of January 11 arranging the 32,000 soldiers of the Army of the Mississippi for an assault against the strengthened bulwarks shielding the 4,900-man garrison of the Post of Arkansas. At 1:00 p.m., Porter again advanced the Union gunboats against Fort Hindman. He was aided by Union artillery that had been landed on the south side of the river and moved to where it could sweep the fort with artillery fire from across the Arkansas River. By 4:00 p.m., the guns of Fort Hindman were silenced.

     The Union infantry, meanwhile, had moved up against the Confederate lines. Troops on the Union right were fiercely engaged with the Arkansas and Texas troops defending the rifle pits. Other Union troops in the army’s center advanced against the Texans immediately west of the fort and engaged in a firefight that caused more than one-third of the Union’s losses. At about 4:30 p.m., as McClernand prepared to order a final, massive assault on the defenders of the Post of Arkansas, white flags appeared along the Confederate lines. Though Churchill denied issuing orders to give up and many of the Texans were fiercely resistant to capitulation, the garrison of Fort Hindman surrendered to McClernand’s army. Federal casualties were reported as 134 killed, 898 wounded, and 29 missing; incomplete Confederate reports showed 60 killed and 80 wounded, with 4,791 of the garrison captured.

     The Rebel prisoners were loaded onto transports and sent up the Mississippi River to prison camps on January 12. McClernand’s troops razed Fort Hindman and gathered the spoils of the Confederate garrison, including many of the armaments that had been captured on the Blue Wing. McClernand ordered a sortie up the Arkansas River to South Bend, Arkansas, to destroy stores of corn accessible to Confederates. On January 14, he sent a memorandum to Sherman and Porter stating that he planned to move up the river against Little Rock (Pulaski County) and other Rebel concentrations in central Arkansas. General Ulysses S. Grant, however, countermanded the plan and ordered the Army of the Mississippi to rejoin the main Union offensive against Vicksburg, Mississippi.

     The defeat at Arkansas Post cost Confederate Arkansas fully one-fourth of its armed forces in the largest surrender of Rebel troops west of the Mississippi River prior to the final capitulation of the Confederates in 1865. While the victory there did not have a major impact on the Union’s drive to take Vicksburg, it did ease the movement of Union shipping on the Mississippi and raise the morale of the Yankee troops after their rough handling at Chickasaw Bluffs.22

     A. C. Swinburn, in his own words, describes what happened to him at this battle:
           "At the battle of Arkansas Post I belonged to Deshler's Brigade, Churchill's Division, and was detailed with Hart's Battery. Nearly all our army was captured in that battle, but as nearly all my company had a chance to escape, we did so."23

     On 5 May 1863, the men who had been captured and held in prison were released in Petersburg, Virginia.24 On the 20th, Marsh wrote his wife reported that nearly one-third of the regiment was dead. Furthermore, he said that one-half of those who died were either shot or hung in retaliation. He was now in command of the 17th regiment. Of the 313 men who were captured at the fall of the fort, 111 died. Company C had fourteen menwho died in captivity. Five men were left at Camp Douglas because they were too ill to travel.25

     On 14 June 1863, Marsh reported from Tulahoma, Tennessee that the 17th Texas Cavalry Regiment died on May 23 when it was consolidated with the 18th, 24th, and 25th Texas Cavalries. He was allowed to keep his old company (Company C). He also reported that the boys left at Camp Douglas were now with them. He said ". . . . most of the boys that escaped at the Post were of little credit to them selves. Some of them run wors (sic) then scared dogs whilst the fight was goin (sic) on."2627

     On 8 April 1864, "I [meaning A. C. Swinburn] was in the battles of Mansfield, Pleasant Hill (9 Apr) and Yellow Bayou. My Captain was killed at Mansfield, and dark came on us in that hole and I got lost from my command, and in hunting my way out I found a Union soldier and he wanted me to carry him out, and I told him that I would not do it, but would leave him my canteen of water and some bread and meat, and left him and found my company at 12 o'clock that night, and was telling some of my company what I had found. I did not believe he woudl ever be found, as the country was rough and full of bushes. Next morning we followed up our victory, fought the battle of Pleasant Hill and gained a second victory. We followed the enemy and were gone some two weeks. When we returned we heard of someone being found that had lain on the battlefield for ten days and his chances for recovery were good, and that was the last we ever heard of him. Several years ago ther was a man advertised in the Dallas News trying to find the man who gave him the bread and water at the battle of Mansfield, but I did not get his address, and would like to know it now, so that I might correspond with him."23

(To read about the battle, click The Battle of Mansfield)

(To read about the battle, click The Battle of Pleasant Hill)

     Alvin Curtis Swinburn and Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert obtained a marriage license on 26 December 1868 in Nacogdoches County, Texas.28 Alva C. Swinburn, 23, married Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert, 20, daughter of Floyd Jackson Gilbert and Nancy Ann Sparkman, on 15 January 1869 at Nacogdoches County, Texas, in a ceremony was performed by J. S. Lambert.29,30,31

     In October 1884, he moved his family to Henrietta, Wilbarger County, Texas. At that time he was a brick contractor.

     "He not only has the distinction of making the first brick in this county, but assisted in the construction of a number of Vernon's first brick buildings. Among the brick structures was the county's first brick jail (1885) and its first brick court house, which was built in 1886. He also built a brick jail at Margaret, Texas, in the early days when that town was recognized as the county seat of Hardeman County."32

     On 30 April 1886, "Henrietta: . . . A. C. Swinburn left on Friday (the 30th) with his family to make his home at Vernon, in the free State of Wilbarger, where, with his partners, he has the contract for the $85,900 courthouse."33

     In 1895, he lived at Tolbert, Wilbarger County, Texas, which is eight miles northwest of Vernon off Highway 287.

     The Tolbert Methodist Church was organized by Rev. S. W. Turner on April 10, 1892. The charter members of the church included: Dora A. Turner, S. W. Turner, W. F. Turner, Neal Waskom Turner, H. A. Turner, Eula Swinburn, Mrs. N. E. (E. N. ?) Swinburn. Obviously, this is where Eula met her future husband (they were married two years later). [Unfortunately, I cannot find my source for this.]

     On 10 October 1901, A. C. Swinburn, of Vernon, was one of the forty-six men whose discharges in bankruptcy were granted.34

     Jessie Swinburn Drennan also remembers that A. C. had a fine reputation in Vernon. He was particularly noted for his dependability.

     Elisabeth Turner Alford says her family went every year for Christmas to the senior Swinburn's home in Vernon.35

     His death certificate stated he had lived at his residence for 35 years, was under the doctor's care from April 1 through the date of his death and that at time of his death was 74 years, 5 months and 26 days old.

     Oscar Swinburn, his son, was the informant who incorrectly said his mother's maiden name was Jones and she was born in Tennessee. He said his father was also born in Tennessee.6

     Alva C. Swinburn died of Cebral (sic) atrophy with Hypostatic Penumonia with a contributory factor of Influenza on 11 May 1920 at age 74 in Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas,6,36 and was buried on 12 May 1920 in Eastview Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas. A.C. SWINBURN LAID TO REST BY FELLOW PIONEERS - DECEASED KNOWN FOR RECORD IN WAR BETWEEN STATES AND REPUTATION AS BUILDER OF LARGE NUMBER OF PUBLIC STRUCTURES THROUGHOUT THIS SECTION OF STATE - MANY AT FUNERAL

     A. C. Swinburn pioneer - of this community, died at the family residence after a long and lingering illness, Thursday, May 12 (or 11 ?), at the age of 74 (?), 5 months and 226 days.

     Mr. Swinburn was born in Salem, Illinois November 15 and . . . moved to Texas with his family as a child.

     He enlisted in the Confederate Army at Nacogdoches under _________Hancock; Polignac Division and served with honor and distinction through the four long years of the Civil War. Mr. Swinburn participated in the Battle of Manassas and other major engagements of the war.

     It is reported of Mr. Swinburn that on the battlefield he once gave an enemy wounded and in a dying condition his canteen of water and his supply of hardtack. Years later, this man advertised in the Dallas News to find Mr. Swinburn.

SURVIVED BY FOUR CHILDREN

     In _____ he was married to Miss Elizabeth Gilbert at Nacogdoches with whom he lived happily until the time of his death. To this union were born six children, two dying in infancy. The four surviving children, Oscar S. of Vernon, Matt S. of Tolbert and Mrs. Eula Turner and Mrs. W. F. Martin of Wichita Falls were present at the funeral. The fourteen grandchildren of the deceased, a brother Sidney Swinburn and his son of Mexia and W. F. Martin, a son-in-law were also present.

     Mr. Swinburn accompanied by his eldest son, Oscar, arrived in Vernon in 1884 where they installed the first brickyard, located just south of the W. M. McCaleb home. The equipment for this yard was hauled overland from Henrietta and the fuel burned in this plant was wood hauled from Beaver creek (sic). From this first brick in 1885 the first jail was erected. In 1886 Mr. Swinburn moved his family to this county from Henrietta and the same year laid the cornerstone for the court house which he completed with his associates Strain & Iristey (?), a year or two later.

BUILT MANY BUILDINGS

     This contractor built the first brick opera house which was situated on the east side of the square and was destroyed sometime later by fire. The Masonic Temple, the HAL(?)M Store Building, the Renfro Bricks, and other buildings here were his handiwork.

     In the last years of his contracting work he was associated with the late John White of this city and they built court houses and jails at Paducah, Wellington, Clarendon, Memphis, Henrietta, Mangun, Oklahoma, and all over the Panhandle country. He also filled large contracts for the railroads at Jacksboro in bridges and erected the courthouse at that place.

     The funeral services Wednesday afternoon were conducted at his home by Rev. E. R. Barcus of the First Methodist Church assisted by Rev. S. T. Bradbury of the Central Christian Church. The active pallbearers were: T. P. Liuman, John Reese, E. P. Robertson, W. R. Martin, J. D. Summerour and Ed Swim. The honorary pallbearers were his old comrades in arms from Camp Cabell U.C.V. The remains were laid to rest in East View Cemetery.

     In respect to his memory, the Commissioner's Court adjourned their sitting until after the funeral."37

     Another obituary ran in The Confederate Veteran Magazine:
               "A.C. Swinburne, pioneer building contractor of Vernon, Tex., died at his home there on May 11, aged seventy-four years. He was born in Salem, Ill., on November 15, 1845, and went with his parents to Texas when a child. He served in the Confederate army under Captain Hancock, Polignac's Division, and served with honor and distinction during the four years of war. He took part in the battle of Manassas and other major engagements of his command. It is told of him that on the battle field he once gave a wounded enemy, supposedly in dying condition, his canteen of water, and years after this man advertised in the Dallas News to find him.

          In 1869 Comrade Swinburne was married to Miss Elizabeth Gilbert, of Nacogdoches, with whom he lived happily until his death. To them were born six children, two sons and two daughters surviving him.

          In 1884 he and his eldest son installed the first brickyard in Vernon, and from the first brick produced the first jail was (sic) erected in 1885; and as a contractor and builder he erected some of the most important buildings of the town in the years following, also filling large contracts with the railroads for bridges, etc.
     
          He was laid to rest in Eastview Cemetery, his old comrades of Camp Cabell, U.C.V., acting as honorary pallbearers."

     With respect to the Union soldier advertising in the Dallas Morning News: Jesse Elizabeth Swinburne Drennan (A.C.'s granddaughter) told me that A. C. went immediately to the newspaper to try to contact the former Union soldier. Amazingly enough, the newspaper had not taken down an address, nor had the man given one in his advertisement. Therefore, A. C. was never able to contact the man who advertised trying to locate him. What a shame!38,6,39

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1850as Alva C. and 4 years of ageLynn Township, Posey County, Indiana2
1860as Alvin C. and 13 years of ageNacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas40
1867as having been in the county for 13 yearsNacogdoches County, Texas41
187024 years of age and living immediately adjacent to his fatherNacogdoches PO, Nacogdoches County, Texas42
Brick Mason42
188034 years of age, but is not found in indices. There are four boarders listed in his household: John Brennan, age 37; James Ahinan, age 47; Denis H34 years of age, but is not found in indices. There are four boarders listed in his household: John Brennan, age 37; James Ahinan, age 47; Denis H[M]etly, age 47 and Pat Obrian, age 45. All of these men were railroad workersetly, age 47 and Pat Obrian, age 45. All of these men were railroad workersSpringfield & Tehuacana Precincts, Limestone County, Texas43
Brick Mason43
190054 years of age. His wife and daughter, Vinnie, were living in his household as were his son Matt S. and Matt's wife. In addition, he lived immediately adjacent to his son, Oscar A. and his family. Alva reported having been married for 30 yearsJustice Precinct 6, Wilbarger County, Texas44
Brick Mason who reported being out of work for 6 months, but who owned his farm free of mortgage44
191065 years of age, although his surname is spelled Swimburne and married for forty-one yearsVernon, Wilbarger County, Texas45
Brick Layer (House) who owns his home free of mortgage45
192074 years of ageVernon, Wilbarger County, Texas46
Bricklayer who works on salary and own his home free of mortgage46

Citations

  1. [S576] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, editor, The People of Nacogdoches County in 1860 - An Edited Census, 1978), page 7.
  2. [S961] "1850 United States Federal Census," Posey County, Indiana, population schedule, Lynn Township, dwelling 790, family 790, Edwin Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm M432, Roll 166, page 221B, Image 20. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S657] Swinburn, E. N., Will of E. N. Swinburn, Book L, Case No. 1214, pages 431-434 N75, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas.
  4. [S792] Anonymous, "Obituary of Alva C. Swinburn," The Confederate Veterans Magazine, January 1920 - December 1920, XXVIII (1987, 1988): page 307.
  5. [S596] Alva C. Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcribed from tombstone, 15 Oct 1999, East View Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas.
  6. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JFZF-NRX : accessed 17 Dec 2012), A. C. Swinburn, 11 May 1920; citing Vernon, Wilbarger, Texas, reference cn 18278, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,073,788.
  7. [S6009] "Texas, Death Certificates, 1903-1982," index and images, (Ancestry.com: (Provo, Utah), accessed 30 Apr 2022, entry for A. C. Swinburn, 11 May 1920, Wilbarger County, Stamped 18278; citing original data from the Texas State Board of Health.
  8. [S779] "Old Nacogdoches University Rosters - Students and Instructors", contributed by Peggy Price, online at https://sites.rootsweb.com/~txnacogd/schools/oub_rosters1858.htm , uploaded 10 Apr 2001, website address verified 10 Jun 2019, accessed on 10 May 2004.
  9. [S1427] Alva C. Swinburn, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organization from Texas - 17th (Consolidated) Dismounted Cavalry (n.p.: n.pub.), Record Group unknown record group, Roll Microcopy 323, Roll #96; digitized and made available by unknown agency, unknown url, a copy of this record is in my possession.
  10. [S2381] Yeary, Mamie, compiler. Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865 (Dallas, Texas: Smith & Lamar, 1912), page, 737.
  11. [S1788] Letters from Laurence Taylor to his father, Charles Taylor, Letters, 12-18 July, 1862, XLII, East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas, pages 87-89.
  12. [S791] Veteran Service Records, Military Service Records of Swinborn, Alva C. (Washington, D. C.: National Archives and Records Service), Record Group unknown record group; digitized and made available by unknown agency, unknown url.
  13. [S1772] Marsh, Bryan. "The Confederate Letters of Bryan Marsh," Chronicles of Smith County, Texas, vol. 14, no. 2 (Winter, 1975): page 10. Bryan Marsh enlisted in 1861 and was promoted to captain of Company C, 17th Texas Cavalry Regiment. Although he was promoted to colonel after the consolidation, he continued to keep up with the members of his old company. He was sheriff in Smith County for 20 years and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Tyler, Texas.
  14. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 10-11.
  15. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 11-13.
  16. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 13-15.
  17. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 15-17.
  18. [S1427] Alva C. Swinburn, Alva C. Swinburn's Service Recds..
  19. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 17-18.
  20. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 19-20.
  21. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 20-21.
  22. [S1773] Christ, Mark K.. "The Encyclopedia of Arkansas: Battle of Arkansas Post", online at https://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/entries/battle-of-arkansas-post-525/ , website address verified 3 Jul 2019.
  23. [S2381] Yeary. Reminiscences of Boys in Gray, page 737.
  24. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 22.
  25. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 23.
  26. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 24.
  27. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 25.
  28. [S2455] Mullins, Marion Day, compiler. Early Texas Marriage Records, 1837-1905 (Fort Worth: Fort Worth Genealogical Society, n.d.), Nacogdoches Records, page 39, copied from courthouse records, 1949.
  29. [S578] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, The People of Nacogdoches County in the Civil War, 1980), page 249.
  30. [S1072] Murrie, Pauline Shirley. Marriage Records of Nacogdoches County, Texas, 1824-1881 (Houston, Texas: P. S. Murrie, 1968), page 74, provides name of officiant.
  31. [S2586] "Texas Marriages, 1837-1973," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXQK-Z2G, entry for Alvin C. Swinburn and W. E. Gilbert, 15 Jan 1869; citing , Nacogdoches, Texas, , reference 2:JRTJRV; FHL microfilm 25,312, accessed 6 Apr 2011).
  32. [S465] Ross, Charles P. and Rouse, T. L.. Official Early-Day History of Wilbarger County (Vernon, Texas: The Vernon Daily Record, 1973), page 151.
  33. [S1961] "DELAYED SOCIETY NOTES - Henrietta," Dallas Morning News, Texas, 4 May 1886, page 5, A. C. Swinburn.
  34. [S1958] "FORTY-SIX MADE HAPPY. Discharges in Bankruptcy Granted by Federal Judge Meek," Fort Worth Morning Register, Texas, 10 Oct 1901, page 8, A. C. Swinburn.
  35. [S875] Interview with Elisabeth Turner Alford (Wichita Falls, Texas), by Toby Turner, October 13-14, 1999. Library of Toby Turner (Houston, Harris County, Texas).
  36. [S6009] "TX Death Cert., 1903-1982," index and images, Ancestry.com, entry for A. C. Swinburn, 11 May 1920, Wilbarger County, Stamped 18278. Oscar Swinburn was the informant who stated A. C.'s mother's surname was Jones which we know to be incorrect.
  37. [S1807] A.C. Swinburn Laid to Rest, Vernon Daily Record, Right Hand Column, ? May 1920, Front Page, on microfilm.
  38. [S596] Alva C. Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcribed from tombstone, East View Memorial Park,, Block 3, Lot 61, Grave 7.
  39. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 3 Jan 2019, memorial page for Alva Curtis Swinburn (1845-1920) at memorial page... Maintained by Toby, originally created by Tamera; citing Eastview Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas.
  40. [S68] "1860 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, Beat No. 1 A Township, dwelling 60, family 60, E N Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm M653, Roll 1301, page 120B. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  41. [S280] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves. Nacogdoches--Gateway to Texas : a biographical directory, II (Fort Worth: Arrow/Curtis Print. Co., 1974), page 391.
  42. [S672] "1870 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, 1st District Township, dwelling 116, family 116, Alvin C Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm M593, Roll 1599, page 429B. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online,. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  43. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, Enumeration District (ED) 95, Sheet 14, dwelling 109, family 117, A. C Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T9, Roll 1317, page 376B. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  44. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 132, Sheet 4, dwelling 63, family 65, Alva C. Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T623, Roll 1679, page 302A. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  45. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 237, Sheet 7A, dwelling 122, family 124, Alva Swimburne household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T624, Roll 1597, page 127A if using name search and 127B if using roll and page number search. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  46. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Vernon Township, Enumeration District (ED) 196, Sheet 10B, dwelling 173, family 222, Alva C Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T625, Roll 1855, page 154B if using name search and 154C if using roll and page number search. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  47. [S677] "1880 U. S. Census," Limestone County, Texas, pop. sch., Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, ED 95, Sheet 14, dwell. 109, fam. 117, A. C Swinburn household, Roll 1317, page 376B.
  48. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966, accessed 19 Dec 2012.

Edwin N. Swinburne

M, #274, b. 13 September 1813, d. 9 September 1905
E. N. Swinburne

Family

Martha Ann O'Neal b. 15 Dec 1829, d. 18 Dec 1899
Child
Last Edited7 Feb 2022
     
The Problem of Edwin Swinburne's Ancestry

     In the interest of finishing this "site" within a reasonable period of time, I'm not going to exhaustively footnote this section.

     It is my belief that the Swinburnes, a Norman family, came over after the Conquest. They were closely associated with the de Umfraville family. In fact, the Swinburne coat of arms were based on those of the Umfraville family. Robert "with the Beard" Umfraville, Lord of Tour and Vian, came at or shortly after the Conquest with a grant from the Conqueror of the barony of Prudhoe and the valley and forest of Redesdale (properties later associated with the Swinburnes). The Umfravilles were noted for their warlike nature. I suspect, perhaps, the Swinburnes were "poor relations" of the Umfravilles. Nevertheless, they flourished as far as their ability to gain land and serve the king (who, of course, granted them all sorts of favors). The Swinburne men were also tough and martial in that they were charged with guarding the border with Scotland. They were also poets musicians. (Note: despite the many inflated family histories claiming descent from the men at the Battle of Hastings, only fifteen men can be proven to have been there according to contemporaneous sources. Another six are believed to have been there based on reliable documentation. Surely more men fought with William the Conqueror, but we cannot know for certain whom they were.)1,2

     I've spent a considerable amount of time working on the early Swinburne ancestry. What we know is that in 1165 Pagan de Wircestre held a quarter of a knight's fee in the barony of Radulf de Wirecestre. This holding can clearly be identified with the manor of West Swinburne. Pagan was, in all probability, the brother of Radulf. The land continued to be held by this family when in 1297/8, Edward I gave a charter which confirmed their holdings, adding more land. By 1255, the owner of this land was called John de Swyneburne.

     The surname was taken from a small stream in Northumberland recorded as "Swineburn" in the 1236 Book of Fees and derives from the Olde English pre-7th Century "swin", pig, wild board, with "burn", spring, brook, stream; hence "pig stream." The family can easily be traced, although it is impossible to name all of the descendants due to loss of records. And, as one might expect, there are a few bastards (one of them our ancestor) who carried the surname. Only the main names can be followed and there are a few gaps. When the first Baron was created on 26 Sep 1660, the King's heralds only took the lineage back to Thomas Swinburne of Capheaton, Northumberland, who married Margaret Lawson in 1572 because of the issue of bastardy. Thomas' lineage can be traced back to Alexander de Swyneburne who acquired land in June 1302. I should add that I've studied Pipe Rolls, Inquisitions PostMotem (held by the King's heralds at death to ascertain to whom properties will go [the King always hoped to take the land back], and as many original records as possible. I've also consulted documented genealogies (not including Burke's which is notoriously incorrect in many cases).

     The Swinburnes added to their properties relentlessly. But, there was one significant flaw: the men tended to sire little girls. Therefore, over time, much of the family's wealth went with these heiresses to help found other great English families. A prime example being the Percy family (yes, of Hotspur fame).

     If I were to have to define one characteristic of these family, it would be that of Loyalty. This trait was expressed time after time (a Swinburne carried the flag for Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth field in 1485 and was slain along with his king). But, I've also found musicians, clergy, and attendance at early universities among the various descendants.

     Our line is not directly related to the baronial one of which Algernon Charles Swinburne was a member. Naturally, that is the more-documented line (thanks to the King's heralds). Our line, I believe, descends from Thomas Swinburne of Nafferton (1482-1509), known also as Thomas Swinburne of Edlingham. He was the illegitimate son of Sir William Swynburne of Capheaton who was recognized by his father and given land on 26 Jan 1443 (some genealogists believe this John was Williams's illegitimate brother but being his son seems more likely given the generosity of the land provided him).

     The following is a list of our ancestral line up to the point where I cannot bridge the gap:
          Pagan de Wirecestre of West Swinburn
          William, son of Pagan de Wirecestre
          The link to John below is unproven, but believed by most serious antiquarians (as they were called) to be the case
          John de Wirecestre or de Swyneburn, Lord of West Swinburn in 1257 (he may be the same person as John de Wircester, who held the land in 1240 and probably a descent of Pagan de Wircester who held the land in 1168.
          Sir William De Swyneburn, rector of Fordun, died 1289
          Alexander de Swinburne of Capheaton, born 1260, living 26 May 1309
          Sir William de Swinburn II, born 1285 at Capheaton and died 1354
          Sir William Swinburne IV, born c1327 Capheaton and died before 15 May 1363
          Sir William Swinburne V, of Capheaton, born c1353, died 1402
          Sir William Swinburne VI was living in 1443
          Sir William Swinburne VII, Knight, born c1415 at Capheaton, died after 1443 and before 1463
          John Swinburn, illegitimate son of Sir William VII, Knight, inherited land at Nafferton and was living in 1443 and 1451. It was his third son, Gilbert who was stand bearer to King Richard III and killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485.
          Thomas Swinburne, of Nafferton, born c1465, living 1482 and 1509, purchased Edlingham and Heugh
          John Swinburne of Chopwell in county Durham, born c1504 at Edlingham in Northumberland who received lands in a number of areas including Prudhoe.
          Christopher Swinburne
          John Swinburne of Wylam, under 15 in 1545 died bef 31 Aug 1577
          John Swinburne of Wylam who died 1604
          Thomas Swinburne of Butterby, county Durham, born c1597, petitioned for his estates 8 Dec 1645 and died c1666. He was a devout Royalist at the time of the Civil Wars and author of the famous "Swinburne Letters" in defense of Rome. He declined to join the Protestant Party and" turned his sons out of doors because they did soe." He had eight sons. [Remember: I mentioned the extreme loyalty displayed by this family. Whereas many of the great English families were pragmatic enough to have sons who took each side of a controversy so at least part of the family would survive, the Swinburnes appear not to have followed this strategy here.]
          Nicholas Swinburne, according to most printed sources "died young," but, now iis believed to be the ancestor of a large branch of the family in Warwickshire and Worcestershire. Born c1640 in Butterby, Durham, expelled from family when he converted to Protestantism, he moved to Warwickshire where his mother's family had connections. Most genealogies go with the "died young." But, what are we to make of a man named Nicholas Swinburne, born about 1640, who fathered children in Warwickshire where, heretofore, there had been no one by this surname? The current feeling is that the Nicholas Swinburne in Warwickshire is the same man as the Nicholas Swinburne in county Durham.
          John Swinbourne, born c1666, baptized 6 Nov 1666 at St. Peter's, Bickenhill, Warwickshire, buried 1729
          Thomas Swinbourne, baptized 28 Oct 1691 at St. Peter's Bickenhill, possibly died 1772

From here on things become difficult and annoying:
          Henry Swinbourne, baptized 25 Aug 1734 at St. Peter's, Bickenhill married Mary Stanley 6 Sep 1761 at Holy Trinity, Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire. She was born c1741. This is the Stanley connection that seems to prove that Chesterfield Stanley was a cousin to Edwin as mentioned in Edwin's "Journal." Henry is a possible ancestor because I've not found the children of his sons: Jeremiah, born 1772; Robert, born 1774; or, Thomas, born 1788 (oddly enough, I have copious information on his daughters' children).

     I believe Edwin's grandfather to have been:
          James Swinbourne, baptized 13 Dec 1729 at St. Peter's, Bickenhill married Jemima Shipley 24 Jan 1750. She was born c1730. They were the parents of two sons: John, baptized 19 Sep 1754 at St. Peter's; and James, baptized 2 Jun 1762 at St. Giles, Sheldon, Warwickshire and buried 8 Jan 1814 at St. Alphege, Solihull, Warwickshire. Keep in mind that Edwin named two children, his first son, James, and his first daughter, Jemima.

     Despite hours of pouring over parish registers, census, etc. records, in all the areas of Warwickshire and Worcestershire in which the surname is found, I have not found information on these two boys, one of whom is, in all probability, Edwin's father. I have a complete genealogy except for this one critical gap which, so far, I've been utterly unable to fill. I've worked with a woman in England on this family and am indebted for her help with the Swinburnes of Warwickshire and Worcestershire.
     Edwin N. Swinburne was born on 13 September 1813 in Worcestershire, England. He reported his date of birth as September, 1813 in the 1900 census. Edwin reports he was born in 1813 and his death certificate uses the same date.3 In his letter to the editor of the Mexia Evening News in 1899, Edwin mentions his birth date for the first time. He states his place of birth in his journal, but no birth or baptismal record for him has been located in Worcestershire OR Warwickshire at this time.4,5,6

     On Edwin's death certificate, filled out by his son, Sidney, his name is listed as Edmund, and his place of birth is listed as London, England. Sidney filed a delayed death report which may be incorrect because he made other mistakes in family information.7

     So far, I have not found his naturalization papers which might contain birth information. The naturalization and citizenship list for White County, Illinois from 1860-1898 is too late to cover Edwin.

     In 1834, he emigrated to the United States.8 According to his journal, he left England and arrived in New York City in October.9 This would mean he left England in late August or September, given that his journal says it took about 70 days for his ship to travel across the Atlantic. Unfortunately, I cannot find him on any extant passenger list for the period 1832-1835.

     Edwin, 31, married Martha Ann O'Neal, 14, on 12 November 1844 at White County, Illinois. He is listed on the form as Edwin N. Swinburn and she, as Martha Ann ONeil.10,11

     In 1854, he moved to Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas. However, none of his children are shown in the 1854 School Census.8,12 Edwin N. Swinburne was on the School Census in 1857 at Nacogdoches.8

     Edwin began military service on 1 February 1862 by enlisting as a Private in Company A, 17 Reg't Texas Cavalry in Nacogdoches. He was enrolled by T. J. Johnson for a period of one year. He was discharged 23 May 1862 since which time he has substituted for J. A. Fulgham.

     The Company Muster-In Roll states that Edwin N. Swinburn, age 47 years, enlisted as a Private in Capt. Sebron M. Noble's Company, 17 Regiment Texas Cavalry on a Muster Roll dated Camp Likens, March 2, 1862 with the muster-in date listed as March 15, 1862. It shows he joined for duty and enrolled on February 1, 1862 in Nacogdoches for a period of 12 months. The number of miles to the rendezvous point was 70 and the valuation of his horse was $225 and equipments as $25. Both were signed by J. N.(illegible and I'm guessing at an N) Norris.

     On July 27, 1966, someone wrote an order for a photocopy concerning a veteran receipt no. 21814, searcher Bel for Edwin N. Swinburn. The following is a true copy:
               I CERTIFY, That the within named Edwin M. Swinburn a private of Captain S. M. Noble Company of the 17th Regiment of Texas Cavalry, born in Worcestershire England, aged 45 years, 5 feet, 6 inches high, light complexion, blue eyes, light hair and by occupation Brick Mason was enlisted by Capt. Thomas J. Johnson Nacogdoches Texas on the 1st day of February 1862 to serve one year, and is now entitled to discharge by reason of the conscript (guessing) (illegible) he being over 35 years of age
               The said Edwin N. Swinburn was last paid by Capt. J. Fields (to) include the 24th day of May 1862.
               There is due to him forty two Dollars traveling allowance (illegible) Little Rock, the place of discharge, to Nacogdoches Tex the place of enrollment, transportation not being furnished in kind.
               This is due him (line blank)
               He is indebted to the Confederate States (line blank) Dollars on account of (line blank)
               Given in duplicate at Little Rock, this 24th day of May 1862.
                                             S. M. Noble

     For pay from (all of this is crossed out by an X)
     For pay for traveling from Little Rock Ark to Nacogdoches Texas being 350 miles, at ten cents per mile, 40 cts for (illegible) and 20 miles /on horse

          Deduct for clothing overdrawn, (line black)
Balance paid $42.00
               Received of Capt. Julian (illegible) C. S. Army this 10th day of August 1862, Forty Two dollars and (illegible symbol) Cents in full of the above account.
          (Signed Duplicate)                              Edwin N. Swinburn
          Witness                              S. M. Noble, Maj.13 He served after 2 February 1862 in the in Company A, Capt. Arnold's Company, Texas 17th Cavalry, Company A, as an Infantry Rifleman. He's also listed in the 17th Consolidated Texas Dismounted Cavalry.14,15

     On 10 August 1862, Voucher No. 170
          Paid [this date]
          Pvt.
          E. N. Swinburn
          Co. A, 17th Regt. Cav
          Pay mileage $42.00.13

     Dallas News
Athens, Texas, Jan. 16 --
     Your correspondent learned incidentally that Rev. E. W. H. Parker, a Baptist minister now living in Athens, was the color-bearer of a Texas regiment during the Civil War and that he had still in his possession the flag which he then carried. I asked the privilege of seeing and inspecting the flag which was kindly granted, and this blood-stained, battle-marked memento of that great fratricidal strife is now in my possession temporarily. It is tattered and torn, but shows superior handy work and this it was made of the finest material. Thirteen stars are set in two blue bars which cross at right angles on a red or pink square as background at top (part of the page is missing) The rest of the flat is white or cream silk. Its is about seven feet long. It has bullet holes in it and has blood stains on it which were splattered on it when six men were killed near it by an exploding shell.

     Mr. Parker was asked its history, whereupon he handed me the following sketch:
          The 17th Texas Volunteer Cavalry, Confederate Army was organized early in 1862 and ordered to Corinth, Mississippi. In the meantime a Federal army was invading Arkansas from Missouri. Our orders were changed to meet it. We met the advance of said army and turned it back. By the middle of July 1862 our horses were run down and we were dismounted the 16th of July. Our first hard-fought battle was on the 11th day of January 1863, beginning on the 10th. In this battle we were surrendered, nine Texas regiments in all surrendering at the same time. Enough of us escaped after the surrender to make eight companies. In the early part of spring we reorganized with the title of "The 17th Texas Consolidated Regiment," James R. Taylor was made colonel. We lost our flag in the engagement of Jan. 11, 1863 (Arkansas Post) and this flag was made and presented to our regiment by a Miss Watson, two miles west of Shreveport in July 6, 1863. Its first engagement was Vidalia, Louisiana, in February 1865 [I think this is a typo and it should read 1864]. The next at Harrisburg, Louisiana, in the same month. The next Mansfield, Louisiana, April 8, 1864. The next Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, April 9, 1864. Next Marksville, Louisiana, May 16, 1864; next Yellow Bayou, Louisiana, May 18, 1864, which was our last regular engagement. The undersigned received the flag from the hands of Miss Watson and was Regimental Ensign to the close of the war.
                    E. W. H. Parker.16

     At some point after he was enumerated, he moved his family to Mexia in Limestone County.

     On 13 September 1899, in the issue of the Mexia Evening News, E. N. Swinburn writes:
           "This the 13th day of September, I reach my 86th mile stone of human mortal life. My tottering steps plainly tell me that I am reaching the edge of the mystic river - the great divide between mortal and immortal life. How soon the 'boatman pale' may dip his oar in its crystal waters to transfer my enfranchised spirit to the immortal shores of life I cannot tell, but I have an abiding faith in the goodness of one All-Wise Father that I shall in safety reach the evergreen shores of the land of souls; that I shall be welcomed home by my loving children and many dear relatives that have already 'gone before.' One dear little babe whose last smile is photographed on memory's tablets, I shall see again.

           I may truly say I am rising towards the sky; the sunshine is over my head. Heaven lights me with the reflection of its radiant glories. The nearer I approach the end the plainer I hear around me the immortal symphonies of the Heavenly chimes.

           My labor on earth must be nearly done, but only to renew it again in more exalted conditions.
               For ever and ever,
                              E. N. Swinburn.17"

     On 11 October 1899, "E. N. Swinburn returned on the noon train from Dallas, where he has been visiting relatives and attending the fair."18

     After 18 December 1899, E. N. Swinburn wrote to the Editor of the Mexia Evening News:
           "Please allow me through your columns to express my most sincere heart felt thanks to my neighbors and many friends for their many tokens of sympathy and help rendered during my good wife's illness and death. My loss is irreparable. After more than half a century of united life we are riven asunder by the remorseless hand of death. Am I 'smitten of God?' If there is a time to weep, my time is now, and I find solace in tears. I try to cultivate the spirutual (sic), but in the crisis of death the patent powers of nature will dominate our poor humanity. My loss is not all, so far as her influence extended, she was only known for her goodness of heart. The sick and afflicted always received her sympathies and help. She was always ready to offer herself whereever (sic) human suffering needed her.

           Generosity was only bounded by her ability to give and do. While human afflictions are but for a time, the pleasures of eternal life will last forever. Human suffering will cease, clothed in garments of celestial splendor, to live and love forever.19"

     On 13 September 1901, the following letter was published in the Mexia Evening News:
          Yesterday afternoon we received a pleasant visit from Mr. E. N. Swinburn, who left with us the following greeting on the occasion of his 88th birthday:
               "Mr. Editor - This day 88 years ago I was ushered into mortal life. Generations have come and gone since that day, yet I am still on shoals of time, with a modiume (sic) of vitality left that may possibly reach into the future a few 'more rising suns' in the 'world beautiful.' With a demonstrated immortal city before me I remain serene with a confidence that I shall finally reach that better land where I will again be with those that are the occupants of my daily thoughts. With solicitation to you, Mr. Editor, I am your neighbor and friend,
                         E. N. Swinburn"

          This is (sic) old gentleman, is yet hale and hearty in appearance and could easily pass for a man of 60 or 65. He was in the Confederate army nearly, and during the closing days of the struggle had many exciting experiences as a blockade runner on the Mississippi river.
          We enjoyed Mr. Swinburn's visit and hope that he may live to celebrate many more birthday anniversaries."20

     On 30 July 1902, E. N. Swinburne filed a pension application in Dallas County where he had lived for twelve months at 745 South Ervay Street, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas. In his application, he stated that he had never filed for a pension under the Confederate Pension Law. He gave his occupation as Brickmason (sic) and described his physical condition as old and feeble. He stated that he enlisted in Company "A", 17th Texas Calvary and served for about two years [at variance with the above documents]. He stated that he owned 8 acres of land in Limestone County, Texas worth about $10 per acre and owned no personal property, nor had he conveyed or sold any within the prior two years. He stated he had no income, was in indigent circumstances and was unable to labor to earn his support. He furthermore stated that he had never deserted the Confederacy and had been a bona fide resident citizen of Texas continuously since the first day of January, 1880.

     To support his application, there is an affidavit dated February 23, 1903, from his physician, J. T. Wells, M.D., who stated that he had the following disabilities, "Bright's Disease and infirmities incident to old age" which rendered him unable to labor at any work or calling sufficient to earn his support.

     In further support of his application, two additional depositions were included in his request. They were from J. T. Swinburn of Sutton County, dated January 12, 1903, and A. C. Swinburne of Wilbarger County, Texas, dated August 4, 1902. In these depositions, each was asked 6 direct interrogatories which included questions as to their names, ages, present residence, knowledge of applicant and his enlistment in the Confederacy, his company and regiment and his inability to support himself. In addition, there were 4 cross interrogatories requiring answers which were designed to ascertain that the applicant was indeed the person who had served in the Confederate Army or Navy, that the person answering was positively certain that the applicant is the identical person serving as testified, answers not conjecture and, finally, that no desertion had occurred.

     In his deposition, J. T. Swinburn states that E. N. served from 1861 until the end of the war. His handwriting is very difficult to read, but he answers the 6 questions. In A. C. Swinburne's deposition, he states also that E. N served until the end of the war.

     [At no point did anyone indicate that he had served in the navy or with another unit. I had hoped to find confirmation that he had been a blockade runner or had joined another unit.]21,22

     On 19 August 1903, his application for a pension as a Confederate War veteran was approved.22

     On 13 September 1903, a final letter entitled Some Reminiscences was published in the Mexia Evening News:
               "My Good Old Friend, Major N. P. Houx." - I want to say to you that this day ninety years ago I became an inhabitant of mortal life. Through the period of infant life I was tenderly cared for by a loving mother. In time I became a stalwart lad of the street. In early manhood I commenced reading the 'American newspapers' and soon became enthused with a love to see this wonderful country. Before I attained my majority I found myself on the 'bounding billows (?) of the Atlantic ocean, bound for the land of the 'sunset.'

               One incident I will mention: as we were leaving the port two Irish girls and their friends came aboard and there was much weeping at parting. The first thing I knew tears were streaming down my cheeks, so intense was my feeling at the prospect before me that I thought but little of the past. Every Britton loves his country 'whose flag has braved a thousand years the battle and the breeze.'

               I bid adieu to the light little isle, the land of my birth. After seven weeks voyage on the trackless ocean I reached the land of promise. I walked the streets of New York City for three days. On the night of the third day I found what I had been looking for - employment as an ornamental worker in pearl. After remaining there two or three months I committed myself to the bottom (?) of 'Old Ocean.' I reached (?) the only (?) of the South -- New Orleans -- in a thunder storm. There I first saw forked lightning and men dressed in blankets for overcoats. After a stay of several days, I again embarked, this time on a steamboat, to go up the Arkansas River to the head of navigation, which was Fort Gibson, on the Neoaho river, for I wanted to see the 'Red Man' in his 'native wilds.' which I did see them to some extent. I saw one chief whose name was 'Tabba Quoeona (?), perhaps the most noble specimen of physical life I ever saw. His weight must have been nearly three hundred pounds tall and straight as an Indian. To his hair in the back he had attached a buffalo hide, some ten feet long, which was dragging the ground.

               Things soon became monotonous to me and I resolved to soon return again to the States. Two others with myself resolved to go through and strike the Missouri State line. Thus I left the Indian Territory, going through a part of Kansas. I at last came in sight of white people, feeling that I had again reached 'God's Country.' As soon as we found the waters running to the Missouri river we purchased a canoe made out of a walnut tree. This canoe measured twenty-five feet long, ten inches deep and sixteen inches wide. With that frail craft we floated down creeks, pulled over mill dams, and finally reached the turbid waters of the Missouri river, out of which we floated into the 'Great Mississippi River' down to Cairo, thus ending a voyage in that dug-out of about a thousand miles.

               Many months after landing at Cairo I found myself in a valley of the 'Wabash.' There I first saw the lovely maiden - her beauty made me glad. Afterwards she became my bride and the mother of my children. Remaining in that country for several years we finally decided to move to the 'Empire State' of Texas. The civil war (unreadable) I entered the military service of my country and taking my oldest son with me we went through perilous scenes out of number. Escaping the shot and shell of the enemy we finally returned once more to civil life.

               Four years ago the cruelest calamity of my life befell me in the loss of my beloved wife. She with four of her children are in the angel world, and four remain to me in earth life who may reasonably expect many years of mortal life, but as for me

                         A few more setting suns at most,
                              Sing glory, glory, glory,
                         And I shall see my loved and lost
                              In glory, glory, glory.
               Adieu, Mr. Editor, for the present
                              E. N. Swinburne"23.
     [Note: E. P. Houx was also the editor of the Mexia News - a newspaper which often changed its name.]

Edwin N. Swinburne left a will dated in August 1905 at Limestone County, Texas.

The Will of E. N. Swinburn

"State of Texas
Freestone County
     In the name of God Amen. I E. N. Swinburn, a citizen of Limestone county State of Texas temporarily visiting in Freestone county - being of Lawful age and of sound and (unreadable, but perhaps depasing) mind though feeble in body and feeling that my time of life must soon close on earth, Do make and publish this my Last will and Testament.

     First after my death I direct that my body be interred by the graves of my deceased wife and son in the cemetery at Mexia Texas. and while I wish to be buried decently let no ostentacious (sic) ceremonies or display be used.

     Secondly. After my funeral expenses and payment of my board bills if any, I give and bequeath to my beloved Granddaughter Viz. Annie Carey Murray wife of John Murray all my property consisting of my house and lot in the Southern part of Mexia which house and lot was purchased from J. W. F(?)ickers. I thus make Annie my sole Legat(?ubranse). She has had charge of me and cared for me for several years while I on account of my blindness and other infirmities of age being nearly ninety two could not care for myself and I being unable to renumerate (sic) her and her husband for the great sacrifice made by them for my comfort while in my wholly helpless condition. I do give her all that I have of earthly goods and possessions as above mentioned, And ask my several children and grandchildren who may have a legal claim to the said House & Lot waive their right to the same in favor of Annie Carey Murray daughter of my daughter Mary deceased; Those of whom I ask this waiver are Alva C Andrew M. John T. & Sidney J. my sons, and Chas and Lena children of my son E. O. Swinburn deceased and Ernest Pierce my grand-son, This discrimination is not made as a mark of my displeasure or desire on my part to be partial but to do justice. I earnestly desire that settlement of my affair be made without the aid of the court.

     I hereby appoint John F. Murray my executor to act without giving bond in the execution of this my Last will & testament.
                     E. N. Swinburne
     Witness
     M. H. Harris
     G. B. Everett
     H. M. Myers."24,25,26

     Edwin N. Swinburne died on 9 September 1905 at age 91 in Bonner, Freestone County, Texas,27,28 and was buried in Mexia City Cemetery, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas.
     "Last Saturday afternoon Grandpa E. N. Swinburn breathed his last at the home of Mr. Murray in Woodland, where he had been sick for several weeks. He was buried at the Mexia cemetery Saturday afternoon, the funeral occurring from the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ed Swinburn. Rev. Harrison of Wortham officiated at the grave and made an appropriate talk in which he told of the recent conversion of deceased and his joining the church during a revival at Woodland.

     Mr. Swinburn was a man well-preserved for his age and until recently was able to get about fairly well.

     Had he lived until the 13th of this month he would have been 93 years old. He was born in England but came to this country when quite a young man and has lived in this section for many years and raised a family of children who all married and raised families.
The writer knew Mr. Swinburn to be a good conscientious-man (sic), honest and sincere in his convictions, and one whom to know was to love and respect.

     He was a good upright citizen and there are many who will mourn his demise. His life was full of years of usefulness and may his soul rest in peace in that land where trouble and sorrow cannot enter. Peace to his ashes."
     Although the obituary was unsigned, I believe it was written by the editor of the newspaper, Major E. P. Houx.6

     A briefer obituary, with a picture, ran in the Dallas Morning News on 22 Sep 1905:
          "E. N. Swinburn died at Woodland, near this city (Mexia), Saturday, Sept. 9 and was buried here this afternoon. Deceased was 93 years old and came to this county from England when a young man. He had lived in this section for many years and leaves a large number of descendants. His wife preceded him to the other world several years ago, since which time he has been living with relatives. He was a well preserved man and up to a few months ago was active as most men of 60."

     Google Maps does not show Bonner as existing, but it is just outside Fairfield.

     To find E.N.'s, Martha Ann's, Mary E. and Tom Carey's, Edwin O.'s and Ruby Carey Swinburn's burial sites at the Mexia Cemetery: as you enter the town on Highway 84 heading south, turn west on North Kaufman Street which runs directly into the cemetery, take the entrance road until you reach the second road to the left (south) for about 220 feet, the graves are located about 60 feet west (almost in the center) behind a large oak tree.29,4,30

(To read his shorter obituary which ran in the Dallas Morning News, click Edwin N. Swinburn Obituary)

     His estate was probated on 27 November 1905 in Limestone County, Texas. Application was duly made to the Hon. James Kimbill, Judge, in Application No. 1214 in which the probable value of the estate was estimated to be $1,000 (worth $25,161.54 in 2012 dollars).

The State of Texas            Estate of E. N. Swinburn deceased
County of Limestone            Proof of Last Will and Testament of
E. N. Swinburn Deceased
          This day personally appeared in open court G. B. Everett who, being duly sworn as a witness in the above untitled matter, and examined on behalf of the applicant to prove said Will, says: I was well acquainted with E. N. Swinburn deceased, during his Life Time; I knew the above decedent for about 25 or 30 years before his death; the signature of The said deceased to the instrument (unreadable) shown to me and offered for probate as his Last Will and Testament, filed in this court on the 21 day of October A. D. 1895 (sic) and bearing date on the (blank) day of (blank) A. D. 1905 was made by the deceased on said Last named date at Bonner, Texas, in presence of my self, G. B. Everett, M. H. Harris and H. M. Harris, the other subscribing witness; all of said witnesses being over the age of fourteen years. At the time of making of said Will the testator was of sound and disposing mind and memory, and he declared the said Will so made by him to be his Last Will and Testament, and I thereupon signed my name as a witness to-gether with M. H. Harris and H. M. Harris at the request of the said testator in his presence and in the presence of each other. The said deceased at the time of the execution of said instrument was ninety two years of age; the said E. N. Swinburn departed this Life on the 9 day of Sept A. D. 19-5 about one month after making said Will in the county of Freestone in the State of Texas. Their residence and principal estate was situated in Limestone Co Tex
                                                   G. B. Everett
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th day of Nov. A. D. 1905 in open court.
                                             Alf Mills Clerk to
                                             County Court Limestone (unreadable)
By S. H. Wright Deputy.31

(The early 19th century Journal of Edwin N. Swinburn is a fascinating document. To read a copy of the typescript of his journal, click The Journal of Edwin Swinburn)

     The narrative ends abruptly. One can only wonder why he never even finished his last sentence because he lived till 1905, some 40 years after the Civil War ended. It would've been helpful to know exactly in which unit he served during the last years of the war. In several places the journal didn't make sense due, I suspect, to difficulty in reading the handwritten original by the typist who transcribed it. The copy sent me was too dim from which to make photo copies.32

     The Research Center also has copies of both E.N.'s and Alva C.'s enlistment and muster out documents from the Civil War, as well as copies of several letters to the editor of the Mexia Evening News. The journal transcription is dated February 21, 1967 with the name John Swinburne on the top, probably for whom it was made. The copy was presented to the East Texas Research Center by Martha T. Webb of Teague, then a student at Stephen F. Austin.

Tax Rolls

DatePropertyLocation
1857Nacogdoches County, Texas8
1861Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas33
1862Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas8
1890although he was living in Mexia by then. He must have retained some property in Nacogdoches CountyNacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas8

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1840unable to find him on either FamilySearch or Ancestry.com as of 23 Sep 2019
185034 years old and born in England with a household consisting of his wife and two childrenLynn Township, Posey County, Indiana34
Brickmaker34
186044 years old with a household consisting of his wife and four childrenNacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas35
Brick Mason, with real estate valued at $800 (worth $20,147.95 in 2012 dollars) and personal property valued at $700 (worth $17,629.46 in 2012 dollars).36,37
187053 and living with his wife and seven of their children: John T., James, Andrew, Josephine, Mary, Sidney, and Edward (sic). The form shows that he cannot read and read which we know to be untrue. I believe the enumerator mistakenly filled out the entire sheet which shows nearly everybody, with the exception of small children, unable to read and writeNacogdoches PO, Nacogdoches County, Texas38
Brickmason38
188067 years of age. His daughter, Mary E., and her baby are living with him, as are five boardersMexia, Limestone County, Texas39
Brick Mason39
1890as reconstructed from the 1890 Tax ListLimestone County, Texas40
190086 years of age. He is living with his grandson Earnest (age 16), granddaughter Anna M. Carey (age 20) and granddaughter Josephine (age 16)Mexia, Limestone County, Texas41

Citations

  1. [S3719] "Companions of William the Conqueror", contributed by Wikipedia, online at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Companions_of_William_the_Conqueror , accessed 15 Feb 2014, website address verified 13 Jul 2019. This article is well-documented.
  2. [S1242] Camp, Anthony J.. My Ancestors Came With The Conqueror: Those Who Did, and Some of Those Who Probably Did not (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1990).
  3. [S213] E. N. Swinburn entry, Death Certificate of E. N. Swinburne, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas.
  4. [S878] E. N. Swinburne tombstone. Toby Turner, photographer, 3 Jul 1999, Mexia Cemetery, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas.
  5. [S1802] Letters to Editor, Mexia Evening News, Mexia, Texas, letter dated 13 Sep 1899; a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University., Microfilm borrowed from newspaper and viewed in Mexia Library 19 Oct 2000.
  6. [S795] Obituary of E. N. Swinburne, The State Herald, 14 Sep 1905, Microfilm Volume 6 - January 1904 - December 1905.
  7. [S213] Death Cert., E. N. Swinburn, 19 Dec 2012 still unavailable on FamilySearch or Footnote.
  8. [S280] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves. Nacogdoches--Gateway to Texas : a biographical directory, II (Fort Worth: Arrow/Curtis Print. Co., 1974), page 391.
  9. [S1804] Journal of E. N. Swinburne, hand-written original, n.d., Edwin Swinburn Collection, 1862-1908, A-176, East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas.
  10. [S410] Vaught, Harriet B.. Marriages from White County, Illinois (Carmi, Illinois: H. B. Vaught, 1950), page 40.
  11. [S1023] "Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900", contributed by Office of the Secretary of State of Illinois, online at https://www.ilsos.gov/isavital/marriagesrch.jsp , website address verified 2 Jul 2019, Volume 002.
  12. [S1390] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, compiler. 1854 school census of Nacogdoches County (s.l.: s.n., bet 1980-1996).
  13. [S1428] E. N. Swinburn, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from Texas, 17th (Consolidatetd) Dismounted Cavalry - E. N. Swinburn (n.p.: n.pub.), Record Group unknown record group, Roll Microcropy - 323, Roll #96; digitized and made available by unknown agency, unknown url.
  14. [S578] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, The People of Nacogdoches County in the Civil War, 1980), page 260.
  15. [S322] Freestone County Historical Commission. History of Freestone County, Texas (n.a.: Freestone County Historical Commission, 1978), page 599.
  16. [S1806] "17th Texas Cavalry Flag," Athens Weekly, transcribed by Freeman, Bunny Shumate on 8 Feb 2002, www.rootsweb.com/~txhender/Military/CivilWar/colorbearer.htm, 3 Feb 1903 the original site is no longer accessible as of 1 Feb 2014, but can now be found at https://www.tsl.texas.gov/treasures/flagsandmaps/flags/historic-flags.html and https://www.tsl.texas.gov/exhibits/flags/4038Granbury.htm
  17. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, letter dated 13 Sep 1899; a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University.
  18. [S6039] "Newspapers.com," index and images, (Ancestry.com: (Provo, Utah), accessed 22 Mar 2020, entry for E. N. Swinburn, 1899, Mexia Evening Ledger (Mexia, Texas), issue of 11 Oct 1899.
  19. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University.
  20. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, letter dated 13 Sep 1901; a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University.
  21. [S796] E. N. Swinburne file; Controller's File No 09823 (Austin, Texas: Texas State Archives).
  22. [S5897] "Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958," index and images, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc.: (Provo, Utah), accessed 5 Jul 2019, entry for E. N. Swinburne, Dallas County, #9823, images 389-404 of 479.
  23. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, letter dated 13 Sep 1903, a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, as well as the original, as seen in the microfilmed copy, is very poor and could not be copied so I transcribed it by hand.
  24. [S657] Swinburn, E. N., Will of E. N. Swinburn, Book L, Case No. 1214, pages 431-434 N75, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas, although this will is apparently undated, it appears to have been made about one month before his death. A copy of the will, postings, and proof are in the possession of Toby Turner.
  25. [S794] E. N. Swinburne will (undated), Limestone County Will Book L L, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas.
  26. [S5714] "Texas, Wills and Probate Records, 1833-1974," index and images, (Ancestry.com: (www.ancestry.com), accessed 5 Jul 2019, entry for E N Swinburn, Limestone, Probate Minutes, Vol K-L, 1901-1906, image 576-577 of 689.
  27. [S1948] "E.N.SWINBURN," Dallas Morning News, Texas, 22 Sep 1905, page 6, E.N. Swinburn.
  28. [S213] Death Cert., E. N. Swinburn, 19 Dec 2012; still unavailable on FamilySearch as of 20 Jun 2017. Only one death certificate can be found by browsing (Pauline Estill Block) for the period of 1903-1909 for Limestone County.
  29. [S367] Virginia J. Bounds and Imogene C. Barham. Limestone County, Texas Cemetery Surveys, I, Part 2 (Groesbeck, Texas: Limestone County History Museum, 1988).
  30. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 22 Aug 2011, memorial page for Edwin N. Swinburne (1813-1905) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Toby, maintained by Toby; citing Mexia City Cemetery, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas.
  31. [S657] Will of E.N. Swinburn, Book L, Case No. 1214, pages 431-434 N75.
  32. [S1804] Journal of E. N. Swinburne, hand-written original, n.d. East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, copy of the original is in the possession of Toby Turner.
  33. [S280] Ericson, Nacogdoches - Gateway to TX, page 341.
  34. [S961] "1850 United States Federal Census," Posey County, Indiana, population schedule, Lynn Township, dwelling 790, family 790, Edwin Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm M432, Roll 166, page 221B, Image 20. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  35. [S68] "1860 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, Nacogdoches, Beat No. 1 A Township, dwelling 60, family 60, E N Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm M653, Roll 1301, page 120B. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  36. [S576] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, editor, The People of Nacogdoches County in 1860 - An Edited Census, 1978), page 7.
  37. [S68] "1860 U. S. Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, pop. sch., Beat No. 1 A Township, dwell. 60, fam. 60, E N Swinburn household, Roll 1301, page 120B.
  38. [S672] "1870 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, 1st District Township, dwelling 115, family 115, Edward N Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm M593, Roll 1599, page 429A. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online,. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  39. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Mexia Township, Enumeration District (ED) 917, Sheet 11, dwelling 122, family 124, Edwin N Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T9, Roll 1317, page 442A. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  40. [S69] Moody, Mary C., compiler. 1890 Limestone County, Texas Census (Arlington: Blackstone Publishing Company, 1988).
  41. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Precinct No 4, Mexia Town Township, Enumeration District (ED) 59, Sheet 14, dwelling 267, family 269, Edwin N Swinburne household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T623, Roll 1655, page 206B or 206C( if using a roll and page number search). ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Eula Leta Swinburne

F, #257, b. 25 March 1875, d. 6 September 1948
FatherAlvin Curtis Swinburn1,2 b. 15 Nov 1845, d. 11 May 1920
MotherNancy Elizabeth Gilbert2 b. 15 Oct 1848, d. 5 Dec 1927

Family

William Franklin Turner b. 7 Jan 1875, d. 12 Mar 1920
Child
Last Edited29 Apr 2022
     Eula Leta Swinburne was born on 25 March 1875, daughter of Alvin Curtis Swinburn and Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert, in Mexia, Limestone County, Texas.
     She also is reported to have been born on 25 March 1878 in Texas.3

     Eula and William Franklin Turner obtained a marriage license on 10 April 1897 in Smith County, Texas.4,5

     Eula Leta Swinburne, 22 years, 2 months and 2 days, married William Franklin Turner, 22 years, 4 months and 20 days, son of Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner and Dora Anna Shuford, on 27 May 1897 at Smith County, Texas, with C. R. Wright, Methodist Minister, officiating.6,7,5

     Elisabeth remembers that her mother was unprepared to handle business matters at the time of her husband's death. J. S. Bridwell, a prominent Wichita Falls businessman, was helpful to her. She was smart and caught on quickly, however she had a hard time during the Depression when loans her husband had made were not repaid. She took in boarders during this time.

     Elisabeth says her mother was inclined to be artistic. She particularly liked to make doll clothes. Unfortunately, Elisabeth was not particularly interested in dolls.8

     She'd lived at 1610 12th Street in Wichita Falls for 39 years.2

     Eula Leta Turner died of cerebral hemorrahge which had occurred 6 years previously on 6 September 1948 at age 73 in Bethania Hospital, Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas,9 and was buried on 9 September 1948 in Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas.
     I photographed this tombstone during a visit to the family plot. I verified the date of death of 6 Sep 1948 on her tombstone on July 6, 2004 which MUST be in error as she was buried, according to her death certificate, on 9 Dec. I was surprised to find that no obituary had been sent to the newspapers. I carefully read all the microfilm for the dates immediately after death.2,10

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1880as [?]ula and 3 years of ageSpringfield & Tehuacana Precincts, Limestone County, Texas11
190022 years of age and reports having borne two children, both of whom are livingCisco, Eastland County, Texas6
191032 years of age, married for thirteen years and having borne three children of whom two are livingWichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas12
192041 years of ageWichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas13
193052 years of age, widowed, owns her home valued at $7,000 and owns a radio set. No occupation is listed. Also living in her household was a Boarder, Pearl Crenshaw, age 37, who was a Public School TeacherWichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas14

Citations

  1. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, Enumeration District (ED) 95, Sheet 14, dwelling 109, family 117, A. C Swinburn household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T9, Roll 1317, page 376B. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JD2J-6YJ : accessed 19 Dec 2012), Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966.
  3. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966, accessed 19 Dec 2012. This is also the date shown on her tombstone.
  4. [S6211] "Texas, Select County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," index, (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.: (Provo, Utah), accessed 18 Jul 2021, entry for Willie Turner and Eula Swinburn, 27 May 1897, Smith County 1879-1965, page 264, wrong image 22068 of 51813. I scanned back and forth and could never find the image of this marriage document because the page was truncated just above their record.
  5. [S5502] "Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-994K-CL2Y?i=31&cc=1803985&cat=1136707, entry for Willie F. Turner and Eula Swinburn, Smith County, page 264, accessed 18 Jul 2021). This image is not truncated and, although faint, can be read.
  6. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 61, Sheet 11, dwelling 212, family 213, Willie F Turner household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T623, Roll 1629, page 243A. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  7. [S6211] "TX Select County Marr. Recds., 1837-1965," index, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., entry for Willie Turner and Eula Swinburn, 27 May 1897, Smith County 1879-1965, page 264, wrong image 22068 of 51813. I scanned back and forth and could never find the image of this marriage document because the image is truncated, cutting off their record.
  8. [S875] Interview with Elisabeth Turner Alford (Wichita Falls, Texas), by Toby Turner, October 13-14, 1999. Library of Toby Turner (Houston, Harris County, Texas).
  9. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966, accessed 19 Dec 2012. Replacement of previous source, but no actual death certificate is available online for verification of cause of death.
  10. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 7 Dec 2018, memorial page for Eula Leeta Swinburn Turner (1878-1948) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Toby, maintained by ProgBase; citing Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas.
  11. [S677] "1880 U. S. Census," Limestone County, Texas, pop. sch., Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, ED 95, Sheet 14, dwell. 109, fam. 117, A. C Swinburn household, Roll 1317, page 376B.
  12. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Wichita Falls Township, Enumeration District (ED) 225, Sheet 2B, dwelling 35, family 39, William F. Turner household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T624, Roll 1597, page 253. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  13. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 120, Sheet 4A, dwelling 78, family 84, William F Turner household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T625, Roll 1858, page 63A or 63B if using roll and page number search. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  14. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Wichita Falls Township, Enumeration District (ED) 243-16, Sheet 1A, dwelling 6, family 7, Eula Turner household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T626, Roll 2409, page 40. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Hazel Milton Swindler1

F, #26759, b. 5 August 1914, d. 22 February 2009

Family

Robert Leigh Turner b. 23 Mar 1912, d. 18 Oct 2002
Last Edited11 Jul 2021
     Hazel Milton Swindler was born on 5 August 1914 in Ozark, Franklin County, Arkansas.1,2

     Hazel, 32, married Robert Leigh Turner, 35, son of Robert Wyley Turner and Mary Anna Leigh, on 20 July 1947 in Mountain Home, Baxter County, Arkansas.1

     Hazel Milton Turner died on 22 February 2009 at age 94 in Little Rock, Pulaski County, Arkansas,2 and was buried in Mirchell Cemetery, Greenway, Clay County, Arkansas.2

Citations

  1. [S6584] "Arkansas, Marriage Certificates, 1917-1969," index and images, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc.: (Provo, Utah), accessed 10 Jul 2021, entry for Robert Leigh Turner and Hazel Milton Swindler, 20 Jul 1947, Mountain Home, Baxter County, Stamped 57 001109, image 1113 of 3553.
  2. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 10 Jul 2021, memorial page for Hazel Swindler Turner (1914-2009) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Ronald Steward, maintained by Rosa Cline; citing Mitchell Cemetery, Greenway, Clay County, Arkansas.

Benjamin Talley1

M, #24391, b. circa 1878
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherWilliam R. Talley1 b. 3 Dec 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
MotherMary R. Moss1 b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Last Edited17 Dec 2016
     Benjamin Talley was born circa 1878, son of William R. Talley and Mary R. Moss, in North Carolina.1

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18802 years of ageHawtree Township, Warren County, North Carolina1

Citations

  1. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCXB-B2C ), entry for William B Talley, 1880, Hawtree, Warren, North Carolina, United States; citing enumeration district ED 282, sheet 50B, family 242, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0985; FHL microfilm 1,254,985, accessed 17 Dec 2016.

Clifton W. Talley1

M, #5589, b. May 1880
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherWilliam R. Talley1 b. 3 Dec 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
MotherMary R. Moss1 b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Last Edited16 Jan 2021
     Clifton W. Talley was born in May 1880, son of William R. Talley and Mary R. Moss, in North Carolina.1

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190020 years of ageRoanoke, (Independent City), Virginia1
Laborer, Machine Shop1

Citations

  1. [S5786] "1900 United States Federal Census," index and images, Ancestry.com ( Provo, Utah): accessed 16 Jan 2021), William R Talley, 1900, Roanoke, Roanoke City, Virginia; citing page 11, family 187, FHL microfilm 1,241,739.

Edward Talley1

M, #24390, b. circa 1876
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherWilliam R. Talley1 b. 3 Dec 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
MotherMary R. Moss1 b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Last Edited17 Dec 2016
     Edward Talley was born circa 1876, son of William R. Talley and Mary R. Moss, in North Carolina.1

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18804 years of ageHawtree Township, Warren County, North Carolina1

Citations

  1. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCXB-B2C ), entry for William B Talley, 1880, Hawtree, Warren, North Carolina, United States; citing enumeration district ED 282, sheet 50B, family 242, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0985; FHL microfilm 1,254,985, accessed 17 Dec 2016.

Eva E. Talley1

F, #25991, b. June 1884
Relationship3rd great-granddaughter of Terisha Turner
FatherWilliam R. Talley1 b. 3 Dec 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
MotherMary R. Moss1 b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Last Edited16 Jan 2021
     Eva E. Talley was born in June 1884, daughter of William R. Talley and Mary R. Moss, in North Carolina.1

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190015 years of ageRoanoke, (Independent City), Virginia

Citations

  1. [S5786] "1900 United States Federal Census," index and images, Ancestry.com ( Provo, Utah): accessed 16 Jan 2021), William R Talley, 1900, Roanoke, Roanoke City, Virginia; citing page 11, family 187, FHL microfilm 1,241,739.

Jacob E. Talley1

M, #25992, b. June 1889
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherWilliam R. Talley1 b. 3 Dec 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
MotherMary R. Moss1 b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Last Edited16 Jan 2021
     Jacob E. Talley was born in June 1889, son of William R. Talley and Mary R. Moss, in Virginia.1

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190010 years of ageRoanoke, (Independent City), Virginia1

Citations

  1. [S5786] "1900 United States Federal Census," index and images, Ancestry.com ( Provo, Utah): accessed 16 Jan 2021), William R Talley, 1900, Roanoke, Roanoke City, Virginia; citing page 11, family 187, FHL microfilm 1,241,739.

John Talley1

M, #24392, b. May 1880
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherWilliam R. Talley1 b. 3 Dec 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
MotherMary R. Moss1 b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Last Edited17 Dec 2016
     John Talley was born in May 1880, son of William R. Talley and Mary R. Moss, in North Carolina.1

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18801/12 year of ageHawtree Township, Warren County, North Carolina1

Citations

  1. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCXB-B2C ), entry for William B Talley, 1880, Hawtree, Warren, North Carolina, United States; citing enumeration district ED 282, sheet 50B, family 242, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0985; FHL microfilm 1,254,985, accessed 17 Dec 2016.

Martha Talley1

F, #24093, b. 18 March 1839, d. 29 June 1901
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)

Family

James Rives Watkins b. 28 Feb 1829, d. 12 Oct 1907
Children
Last Edited17 Oct 2019
     Martha Talley was born on 18 March 1839 in North Carolina.2,3

     Martha Talley, 14, married James Rives Watkins, 24, son of John Watkins and Mary Rives, on 22 June 1853 in Warren County, North Carolina.4

     Martha Watkins died on 29 June 1901 at age 622 and was buried in Warren Plains United Methodist Church Cemetery, Warrenton, Warren County, North Carolina.2

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1860unable to find her
187032 years of ageNutbush Township, Warren County, North Carolina5
188041 years of ageHawtree Township, Warren County, North Carolina6
190061 years of age, married forty-seven years, and having borne nine children all of whom are livingWarrenton, Warren County, North Carolina3

Citations

  1. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 1 Dec 2016, memorial page for Lois Williams at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Descendant, maintained by 62985363.
  2. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for Martha T. Watkins (1839-1901) at memorial page....
  3. [S5503] "United States Census, 1900," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MS1M-6BX ): accessed 3 Dec 2016), James R Watkins, 1900, Township Warrington town, Warren, North Carolina, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 102, sheet 11B, family 209, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,241,222.
  4. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for James R. Watkins (1829-1907) at memorial page....
  5. [S5500] "United States Census, 1870," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MWDW-3S4 ), entry for James Watkins, 1870, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 35, family 282, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 552,663, accessed 3 Dec 2016.
  6. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCXB-1Y2 ), entry for James R Watkins, 1880, Hawtree, Warren, North Carolina, United States; citing enumeration district ED 282, sheet 45D, household 148, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0985; FHL microfilm 1,254,985, accessed 3 Dec 2016.
  7. [S3458] "Tennessee Deaths, 1914-1966," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NSQV-5X8, entry for Mary Agnes Watkins Walker, 05 Oct 1942; citing Oakwood Cemetery, Haywood, Tennessee, cn 20843, State Library and Archives, Nashville; FHL microfilm 1,876,915, accessed 22 Dec 2016).
  8. [S2989] "North Carolina, County Marriages, 1762-1979," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:F8QV-C6R, entry for Benjamin S. Walker and Mary A. Watkins, 19 Apr 1871; citing , Warren, North Carolina, United States, p. 1871, Office of Archives and History, Division of Archives and Records. State Archive of North Carolina and various county Register of Deeds; FHL microfilm 453,656, accessed 22 Dec 2016). No image available as of 17 Jul 2017.

Richard Talley1

M, #24389, b. circa 1875
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherWilliam R. Talley1 b. 3 Dec 1850, d. 10 Dec 1928
MotherMary R. Moss1 b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Last Edited17 Dec 2016
     Richard Talley was born circa 1875, son of William R. Talley and Mary R. Moss, in North Carolina.1

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18805 years of ageHawtree Township, Warren County, North Carolina1

Citations

  1. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCXB-B2C ), entry for William B Talley, 1880, Hawtree, Warren, North Carolina, United States; citing enumeration district ED 282, sheet 50B, family 242, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0985; FHL microfilm 1,254,985, accessed 17 Dec 2016.

Travis Talley1

M, #3753, b. circa 1807

Family

Sarah Wright b. c 1811
Child
Last Edited17 Jan 2021
     Travis Talley was born circa 1807 in North Carolina.2

     Travis Talley married Sarah Wright on 15 February 1830 in Warren County, North Carolina.3

     On 29 May 1838, he is named in his brother, Ransom Talley's, will of this date.4

     Travis Talley left a will dated on 16 September 1847 in Warren County, North Carolina. In Travis Talley's will of this date, he names his beloved wife Sarah who is named executor. Although he mentions children, he does not name them.5

     His estate was probated in November 1855 in Warren County, North Carolina.5

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
185043 years of age. Possible children: Levi, age 19, Carpenter; Cintha, age 15; Lucy A, age 14; Martha, age 11; Sarah, age ?; Benjamin T., age 7; Harriette, age 4; and John, age 2Warren District, Warren County, North Carolina2
Farmer with real estate valued at $1,4702

Citations

  1. [S279] Gammon, David, e-mail message from <e-mail address> to Toby Turner, entitled "Jacob Davis Family", dated 29 Feb 2000, with genealogy report attached entitled "a. Jacob Davis (son of Peter Davis & Hannah Turner)". Mr. Gammon is descended from Rhoda Turner and is the author of numerous abstracts of North Carolina public records and reporting on his own line.
  2. [S5959] "1850 United States Federal Census," index and images, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc: (www.ancestry.com), accessed 16 Jan 20212, entry for Travis Talley, 1850, Warren, Warren, North Carolina; citing roll 648, page 34b, family 437, image 4 of 65; citing original data from the National Archives MIcrofilm Publication M432.
  3. [S2866] "North Carolina Marriages, 1762-1979," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QKJ7-S2JJ ), entry for Travis Talley and Sally Wright, 15 Feb 1830; citing Warren, North Carolina, United States, p. , North Carolina State Archives Division of Archives and History; FHL microfilm 432,254, accessed 25 Nov 2020.
  4. [S88] Gammon, David B., abstractor. Abstracts of Wills, Warren County, North Carolina 1779-1844, I (Raleigh: D.B. G., 1995), page 109, citing page 477.
  5. [S5764] "North Carollina Wills and Probate Records, 1665-1998," index and images, Ancestry.com (Provo, Utah: accessed 16 Jan 2021, entry for Travis Talley, 1855, Warren County, Original Wills, Riggan, Christopher H to Yeargain, Samuel, images 618-620 of 1435; citing original data from the North Carolina Secretary of State, .

William R. Talley1

M, #3752, b. 3 December 1850, d. 10 December 1928
FatherTravis Talley b. c 1807
MotherSarah Wright b. c 1811
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)

Family

Mary R. Moss b. Sep 1852, d. 19 Feb 1929
Children
Last Edited8 Mar 2022
     
Questions About His Parentage

     My question with respect to his parentage is that he was not enumerated with his mother in 1860. Perhaps there were financial reasons why he was living with another family in 1860. However, he was enumerated with her in 1870 so perhaps he was indeed Travis' son.2
     William R. Talley was born on 3 December 1850, son of Travis Talley and Sarah Wright, in Warren County, North Carolina.3,4

     William R. Talley, 20, married Mary R. Moss, daughter of Howell Richard Moss and Dionitia Tempe Davis, on 20 September 1871.1

     William R. Talley died of Chronic Myocarditis and Intestinal Indigestion with a contributory factor of Cerebral Hemorrhage on 10 December 1928 at age 78 in Roanoke, (Independent City), Virginia,4 and was buried on 12 December 1928 in Fair View Cemetery, Roanoke, (Independent City), Virginia.
     Find a Grave does not have a memorial page for him as of 16 Jan 2021.4

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18609 years of age but living within the household of D Minatree, age 83, and M Ministree, age 65Warren County, North Carolina5
187020 years of ageHawtree Township, Warren County, North Carolina2
Farm Laborer2
1880as William B., 30 years of age, with liver disease, and living immediately adjacent to his mother, Sally Talley. Also living within his household were Andrew Epps, Black, 16, Servant; and Nannie Epps, Black, 12, ServantHawtree Township, Warren County, North Carolina6
Farmer6
190049 years of age and married twenty-eight years. Also living in his household were R. Walter Johnson, boarder; and Stella Talley, grandaughter, born Feb 1896, and 4 years of ageRoanoke, (Independent City), Virginia3
Policeman3

Citations

  1. [S279] Gammon, David, e-mail message from <e-mail address> to Toby Turner, entitled "Jacob Davis Family", dated 29 Feb 2000, with genealogy report attached entitled "a. Jacob Davis (son of Peter Davis & Hannah Turner)". Mr. Gammon is descended from Rhoda Turner and is the author of numerous abstracts of North Carolina public records and reporting on his own line.
  2. [S5981] "1870 United States Federal Census," index and images, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc: (Provo, Utah), accessed 16 Jan 2021, entry for William R. Tally in the household of Sarah Tally, 1870, Hawtree, Warren, North Carolina; citing roll M593_1164, page 485B, family 68, FHL microfilm 552,663, image 10 of 39; citing original data from the National Archives and Records Administration.
  3. [S5786] "1900 United States Federal Census," index and images, Ancestry.com ( Provo, Utah): accessed 16 Jan 2021), William R Talley, 1900, Roanoke, Roanoke City, Virginia; citing page 11, family 187, FHL microfilm 1,241,739.
  4. [S6048] "Virginia, Death Records, 1912-2014," index and images, (Ancestry.com: (Provo, Utah), accessed 16 Jan 2021, entry for William R Talley, 1928, Roanoke, Roanoke, Virginia, Cert. No. 1928029241, image 469 of 570.
  5. [S5784] "1860 United States Federal Census," index and images, Ancestry.com Operations, Inc. (ancestry.com): accessed 16 Jan 2021), W R Tally in the household of D Minatree, 1860, Warren, North Carolina; citing page 559, family 796, FHL microfilm 803,916.
  6. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCXB-B2C ), entry for William B Talley, 1880, Hawtree, Warren, North Carolina, United States; citing enumeration district ED 282, sheet 50B, family 242, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 0985; FHL microfilm 1,254,985, accessed 17 Dec 2016.

Lomie A. Talton1,2

F, #20627, b. 19 April 1886, d. 30 August 1958

Family

Thomas Sumpter Turner b. 23 Jan 1873, d. 1 Dec 1919
Last Edited6 Jul 2021
     Lomie A. Talton was born on 19 April 1886 in Selma, Johnston County, North Carolina. She was the daughter of Ransome Talton and Evelyn Deans.3,1
     She was also known as Louisa.4

     Lomie, 17, married Thomas Sumpter Turner, 31, son of Thomas Sumpter Turner and Laura Virginia Whitehead, on 16 March 1904 in Selma, Johnston County, North Carolina, with Rosa L. Roberts, W. L. Talton and E. D. Sanders as witnesses.4,3,2

     Lomie A. Turner died Coronary Occlusion on 30 August 1958 at age 72 in Portsmouth, (Independent City), Virginia,5 and was buried on 1 September 1958 in Olive Branch Cemetery, Portsmouth, (Independent City), Virginia.1,6

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1910as Lomie A, 22 years of age, married for six years and having borne three children all of whom are livingWestern Branch District, Norfolk County, Virginia3
194057 years of age, widowed and living in the household of her son Collins H. Turner and his brother, Charles E. TurnerPortsmouth, (Independent City), Virginia7

Citations

  1. [S6048] "Virginia, Death Records, 1912-2014," index and images, (Ancestry.com: (Provo, Utah), accessed 22 Nov 2020, entry for Lomie A Turner, 1958, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Cert. No. 1958020013, image 276 of 448.
  2. [S5766] "North Carolina, Marriage Records, 1741-2011," index and images, (Ancestry.com: (Provo, Utah), accessed 22 Nov 2020, entry for T S Turner and Lomia A Talton, 1904, Johnston County, image 1538 of 2387; citing original data from the North Carolina County Registers of Deeds.
  3. [S5973] "1910 United States Federal Census," index and images, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc: (Provo, Utah), accessed 22 Nov 2020, entry for Thomas S Turner, 1910, Western Branch, Norfolk Virginia; citing page 41B, family 831, FHL Microfilm 1,375,651, image 79 of 86; citing original data from the National Archives & Records Administration.
  4. [S6048] "VA Death Recds., 1912-2014," index and images, Ancestry.com, entry for Thomas S Turner, 1919, Portsmouth, Virginia, Stamped No. 30210, image 149 of 586.
  5. [S6048] "VA Death Recds., 1912-2014," index and images, Ancestry.com, entry for Lomie A Turner, 1958, Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Cert. No. 1958020013, image 276 of 448. Her son, Collins H. Turner was the informant.
  6. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 22 Nov 2020, memorial page for Lomie A. Turner (1881-1958) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Steve Poole, maintained by Steve Poole; citing Olive Branch Cemetery, Portsmouth, Portsmouth City, Virginia.
  7. [S3341] "1940 United States Federal Census," digital images, (Ancestry.com: (n.p.), accessed 22 Nov 2020, entry for Lomie A Turner in the household of Collins H. Turner, 1940, Portsmouth City, Portsmouth City, Virginia; citing page 7B, family 153, image 14 of 31; citing original data from the National Archives and Records Administration.

Norma Joanne Tansley1

F, #24766, b. 1680, d. 1763

Family

Richard Omohundro b. 1709, d. 1756
Last Edited29 Jan 2019
     Norma Joanne Tansley was born in 1680 in Westmoreland County, Virginia Colony. I have a real problem with this date of birth which makes her 29 years older than her husband; this does not make sense for this time period.1

     Norma Joanne Tansley married Richard Omohundro, son of Richard Omohundro, before 1733.1,2

     Norma Joanne Omohundro died in 1763 in Virginia Colony.
     Find A Grave does not have a burial listing for her as of 29 Jan 2019.1

Citations

  1. [S5572] Turner, Stephen Kent, e-mail message from (e-mail address) to Toby Turner at (e-mail address), dated 8 Jan 2017, containing Pedigree Charts for Ann Marie Omohundro and Samuel H. Turner.
  2. [S574] Omohundro, Malvern Hill. The Omohundro Genealogical Record : the Omohundros and allied families in America: blood lines traced from the first Omohundro in Westmoreland County, Virginia, 1670, through his descendants in three great branches and allied families down to 1950 (Staunton: McClure Print. Co., 1950-1951), page 100, says the name of his wife is unknown.

Ann E. Taylor1

F, #1636, b. circa 1852
Relationship2nd great-granddaughter of Terisha Turner
FatherJames C. Taylor1 b. c 1820, d. 29 Nov 1888
MotherAmanda J. Turner1 b. c 1824, d. 23 Jun 1885
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)
Last Edited10 Oct 2020
     Ann E. Taylor was born circa 1852, daughter of James C. Taylor and Amanda J. Turner, in Virginia.1

     I think she may be the Anna Bethel who died 10 Nov 1885 in Amherst County, Virginia, at the age of 34 of Consumption (making her born c1851). She is listed as the daughter of ? (looks like Chas) C & Amanda Taylor. The informant was T. H. Bethel, her husband.2

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
187018 years of ageAmherst County, Virginia1

Citations

  1. [S5500] "United States Census, 1870," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFL6-FL6 ), entry for James O Taylor, 1870, Amherst, Amherst, Virginia; cing page 81, household 584, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington, D. C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL Film 553,132, accessed 28 Sep 2019.
  2. [S6292] "Amherst County, Virginia Death Register, 1853-1896," image, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( Provo, Utah: accessed 10 Oct 2020), entry for Anna Bethel, 1885, at https://www.familysearch.org/records/images/image-details?page=1&place=393422&lifeEvent=102899&rmsId=TH-267-11122-64214-91&imageIndex=149&singleView=true.

Frances Rachel Taylor1,2

F, #23510, b. 23 October 1848, d. 1896

Family

William H. Douglass b. c 1846, d. 1925
Children
Last Edited31 Dec 2016
     Frances Rachel Taylor was born on 23 October 1848 in Tennessee.1,3

     Frances Rachel Taylor married William H. Douglass, son of Archibald Young Douglass and Martha Jane Morrow. According to Find A Grave, they had the following children (Henley is not listed): Eviline Douglas Simonton (1767-1913); Martha L. Douglas McCoy (1878-1905); Marvin Henderson Douglas (1881-1944); Ollie Ester Douglas Thompson (1887-1918); William W. Douglas (1888-1909); and Afra Douglas Cook (1891-1973).1

     Frances Rachel Douglass died in 18963 and was buried in Rock Springs Cemetery, Henderson County, Tennessee.3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
187021 years of ageDistrict 8, Henderson County, Tennessee1

Citations

  1. [S5500] "United States Census, 1870," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MDDW-9RN ), entry for William H Douglas household, 1870, 8th Civil District, Henderson, Tennessee, United States; citing page 11, family 78, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 553,036, accessed 27 Aug 2016.
  2. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Aug 2016, memorial page for William H "Bill" Douglas (1840-1925) at memorial page... Maintained by Record Hunter; citing Rock Springs Cemetery, Henderson County, Tennessee.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for Frances Rachel Taylor Douglas (1848-1896) at memorial page....

Henderson Taylor1

M, #23520, b. 12 March 1809, d. 5 August 1886

Family

Julia Lucindy Adams b. 18 Oct 1818, d. 5 Aug 1896
Child
Last Edited9 Feb 2019
     Henderson Taylor was born on 12 March 1809.2

     Henderson Taylor married Julia Lucindy Adams, daughter of Harman Adams, in 1836.3

     Henderson Taylor died on 5 August 1886 at age 772 and was buried in Coffman Cemetery, Parkers Crossroads, Henderson County, Tennessee.2

Citations

  1. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Aug 2016, memorial page for Julia Ann Taylor Douglas (1859-1951) at memorial page... Maintained by Record Hunter; citing Rock Springs Cemetery, Henderson County, Tennessee.
  2. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for Henderson Taylor (1809-1886) at memorial page....
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for Julia Lucindy Adams Taylor (1818-1896) at memorial page....

James C. Taylor1,2

M, #1149, b. circa 1820, d. 29 November 1888
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)

Family

Amanda J. Turner b. c 1824, d. 23 Jun 1885
Children
Last Edited19 Apr 2021
     James C. Taylor was born circa 1820 in Virginia.3
     James also is reported to have been born on 22 February 1800.4

     James and Amanda J. Turner obtained a marriage bond on 20 December 1847 in Amherst County, Virginia, with Samuel J. Turner as security.5,2
     The Marriage Return was received by the court in Amherst County, Virginia, on 20 December 1847.6

     James C. Taylor died on 29 November 18884 and was buried in Meade Cemetery, Madkson Heights, Amherst County, Virginia.4

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
185030 years of ageEastern District, Amherst County, Virginia3
Farmer3
187046 years of ageAmherst County, Virginia7
Farmer with real estate valued at $1,000 and personal property worth $3577
188063 years of age. Also living in his household was Eugene Beverly, Mulatto, age 13, farm handAmherst County, Virginia8
Farmer8

Citations

  1. [S4562] "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X5BS-M7Z, entry for Wm.D. Taylor, 31 Mar 1875; citing Courthouse Dis., Amherst County, Virginia, reference Item 1; FHL microfilm 2,056,972, accessed 15 Dec 2016).
  2. [S6294] "Amherst County, Virginia, Marriage Register, 1763-1853," image, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch (Provo, Utah): accessed 16 Oct 2020), entry for James C. Taylor and Amanda Turner, 1847, at https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9XF-NZZP?i=692 .
  3. [S5499] "1850 United States Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M88L-BYL ), entry for Jas C Taylor household, 1850, Amherst county, part of, Amherst, Virginia, United States; citing no page number, family 1052, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 29,708 (?), accessed 23 Jul 2016.
  4. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 28 Sep 2019, memorial page for James C. Taylor (1800-1888) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Mike, maintained by Mike; citing Meade Cemetery, Madison Heights, Amherst County, Virginia.
  5. [S2945] "Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XRDN-YZ7, entry for James C. Taylor and Amanda Turner, 20 Dec 1847; citing Amherst County, Virginia, reference p 404; FHL microfilm 30,273, accessed 28 Sep 2019).
  6. [S6294] "Amherst Co., VA Marriage Reg., 1763-1853," FamilySearch, entry for J C Taylor to A. Turner, 1847, accessed 19 Oct 2020), at https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-L9XF-N86H?i=774.
  7. [S5500] "United States Census, 1870," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFL6-FL6 ), entry for James O Taylor, 1870, Amherst, Amherst, Virginia; cing page 81, household 584, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington, D. C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL Film 553,132, accessed 28 Sep 2019.
  8. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCPF-L1V ), entry for James C Taylor, Amherst, Amherst, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 115B, household 68, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,255,353, accessed 28 Sep 2019.

Jewel F. Taylor1

F, #23784, b. October 1885, d. 4 August 1941

Family

Audie Turner b. 2 Feb 1884, d. 29 Nov 1953
Last Edited17 Jan 2021
     Jewel F. Taylor was born in October 1885 in Texas. She was the daughter of Henry Taylor, born Jan 1854 in Florida, married to Laura Taylor, born Jan 1862 in Alabama, married eighteen years. Laura had borne one child, Jewel.2

     Jewel F. Taylor, 15, married Audie Turner, 17, son of Albert Frazier Turner and Mary Elizabeth Lake, on 28 March 1901 in McCulloch County, Texas.1

     There must have been a divorce because both parties remarried in 1906.

     On 14 January 1906, she married A. P. Ross at Erath County, Texas.3
     She was also known as Ross.

     Jewel F. Ross died on 4 August 1941 at age 55 in Stephens County, Texas.
     Find a Grave does not have a memorial page for her as of 17 Jan 2021.4

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190014 years of ageJustice Precinct 6, McCulloch County, Texas2
191025 years of age and living with her husband, Drew, and step-daughter Edna Turner, age 8, and her twin sons, age 2Dublin, Erath County, Texas5

Citations

  1. [S5565] McCulloch County, Texas Marriages, Grooms Beginning with T, online (http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~txmccull/MarriagesT.htm), accessed 7 Sep 2016, site verified as active 3 Jun 2019, citing B-40.
  2. [S5786] "1900 United States Federal Census," index and images, Ancestry.com ( Provo, Utah): accessed 17 Jan 2021), Jewel Taylor in the household of Henry Taylor, 1900, McCulloch, Texas; citing page 14, family 241, FHL microfilm 1,241,655.
  3. [S6211] "Texas, Select County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," index, (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.: (Provo, Utah), accessed 17 Jan 2021, entry for A P Ross and Jewell Turner, 1906, Erath County.
  4. [S6121] "Texas, Death Index, 1903-2000," index, (Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.: (Provo, Utah), accessed 17 Jan 2021, entry for Jewell Ross, 1941, Stephens, Cert. 39210.
  5. [S5973] "1910 United States Federal Census," index and images, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc: (Provo, Utah), accessed 17 Jan 2021, entry for Jewel Ross in the household of Drew Ross, 1900, Dublin, Erath, Texas; citing roll T624_1550, page 14A, family 298, FHL microfilm 1,375,563, image 7 of 14; citing original data from the National Archives & Records Administration.

Julia Ann Taylor1,2

F, #23509, b. 31 August 1859, d. 4 July 1951
FatherHenderson Taylor3 b. 12 Mar 1809, d. 5 Aug 1886
MotherJulia Lucindy Adams3 b. 18 Oct 1818, d. 5 Aug 1896

Family

James M. Douglass b. 9 Apr 1849, d. 7 Jan 1902
Last Edited20 Nov 2016
     Julia Ann Taylor was born on 31 August 1859, daughter of Henderson Taylor and Julia Lucindy Adams, in Tennessee.1,3

     Julia Ann Taylor married James M. Douglass, son of Archibald Young Douglass and Martha Jane Morrow. They had two known children, according to Find A Grave: Cornelious Douglas, (1884-1962); and Arrie Ell Douglas Leslie (1886-1968).1

     Julia Ann Douglass died on 4 July 1951 at age 913 and was buried in Rock Springs Cemetery, Henderson County, Tennessee.3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
188021 years of ageDistrict 8, Henderson County, Tennessee1

Citations

  1. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MD7F-SFF ), entry for J M Douglass household, 1880, District 8, Henderson, Tennessee, United States; citing enumeration district ED 53, sheet 293C, household 175, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 1,255,262, accessed 27 Aug 2016.
  2. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Aug 2016, memorial page for James J "J M" Douglas (1849-1902) at memorial page... Maintained by Record Hunter; citing Rock Springs Cemetery, Henderson County, Tennessee.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for Julia Ann Taylor Douglas (1859-1951) at memorial page....

Sarah J. Taylor1

F, #1635, b. circa 1867
Relationship2nd great-granddaughter of Terisha Turner
FatherJames C. Taylor1 b. c 1820, d. 29 Nov 1888
MotherAmanda J. Turner1 b. c 1824, d. 23 Jun 1885
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)

Family

William Fletcher Moore b. 11 Sep 1861, d. 31 Mar 1947
Last Edited28 Sep 2019
     Sarah J. Taylor was born circa 1867, daughter of James C. Taylor and Amanda J. Turner, in Virginia.1

     Sarah J. Taylor married William Fletcher Moore, 26, on 30 November 1887 in Amherst County, Virginia.2

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18703 years of ageAmherst County, Virginia3
188013 years of ageAmherst County, Virginia1

Citations

  1. [S5497] "United States 1880 Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MCPF-L1V ), entry for James C Taylor, Amherst, Amherst, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district ED 15, sheet 115B, household 68, NARA microfilm publication T9 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), FHL microfilm 1,255,353, accessed 28 Sep 2019.
  2. [S2945] "Virginia Marriages, 1785-1940," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XRD7-SNK, entry for Wm. Fletcher Moore and Sallie J. Taylor, 30 Nov 1887; citing Amherst, Virginia, reference Mar Reg 3 p 173; FHL microfilm 30,311, accessed 13 Dec 2016).
  3. [S5500] "United States Census, 1870," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:MFL6-FL6 ), entry for James O Taylor, 1870, Amherst, Amherst, Virginia; cing page 81, household 584, NARA microfilm publication M593 (Washington, D. C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL Film 553,132, accessed 28 Sep 2019.

Septembus Louis Taylor1,2,3

M, #26643, b. January 1857, d. 24 January 1934

Family

Elizabeth K. London b. Jan 1870, d. 1939
Last Edited2 Jun 2021
     Septembus Louis Taylor was born in January 1857 in Kentucky.2
     He also is reported to have been born on 30 January 1865.3

     Septembus, 30, married Elizabeth K. London, 17, daughter of John A. London and Paulina Shelton Turner, on 1 September 1887 in Butler County, Kentucky.1

     Septembus Louis Taylor died on 24 January 1934 in Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky,3 and was buried in Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky.3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190043 years of age and married thirteen years. Children: Noble, born May 1894, age 6; and Lallah K. Rooch, born Aug 1896, age 3Morgantown, Butler County, Kentucky2
Farmer2

Citations

  1. [S6343] "Kentucky, County Marriage Records, 1783-1965," index and images, (Ancestry.com Operations Inc.: (Provo, Utah), accessed 1 Jun 2021, entry for S. L. Taylor and Elizabeth London, 1 Sep 1887, Butler County, 1887-1891, FHL microfilm 928,053, image 305 of 528.
  2. [S5786] "1900 United States Federal Census," index and images, Ancestry.com ( Provo, Utah): accessed 1 Jun 2021), Septimons L Taylor, 1900, Morgantown, Butler, Kentucky; citing page 13, family 263, FHL microfilm 1,240,511.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 1 Jun 2021, memorial page for Septembus Louis "S. L." Taylor Jr (1865-1934) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by L L Logan, maintained by TColley, originally created by Betty Wakeland; citing Maple Grove Cemetery, Russellville, Logan County, Kentucky.

William D. Taylor1,2

M, #23055, b. circa 1848, d. 31 March 1875
Relationship2nd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherJames C. Taylor1,2 b. c 1820, d. 29 Nov 1888
MotherAmanda J. Turner3 b. c 1824, d. 23 Jun 1885
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)
Last Edited28 Sep 2019
     William D. Taylor was born circa 1848, son of James C. Taylor and Amanda J. Turner, in Virginia.1,2

     William D. Taylor died on 31 March 1875 in Court House District, Amherst County, Virginia.
     Find A Grave does not have a burial listing for him as of 23 Jan 2019.4

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18502 years of ageAmherst County, Virginia3
18502 years of ageEastern District, Amherst County, Virginia1

Citations

  1. [S5499] "1850 United States Federal Census," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M88L-BYL ), entry for Jas C Taylor household, 1850, Amherst county, part of, Amherst, Virginia, United States; citing no page number, family 1052, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL microfilm 29,708 (?), accessed 23 Jul 2016.
  2. [S4562] "Virginia Deaths and Burials, 1853-1912," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (FamilySearch: https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X5BS-M7Z, entry for Wm.D. Taylor, 31 Mar 1875; citing Courthouse Dis., Amherst County, Virginia, reference Item 1; FHL microfilm 2,056,972, accessed 15 Dec 2016).
  3. [S5499] "1850 U.S. Census," Jas C Taylor, Amherst county, part of, Amherst, Virginia, United States; citing family 1052, NARA microfilm publication M432 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.); FHL Microfilm 29,708, accessed 28 Sep 2019 at ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M88L-BYL ).
  4. [S4562] "VA Deaths & Burials 1853-1912," FamilySearch, Wm.D. Taylor, 31 Mar 1875; citing Courthouse Dis., Amherst County, Virginia, reference Item 1; FHL microfilm 2,056,972, accessed 15 Dec 2016. States his mother was the daughter of John and Sallie Turner.

Mary Juhan Teal1,2

F, #9912, b. 19 April 1891, d. 19 July 1976

Family

Percy Lee Turner b. 10 Aug 1888, d. 29 Nov 1971
Children
Last Edited1 Jun 2021
     Mary Juhan Teal was born on 19 April 1891 in Elgin, Bastrop County, Texas. She was the daughter of Thomas Henry Teal (1856-1925) and Hester Cornelia Chapman (1868-1924.)1,3

     Mary and Percy Lee Turner were married on 5 March 1913 at Dallas County, Texas.1,4

     Mary Juhan Teal, 21, married Percy Lee Turner, 24, son of Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner and Dora Anna Shuford, on 6 March 1913 in Dallas County, Texas, with Percy's father, S. W. Turner, Minister of the Gospel, officiating.5

     On 9 April 1930, she may be the wife enumerated in the 1930 census on this day at 3408 Harvard Ave, Highland Park, Dallas County, Texas,as being 37 and married for the first time at age 20. However, her name is illegible.6

     On 29 November 1971, Percy Lee Turner's obituary says his wife's surname was Teal, not Lex as some websites have it. Two children are listed: J. L. Turner and (Mrs.) W. F. Riddle.7

     Mary Juhan Turner died on 19 July 1976 at age 85 in Odessa, Ector County, Texas,3 and was buried in Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
19009 years of ageGeorgetown, Williamson County, Texas8
192028 years of ageDallas, Dallas County, Texas1
1940as Juhan and 47 years of ageHighland Park, Dallas County, Texas9

Citations

  1. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 57, Sheet 3A, dwelling 46, family 50, Thoms H [?] household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T625, Roll 1793, page 191A. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  2. [S2855] "Texas Birth Certificates, 1903-1935," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X2JQ-4GM: accessed 18 Aug 2016), Beverly Teal Turner, 23 Oct 1918; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, United States, certificate 51322, Bureau of Vital Statistics. State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 4,491,056.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 2 Oct 2019, memorial page for Mary Juhan Teal Turner (1891-1975) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Sherry, maintained by Sherry; citing Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.
  4. [S5592] "Texas, Select County Marriage Records, 1837-2015," index and images, (Ancestry.com: (Provo, Utah), accessed 9 Feb 2021, entry for P. L. Turner and Mary Juhan Teal, Cert. No. 12885 5074, image 477 of 1069. Index wrote her first name as May, but I read it as Mary.
  5. [S5592] "TX, Select Co. Marriages, 1837-2015," index and images, Ancestry.com, entry for P. L. Turner and Mary Juhan Teal, Cert. No. 12885 5074, image 477 of 1069.
  6. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Highland Park Township, Enumeration District (ED) 57-97, Sheet 32B, dwelling 347, family 347, Percy L. Turner household, digital images, citing National Archives microfilm T626, Roll 2321, page 88. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  7. [S5995] "Percy Lee Turner," The Odessa American, Ancestry.com Obituary Index, 29 Nov 1971, online https://www.newspapers.com/image/298179872/?article=8a0c1cb0-aac1-4bf3-aca2-54aa0815f73d&focus=0.8580002,0.21754228,0.9875458,0.34895885&xid=2378, accessed 1 Oct 2019.
  8. [S5503] "United States Census, 1900," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M35T-6RY ): accessed 14 Oct 2019), Thomas H Teel, Justice Precinct 1 Georgetown, Williamson, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 123, sheet 17B, family 340, NARA microfilm publication T623 (Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1972.); FHL microfilm 1,241,679.
  9. [S3273] "1940 United States Federal Census," digital images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KWJ2-FZS ): accessed 2 Oct 2019), Percy Turner, Tract D4, Highland Park, Justice Precinct 1, Dallas, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 57-5B, sheet 2B, line 41, family 40, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 - 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 4015.