William Franklin Turner1

M, #256, b. 7 January 1875, d. 12 March 1920
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner2,3 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford2,3 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916
William Franklin Turner
(courtesy of Elisabeth Turner Alford)

Family

Eula Leta Swinburne b. 25 Mar 1875, d. 6 Sep 1948
Last Edited19 May 2020
     William Franklin Turner was born on 7 January 1875 in Tyler, Smith County, Texas,4,5 and was baptized by Reverend R. S. Finley. He was also known as Willie F.4

     William Franklin Turner married Eula Leta Swinburne, daughter of Alvin Curtis Swinburn and Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert, circa 1897.6

     Leslie Turner stated that his father met his mother at Tolbert, Wilbarger County, Texas, a town near Vernon that no longer really exists. The town's original name was Wheatland, but because there already was another Texas town with that name, its name was changed to Tolbert before he was six years old.

     He further said that his grandfather, Stephen W. Turner, had been the minister (the implication was that he was the original minister) of a church there. This may have been the first Methodist church in Wilbarger County. At that time Tolbert had a railroad station, church, school and several houses. At the time, the Swinburns farmed about 3 miles outside of Tolbert and, later, Alva Swinburn was a builder in Vernon.

     In 1909, according to his son, Leslie Turner, he moved his family to Wichita Falls where, partly due to the oil boom, he had an abstract office that employed 20 secretaries.

     However, this does not match the news story regarding his death which stated he was the manager of an abstract office, not the owner.

     William Franklin Turner left a will dated on 21 February 1920 in Wichita County, Texas. The date the will was written was sworn to in Court by W. R. Hyer, one of the witnesses.7,8

     He was Manager, Guarantee Title Abstract Company

     Leslie Turner stated that his father was a Realtor, as well as having an abstract office in Vernon near the Swinburns.9

     Prior to William Franklin's death (based on his death certificate), the family was living at Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas. [I wonder about this giving that I always knew them as living at 1610 Twelfth St., but perhaps they'd moved and kept that house as a rental. After his death his wife may have had to return to the earlier house.]4

     William Franklin Turner died of acute perionitis, with the secondary cause the performation of his sigmoid colon during removal of right kidney cysts in his kidney (certified by an autopsy) on 12 March 1920 at age 45 in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas,9,4,5 and was buried on 12 March 1920 in Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas.
     I personally visited and photographed his burial location in the family plot where later his wife, two daughters and their husbands were also buried.5,4

     Elisabeth Turner (his daughter) told me he died of peritonitis following a gall bladder operation. Elisabeth told me that she was only three when he died. In fact, she was 5 years of age. I was always told he died from complications following an emergency appendectomy.

     In the brief news story of his sudden, unexpected death, it states that funeral arrangements will be announced later.9 After a careful search of later newspapers on microfilm at the Wichita Falls Public Library (on July 6, 2004), I was unable to find an true obituary.

     Leslie Turner stated to me that his father's death was so unexpected that his widow was persuaded to have an autopsy performed. Apparently, during the operation a kink was formed in his intestine, causing the infection that led to his sudden death.

     His estate was probated on 22 June 1920 in Wichita County, Texas. Although there isn't a date stating when this will was signed, the abstract says it was probated on this date. His wife, Mrs. Eula L. Turner, was named Executrix. The legatees were his unnamed children.

No. 838
     Now comes your petitioner, Eula L. Turner, and respectfully shows to the Court that she resides in Wichita County, Texas; that W. F. Turner is dead; that he died on or about the 12 day of March, A. D. 1920, at Dallas, in the County of Dallas, State of Texas, during a temporary absence from his residence; that said deceased at the time of his death was a resident of the County of Wichita, in the State of Texas.
     That at the time of his death the said W. F. urner was seized and possessed of real and personal property of the probable value of $50,000.00, located in Wichita County, Texas, and left a written will, duly executed and herewith filed in which your petitioner was appointed independent executrix without bond.
     That your petitioner is not disqualified by law from accepting letters testamentary.
     Wherefore, your petitioner prays the court that citation be issued to all parties interested in said estate as required by law, that said will be admitted to probate, that letters testamentary be issued to your petitioner, and that such other and further orders be made as to the court may seem proper.
                              Carrigan, Montgomery, Britain & Morgan
                                   Attorneys for Petitioner
Filed June 22, 1920
W. T. Harris County Clerk
By M. F. Yeager Deputy

     The Sheriff's Return and Affidavit of Publication were filed October 19, 1920. The will was proven on 9 Oct by the oath of W. R. Hyer who stated that on the 21st of February, A. D. 1920, he was present and saw W. F. Turner sign the instrument filed in this court on the 22nd day of June. It was on the 8th of October that Eula came into court to be heard on the probate of this will.10,11,12

     William Franklin Turner's estate was inventoried and appraised by the Court on 21 October 1920 at Wichita County, Texas, The total value (by my calculations) was $37,999.50 (worth $437,098.18 in 2013 dollars).13

     On 9 December 1920, an Affidavit of Heirship was filed in court at Wichita County, Texas.

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18805 years of ageHenderson, Rusk County, Texas2
1900as Willie F., is 25 years of age and reports being married for three yearsCisco, Eastland County, Texas6
Clerk in a Grocery Store who owns his home free of mortgage6
191035 years of age [indexed omproperly on HeritageQuest for some reason, but found him on ancestry.com where it was easy]Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas14
Abstracter in an Abstract Office who rents his home.14
192044 years of ageWichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas15
Abstractor and an employer15

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Rusk County, Texas, population schedule, Henderson Township, Enumeration District (ED) 72, Sheet 12, dwelling 104, family 112, S. W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JFBM-6BF : accessed 19 Dec 2012), Willie F. Turner, 12 Mar 1920; citing Texas, United States, reference 9715, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,073,750.
  4. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Willie F. Turner, 12 Mar 1920; citing Texas, United States, reference 9715, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,073,750, accessed 19 Dec 2012. Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 2954 of 3378 to see it.
  5. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Sep 2012, memorial page for William Franklin "Willie" Turner (1875-1920) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Toby, maintained by ProgBase; citing Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  6. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 61, Sheet 11, dwelling 212, family 213, Willie F Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  7. [S3768] "Texas Probate Records, 1800-1990, " images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:image 102 of 882, page 47 ), W. F. Turner, 1920, citing Wichita County, Minutes 1920-1924, vol. 8 : accessed 28 Apr 2014.
  8. [S5896] "Texas, Wills and Probate Records, 1833-1974," index and images, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., (Provo, Utah) accessed 5 Jul 2019, entry for W. F. Turner, Wichita County Probate Minutes, Vol 7-10, 1920-1924, image 105 of 882. Original data: Texas County, District and Probate Courts.
  9. [S832] "W.F. Turner Dies in Dallas Friday," Wichita Falls Daily Times, Column 3, 14 Mar 1920.
  10. [S1071] Hodges, Frances Beal Smith. Abstracts of Wills, Wichita County, Texas (Wichita Falls, Texas: Buchanan Stationery Co., 1958), W. F. Turner will No. 95.
  11. [S1664] Major Frances Grice Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, compiler. Texas, Wichita County, Wills, 1882-1927, FHL Film 0,850,134 #8, microreproduction of original typescript (74 p.) written in 1958. W. F. Turner will #95.
  12. [S3768] "TX Probate Recds., 1800-1990," FamilySearch, W. F. Turner, 1920, citing Wichita County, Minutes 1920-1924, vol. 8, images 102 of 882, pages 46-47 at https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99QS-VJT9?mode=g&i=101&wc=M4FS-JM9%3A337779301%2C338200401&cc=2016287, accessed 28 Apr 2014.
  13. [S3768] "TX Probate Recds., 1800-1990," FamilySearch, W. F. Turner, 1920, citing Wichita County, Minutes 1920-1924, vol. 8, image 103 of 882, pages 48-49 at https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-99QS-VJT9?mode=g&i=101&wc=M4FS-JM9%3A337779301%2C338200401&cc=2016287, accessed 28 Apr 2014.
  14. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Wichita Falls Township, Enumeration District (ED) 225, Sheet 2B, dwelling 35, family 39, William F. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  15. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 120, Sheet 4A, dwelling 78, family 84, William F Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Eula Leta Swinburne

F, #257, b. 25 March 1875, d. 6 September 1948
FatherAlvin Curtis Swinburn1,2 b. 15 Nov 1845, d. 11 May 1920
MotherNancy Elizabeth Gilbert2 b. 15 Oct 1848, d. 5 Dec 1927

Family

William Franklin Turner b. 7 Jan 1875, d. 12 Mar 1920
Last Edited7 Dec 2018
     Eula Leta Swinburne was born on 25 March 1875, daughter of Alvin Curtis Swinburn and Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert, in Mexia, Limestone County, Texas.

     Eula Leta Swinburne also is reported to have been born on 25 March 1878 in Texas.3

     Eula Leta Swinburne married William Franklin Turner, son of Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner and Dora Anna Shuford, circa 1897.4

     Elisabeth remembers that her mother was unprepared to handle business matters at the time of her husband's death. J. S. Bridwell, a prominent Wichita Falls businessman, was helpful to her. She was smart and caught on quickly, however she had a hard time during the Depression when loans her husband had made were not repaid. She took in boarders during this time.

     Elisabeth says her mother was inclined to be artistic. She particularly liked to make doll clothes. Unfortunately, Elisabeth was not particularly interested in dolls.5

     She'd lived at 1610 12th Street in Wichita Falls for 39 years.2

     Eula Leta Turner died of cerebral hemorrahge which had occurred 6 years previously on 6 September 1948 at age 73 in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas,2 and was buried on 9 September 1948 in Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas.
     I photographed this tombstone during a visit to the family plot. I verified the date of death of 6 Sep 1948 on her tombstone on July 6, 2004 which MUST be in error as she was buried, according to her death certificate, on 9 Dec. I was surprised to find that no obituary had been sent to the newspapers. I carefully read all the microfilm for the dates immediately after death.2,6

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1880as [?]ula and 3 years of ageSpringfield & Tehuacana Precincts, Limestone County, Texas7
190022 years of age and reports having borne two children, both of whom are livingCisco, Eastland County, Texas4
191032 years of age, married for thirteen years and having borne three children of whom two are livingWichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas8
192041 years of ageWichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas9
193052 years of age, widowed, owns her home valued at $7,000 and owns a radio set. No occupation is listed. Also living in her household was a Boarder, Pearl Crenshaw, age 37, who was a Public School TeacherWichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas10

Citations

  1. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, Enumeration District (ED) 95, Sheet 14, dwelling 109, family 117, A. C Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JD2J-6YJ : accessed 19 Dec 2012), Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966.
  3. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966, accessed 19 Dec 2012. This is also the date shown on her tombstone.
  4. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 61, Sheet 11, dwelling 212, family 213, Willie F Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  5. [S875] Interview with Elisabeth Turner Alford (Wichita Falls, Texas), by Toby Turner, October 13-14, 1999. Library of Toby Turner (Houston, Harris County, Texas).
  6. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 7 Dec 2018, memorial page for Eula Leeta Swinburn Turner (1878-1948) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Toby, maintained by ProgBase; citing Riverside Cemetery, Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  7. [S677] "1880 U. S. Census," Limestone County, Texas, pop. sch., Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, ED 95, Sheet 14, dwell. 109, fam. 117, A. C Swinburn household, Roll 1317, page 376B.
  8. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Wichita Falls Township, Enumeration District (ED) 225, Sheet 2B, dwelling 35, family 39, William F. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  9. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 120, Sheet 4A, dwelling 78, family 84, William F Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  10. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Wichita County, Texas, population schedule, Wichita Falls Township, Enumeration District (ED) 243-16, Sheet 1A, dwelling 6, family 7, Eula Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Alvin Curtis Swinburn1,2

M, #258, b. 15 November 1845, d. 11 May 1920
FatherEdwin N. Swinburne3 b. 13 Sep 1813, d. 9 Sep 1905
MotherMartha Ann O'Neal2 b. 15 Dec 1829, d. 18 Dec 1899
A. C. and Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert Swiniburn (seated)
Left to right: Matthew, Eula, Oscar, and Vinnie
(photo courtesy of Joy Turner Luke)

Family

Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert b. 15 Oct 1848, d. 5 Dec 1927
Child
Last Edited3 Jul 2019
     Alvin Curtis Swinburn was born on 15 November 1845, son of Edwin N. Swinburne and Martha Ann O'Neal, in Salem, Marion County, Illinois. His death certificate says he was born in Tennessee (as it states was his father which we know to be incorrect), and gives his mother's maiden name as Jones, also born in Tennessee. I believe this is in error. The informant was Oscar Swinburn who has given incorrect information in the past.4,5,6 He was also known as Alva C. Swinburn.

     In various documents, his name is reported as Alva C., and in others, Alvin C. His name is shown as Alvin on the 1860 census. I was always told the middle name was Charles, but the documents that list his middle name and his tombstone, state it to have been Curtis. Apparently, he was called Alva by his father and, perhaps, by his family as well.

     Alvin Curtis Swinburn was educated in 1858 where his name is on the list of students, along with his brother, John, and his sister, Jemima.7

     Alva C. Swinburn began military service on 1 February 1862 by enlisting in Company H, 4th Regiment, Texas Cavalry at the age of 17. He later served in Company A, Texas 17th Calvary, as well as in Arnold's Company as a Texas Infantry Rifleman.

     In the compiled service records of Texas Confederate soldiers, Alva is shown as being enrolled in Company A, 17th Texas Cavalry, Moore's Regiment at age 17 by T. J. Johnson. He mustered at Camp Likins on 12 Mar 1862 for a period of 12 months. The number of miles to the rendezvous point was 70. His horse was valued at $170 and his personal equipment at $25. He is shown on the company muster roll from Feb to 30 Jun 1862. 8

     In his own words, Alva says:
          "(I) enlisted in the Confederate Army at Nacogdoches, Tex., as private in Company A, Seventeenth Texas Cavalry (Consolidated), Polignac's Brigade, Mouton's Division. My first Captain was Hancock, and first Colonel, Taylor."9

     He performed his Military Service after 1 February 1862 as a Rifleman in Arnold's Company, Texas Infantry and in Company A, Texas 17th Cavalry.

     Because he was in service with his father some of the time, I've not found any letters from him. However, I found a letter in an unpublished collection from Laurence Taylor to his father, Chas. S. Taylor, dated July 18, 1862 in which he mentions Alva. Because the letter paint a compelling portrait of the difficulties of serving in the Confederacy, I've decided to reproduce it in its entirety:

"Letter from Laurence Taylor to Chas. S. Taylor, July l2, 1862.
     Little Rock, Ark., July 18th, 1862.
     Dear Pa:

          I wrote to Amelia yesterday but haven't had. an opportunity to mail it yet. I have been looking very anxiously for some time for a letter from home, (but nary letter yet I have seen the Elephant at last. In the last 8 weeks I have undergone hardships and privations as many as a person of my weak constitution and retired habits can well bear up under. During the whole time there hasn't been 3 days that we eat three meals a day. I am so used to it now that one good meal a day is as much as I care for. When I had any money I could. do very well, then I could buy. On the 13th inst. we was dismounted and our horses were sent home by a detail of 5 men from each company; mine & Henry's will be sent by the nonconscripts. Swinburn is going to take mine. A great many of Boys of the Brigade are deserting, and I don't blame them a bit, for we are treated worse than negroes (sic). We are allowed no privileges at all. Gen. Hindman made a speech yesterday to the boys, and in his speech he said that he learned that some of the soldiers had been stealing Roasting Ears that had to be stopped, and he would make it his business to stop it, and if he heard or saw any soldier with Roasting Ears he would have him hung if he had to do it with his own hands, and he said he would allow no soldier to buy none. I am happy to say that his orders concerning the corn is not respected; they buy and steal them every chance.

     July 20th.
          We left camp at Little Rock yesterday at 8 o'clock, and marched 20 miles without anything to eat, and through the hot sun, and some without water. Bill Hooks of our Company fainted, and one man in the Brigade fell in the road perfectly senseless. He was thought to be sun-struck. When we left camps we were told we had only to go 8 miles up the river, but I found it to be a rather lengthy 8 miles. I got into camp about sun-down as near broke down as I ever want to be again. Some of the Regiment didn't get up during the night. Such long marches and through the hot sun will certainly make us sick. At our present encampment I think, from the preparations, we will remain here some time. We are having wells dug and are going to build a Hospital. We will begin clearing off the drill ground in the morning. We will smell thunder; I think I kinder smelt it yesterday about 12 o'clock.

          On the 7th inst. we had another fight, but it didn't terminate as our other fights did; all the running was on our side. Our Regiment didn't get into it. I would rather have been in the fight than to have done the rapid marching we did do. Our Regiment came very near being cut off; we only missed it by a few minutes. We got to White river about 8 o'clock in the night; it then took us until day to swim all our horses. We couldn't think of ferrying them and 20,000 Yankees after us. None but 3 regiments of our brigade was in the fight, and they held their ground very well against such odds. I acted as Sergeant Major on the day of the fight, and the Col. was so well pleased with me that he appointed me the next day, but since we have been dismounted, I requested the Col. to confer the honor upon somebody else. The duties of the office are too fatiguing. I never had any rest hardly, neither night nor day, and it's a very unpleasant position. You are cursed by everybody. I had the guard to detail. The first guard I detailed, me and an Orderly Sergeant came near fighting.
               I have been very busy today writing discharges; about half of our company are being discharged. The Conscrip exempts Public Millers; you may look for me in a few days (over the left.) You all must write oftener. I haven't received a letter from home in a month.

          I am going to send my pony by Alva Swinburn. Tell William he had better give over the idea of joining the Army.

     Your son,
     Laurence."10

     On July 27, 1966, someone requested a photocopy of Alva C. Swinborn's papers, receipt No. 21815. The following is a true copy of the photocopy:

     I CERTIFY, That the within named Alva C. Swinburn a private of Captain Sebron M. Nobles Company A of the 17th regiment of Texas Cavalry, born in Posy County, in the State of Indiana, aged 17 years, 5 feet, 4 inches high, fair complexion, blue eyes, light hair, and by occupation a Bricklayer was enlisted by Capt. Theo(?) I (?) Johnson at Nacogdoches Texas on the 1st day of February 1862, to serve one year, and is now entitled to discharge by reason of (word illegible but might be Conscrip-something) He being under eighteen years of age.

     The said Alva C. Swinburn was last paid by Capt. J. Field, to include the 30th day of June 186?, and has pay due from that date to the present date.

     There is due to him forty-five Dollars traveling allowance from Little Rock, Arkansas, the place of discharge to Nacogdoches Texas, the place of enrollment, transportation not being furnished in kind.

     There is due him for services fourteen 16/100 dollars.

     He is indebted to the Confederate States (line left blank) dollars on account of (line left black).

     Given in duplicate at Little Rock, this 17th day of July, 1862.
               J. B. G(illegible)            S. N. Nobles
               (Illegible) 17th Regt. Texas (illegible) Cavalry

     For pay from 1st of July 1862, to 17th of July (illegible) 1862, being 17 days at Twenty five dollars per month,
For pay for travelling from Little Rock Ark to Nacogdoches Texas, being 350 miles, at ten cents per mile, and 40 cts for each 20 miles.

     [The sums were totaled on the right side of the page 14.16 plus 42.00 = $56.16

Received of Capt. Julian Fuldagm C. S. Army this 10th day of August 1862, Fifty Six dollars, and 16 cents, in full of the above amount.
                    (Signed duplicates)            Alva C. Swinburn
               Witness           S. M. Nobles (illegible).11

     On 5 May 1862, Company C was at Bossier Parish, Louisiana.12

     On 29 May 1862, Company C was at Holly Springs, Dallas County, Arkansas.13

     On 4 June 1862, Company C was at Austin, Travis County, Texas. On the 10th, they were at Searcy and on the 16th in Van Buren County, Arkansas.14

     On 1 July 1862, Company C was back at Searcy, White County, Arkansas,and on the 29th, they were at Crystal Hill, 12 miles north of Little Rock.15

     On 4 August 1862, they were at Camp Crystal, Arkansas, as they were on the 11th. On the 29th, Company C was at Camp Hope Arkansas.16

     On 19 August 1862, "Voucher #165
          Paid 19th day Aug 1862
          Pvt. Alva C. Swinburn
          Co. A, 17th Regiment Texas Cavalry
          From 1st day July 1862
          To 19th day July 1862
          Pay $56.16
          Forage
          Account $56.16.17

     On 29 August 1862, Company C was encamped at Camp Nelson, Arkansas.18 Captain Marsh wrote his wife that no men from Company C were lost until October 16th, when B. F. Massy was killed.19

     On 1 December 1862, Company C was encamped at Arkansas Post, after leaving 10 to 12 men at Camp Nelson who were too sick to travel.19 Captain Marsh wrote his wife on the 10th and again on the 21st when he reported that four men from Company C had died.20

     On 9 January 1863, the Battle of Arkansas Post, also known as the Battle of Fort Hindman, began. This was a Civil War battle fought January 9–11, 1863, as Union troops under Major General John A. McClernand sought to stop Confederate harassment of Union shipping on the Arkansas River and possibly to mount an offensive against the Arkansas capital at Little Rock (Pulaski County).

     In the fall of 1862, Confederate officials ordered construction of fortifications on the Arkansas River. They selected high ground at a horseshoe bend in the river near the territorial-era village of Arkansas Post (Arkansas County) and constructed a large, square, heavily armed fortification. It was called Post of Arkansas by Confederates and Fort Hindman by the Union side. Brigadier General Thomas J. Churchill assumed command of the Post of Arkansas in December. In late December, Rebel troops captured the steamer the Blue Wing on the Mississippi River and sent it and its cargo of armaments to Churchill’s garrison at Arkansas Post.

     Meanwhile, Major General John A. McClernand, an Illinois politician turned soldier, assumed command of a Union expeditionary force under Major General William T. Sherman, which had just suffered a repulse at Chickasaw Bluffs, Mississippi. McClernand, having heard of the capture of the Blue Wing, determined to use these troops and a flotilla of Union warships under Rear Admiral David D. Porter to attack Fort Hindman to protect the shipping and lines of communications of the Union army.

     Despite the Union forces starting their trip on the Arkansas River by way of the White River Cutoff to avoid discovery by the Confederates, the Rebels were aware of the Union flotilla by the afternoon of January 9, 1863. Churchill ordered troops to a line of rifle pits about two miles north of Fort Hindman to hinder the Union advance. McClernand landed troops at Nortrebe’s Plantation on the north bank of the river about three miles south of the Post of Arkansas and other Union troops on the south side of the Arkansas River.

     Thousands of Union troops had disembarked at Nortrebe’s Plantation by 11:00 a.m. on January 10 and begun advancing toward Fort Hindman. Churchill ordered his forward units to fall back to the Post of Arkansas at 2:00 p.m. The Confederate position was anchored by the fort on the banks of the Arkansas River. The position was supported by a line of rifle pits west of Fort Hindman that ended near the Post Bayou, which helped prevent a flanking movement against the Confederate left. Most of the Texas and Arkansas troops under Churchill’s command occupied the rifle pits as the Union troops reached their assault positions at about 5:30 p.m. Union gunboats led by the ironclads the Baron DeKalb, the Louisville, and the Cincinnati then moved against Fort Hindman, hammering the fort’s big guns and killing most of the Confederate artillery’s horses in and around the fort. By the time the naval bombardment was complete, it was too dark for the Union army to attack. Union troops spent the night listening to the Confederates chopping down trees to strengthen their defensive positions.

     McClernand and his commanders spent the morning of January 11 arranging the 32,000 soldiers of the Army of the Mississippi for an assault against the strengthened bulwarks shielding the 4,900-man garrison of the Post of Arkansas. At 1:00 p.m., Porter again advanced the Union gunboats against Fort Hindman. He was aided by Union artillery that had been landed on the south side of the river and moved to where it could sweep the fort with artillery fire from across the Arkansas River. By 4:00 p.m., the guns of Fort Hindman were silenced.

     The Union infantry, meanwhile, had moved up against the Confederate lines. Troops on the Union right were fiercely engaged with the Arkansas and Texas troops defending the rifle pits. Other Union troops in the army’s center advanced against the Texans immediately west of the fort and engaged in a firefight that caused more than one-third of the Union’s losses. At about 4:30 p.m., as McClernand prepared to order a final, massive assault on the defenders of the Post of Arkansas, white flags appeared along the Confederate lines. Though Churchill denied issuing orders to give up and many of the Texans were fiercely resistant to capitulation, the garrison of Fort Hindman surrendered to McClernand’s army. Federal casualties were reported as 134 killed, 898 wounded, and 29 missing; incomplete Confederate reports showed 60 killed and 80 wounded, with 4,791 of the garrison captured.

     The Rebel prisoners were loaded onto transports and sent up the Mississippi River to prison camps on January 12. McClernand’s troops razed Fort Hindman and gathered the spoils of the Confederate garrison, including many of the armaments that had been captured on the Blue Wing. McClernand ordered a sortie up the Arkansas River to South Bend, Arkansas, to destroy stores of corn accessible to Confederates. On January 14, he sent a memorandum to Sherman and Porter stating that he planned to move up the river against Little Rock (Pulaski County) and other Rebel concentrations in central Arkansas. General Ulysses S. Grant, however, countermanded the plan and ordered the Army of the Mississippi to rejoin the main Union offensive against Vicksburg, Mississippi.

     The defeat at Arkansas Post cost Confederate Arkansas fully one-fourth of its armed forces in the largest surrender of Rebel troops west of the Mississippi River prior to the final capitulation of the Confederates in 1865. While the victory there did not have a major impact on the Union’s drive to take Vicksburg, it did ease the movement of Union shipping on the Mississippi and raise the morale of the Yankee troops after their rough handling at Chickasaw Bluffs.21

     A. C. Swinburn, in his own words, describes what happened to him at this battle:
           "At the battle of Arkansas Post I belonged to Deshler's Brigade, Churchill's Division, and was detailed with Hart's Battery. Nearly all our army was captured in that battle, but as nearly all my company had a chance to escape, we did so."22

     On 5 May 1863, the men who had been captured and held in prison were released in Petersburg, Virginia.23 On the 20th, Marsh wrote his wife reported that nearly one-third of the regiment was dead. Furthermore, he said that one-half of those who died were either shot or hung in retaliation. He was now in command of the 17th regiment. Of the 313 men who were captured at the fall of the fort, 111 died. Company C had fourteen menwho died in captivity. Five men were left at Camp Douglas because they were too ill to travel.24

     On 14 June 1863, Marsh reported from Tulahoma, Tennessee that the 17th Texas Cavalry Regiment died on May 23 when it was consolidated with the 18th, 24th, and 25th Texas Cavalries. He was allowed to keep his old company (Company C). He also reported that the boys left at Camp Douglas were now with them. He said ". . . . most of the boys that escaped at the Post were of little credit to them selves. Some of them run wors (sic) then scared dogs whilst the fight was goin (sic) on."2526

     On 8 April 1864, "I [meaning A. C. Swinburn] was in the battles of Mansfield, Pleasant Hill (9 Apr) and Yellow Bayou. My Captain was killed at Mansfield, and dark came on us in that hole and I got lost from my command, and in hunting my way out I found a Union soldier and he wanted me to carry him out, and I told him that I would not do it, but would leave him my canteen of water and some bread and meat, and left him and found my company at 12 o'clock that night, and was telling some of my company what I had found. I did not believe he woudl ever be found, as the country was rough and full of bushes. Next morning we followed up our victory, fought the battle of Pleasant Hill and gained a second victory. We followed the enemy and were gone some two weeks. When we returned we heard of someone being found that had lain on the battlefield for ten days and his chances for recovery were good, and that was the last we ever heard of him. Several years ago ther was a man advertised in the Dallas News trying to find the man who gave him the bread and water at the battle of Mansfield, but I did not get his address, and would like to know it now, so that I might correspond with him."22

(To read about the battle, click The Battle of Mansfield)

(To read about the battle, click The Battle of Pleasant Hill)

     Alvin Curtis Swinburn and Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert obtained a marriage license on 26 December 1868 in Nacogdoches County, Texas.27 Alva C. Swinburn, 23, married Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert, 20, daughter of Floyd Jackson Gilbert and Nancy Ann Sparkman, on 15 January 1869 at Nacogdoches County, Texas, in a ceremony was performed by J. S. Lambert.28,29,30

     In October 1884, he moved his family to Henrietta, Wilbarger County, Texas. At that time he was a brick contractor.

     "He not only has the distinction of making the first brick in this county, but assisted in the construction of a number of Vernon's first brick buildings. Among the brick structures was the county's first brick jail (1885) and its first brick court house, which was built in 1886. He also built a brick jail at Margaret, Texas, in the early days when that town was recognized as the county seat of Hardeman County."31

     On 30 April 1886, "Henrietta: . . . A. C. Swinburn left on Friday /[30th/] with his family to make his home at Vernon, in the free State of Wilbarger, where, with his partners, he has the contract for the $85,900 courthouse."32

     In 1895, he lived at Tolbert, Wilbarger County, Texas, which is eight miles northwest of Vernon off Highway 287.

     The Tolbert Methodist Church was organized by Rev. S. W. Turner on April 10, 1892. The charter members of the church included: Dora A. Turner, S. W. Turner, W. F. Turner, Neal Waskom Turner, H. A. Turner, Eula Swinburn, Mrs. N. E. (E. N. ?) Swinburn. Obviously, this is where Eula met her future husband (they were married two years later). [Unfortunately, I cannot find my source for this.]

     On 10 October 1901, A. C. Swinburn, of Vernon, was one of the forty-six men whose discharges in bankruptcy were granted.33

     Jessie Swinburn Drennan also remembers that A. C. had a fine reputation in Vernon. He was particularly noted for his dependability.

     Elisabeth Turner Alford says her family went every year for Christmas to the senior Swinburn's home in Vernon.34

     His death certificate stated he had lived at his residence for 35 years, was under the doctor's care from April 1 through the date of his death and that at time of his death was 74 years, 5 months and 26 days old.

     Oscar Swinburn, his son, was the informant who incorrectly said his mother's maiden name was Jones and she was born in Tennessee. He said his father was also born in Tennessee.6

     Alva C. Swinburn died on 11 May 1920 at age 74 in Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas,6 and was buried on 12 May 1920 in Eastview Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas. A.C. SWINBURN LAID TO REST BY FELLOW PIONEERS - DECEASED KNOWN FOR RECORD IN WAR BETWEEN STATES AND REPUTATION AS BUILDER OF LARGE NUMBER OF PUBLIC STRUCTURES THROUGHOUT THIS SECTION OF STATE - MANY AT FUNERAL

     A. C. Swinburn pioneer - of this community, died at the family residence after a long and lingering illness, Thursday, May 12 (or 11 ?), at the age of 74 (?), 5 months and 226 days.

     Mr. Swinburn was born in Salem, Illinois November 15 and . . . moved to Texas with his family as a child.

     He enlisted in the Confederate Army at Nacogdoches under _________Hancock; Polignac Division and served with honor and distinction through the four long years of the Civil War. Mr. Swinburn participated in the Battle of Manassas and other major engagements of the war.

     It is reported of Mr. Swinburn that on the battlefield he once gave an enemy wounded and in a dying condition his canteen of water and his supply of hardtack. Years later, this man advertised in the Dallas News to find Mr. Swinburn.

SURVIVED BY FOUR CHILDREN

     In _____ he was married to Miss Elizabeth Gilbert at Nacogdoches with whom he lived happily until the time of his death. To this union were born six children, two dying in infancy. The four surviving children, Oscar S. of Vernon, Matt S. of Tolbert and Mrs. Eula Turner and Mrs. W. F. Martin of Wichita Falls were present at the funeral. The fourteen grandchildren of the deceased, a brother Sidney Swinburn and his son of Mexia and W. F. Martin, a son-in-law were also present.

     Mr. Swinburn accompanied by his eldest son, Oscar, arrived in Vernon in 1884 where they installed the first brickyard, located just south of the W. M. McCaleb home. The equipment for this yard was hauled overland from Henrietta and the fuel burned in this plant was wood hauled from Beaver creek (sic). From this first brick in 1885 the first jail was erected. In 1886 Mr. Swinburn moved his family to this county from Henrietta and the same year laid the cornerstone for the court house which he completed with his associates Strain & Iristey (?), a year or two later.

BUILT MANY BUILDINGS

     This contractor built the first brick opera house which was situated on the east side of the square and was destroyed sometime later by fire. The Masonic Temple, the HAL(?)M Store Building, the Renfro Bricks, and other buildings here were his handiwork.

     In the last years of his contracting work he was associated with the late John White of this city and they built court houses and jails at Paducah, Wellington, Clarendon, Memphis, Henrietta, Mangun, Oklahoma, and all over the Panhandle country. He also filled large contracts for the railroads at Jacksboro in bridges and erected the courthouse at that place.

     The funeral services Wednesday afternoon were conducted at his home by Rev. E. R. Barcus of the First Methodist Church assisted by Rev. S. T. Bradbury of the Central Christian Church. The active pallbearers were: T. P. Liuman, John Reese, E. P. Robertson, W. R. Martin, J. D. Summerour and Ed Swim. The honorary pallbearers were his old comrades in arms from Camp Cabell U.C.V. The remains were laid to rest in East View Cemetery.

     In respect to his memory, the Commissioner's Court adjourned their sitting until after the funeral."35

     Another obituary ran in The Confederate Veteran Magazine:
               "A.C. Swinburne, pioneer building contractor of Vernon, Tex., died at his home there on May 11, aged seventy-four years. He was born in Salem, Ill., on November 15, 1845, and went with his parents to Texas when a child. He served in the Confederate army under Captain Hancock, Polignac's Division, and served with honor and distinction during the four years of war. He took part in the battle of Manassas and other major engagements of his command. It is told of him that on the battle field he once gave a wounded enemy, supposedly in dying condition, his canteen of water, and years after this man advertised in the Dallas News to find him.

          In 1869 Comrade Swinburne was married to Miss Elizabeth Gilbert, of Nacogdoches, with whom he lived happily until his death. To them were born six children, two sons and two daughters surviving him.

          In 1884 he and his eldest son installed the first brickyard in Vernon, and from the first brick produced the first jail was (sic) erected in 1885; and as a contractor and builder he erected some of the most important buildings of the town in the years following, also filling large contracts with the railroads for bridges, etc.
     
          He was laid to rest in Eastview Cemetery, his old comrades of Camp Cabell, U.C.V., acting as honorary pallbearers."

     With respect to the Union soldier advertising in the Dallas Morning News: Jesse Elizabeth Swinburne Drennan (A.C.'s granddaughter) told me that A. C. went immediately to the newspaper to try to contact the former Union soldier. Amazingly enough, the newspaper had not taken down an address, nor had the man given one in his advertisement. Therefore, A. C. was never able to contact the man who advertised trying to locate him. What a shame!36,6,37

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1850as Alva C. and 4 years of ageLynn Township, Posey County, Indiana2
1860as Alvin C. and 13 years of ageNacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas38
1867as having been in the county for 13 yearsNacogdoches County, Texas39
187024 years of age and living immediately adjacent to his fatherNacogdoches PO, Nacogdoches County, Texas40
Brick Mason40
188034 years of age, but is not found in indices. There are four boarders listed in his household: John Brennan, age 37; James Ahinan, age 47; Denis H34 years of age, but is not found in indices. There are four boarders listed in his household: John Brennan, age 37; James Ahinan, age 47; Denis H[M]etly, age 47 and Pat Obrian, age 45. All of these men were railroad workersetly, age 47 and Pat Obrian, age 45. All of these men were railroad workersSpringfield & Tehuacana Precincts, Limestone County, Texas41
Brick Mason41
190054 years of age. His wife and daughter, Vinnie, were living in his household as were his son Matt S. and Matt's wife. In addition, he lived immediately adjacent to his son, Oscar A. and his family. Alva reported having been married for 30 yearsJustice Precinct 6, Wilbarger County, Texas42
Brick Mason who reported being out of work for 6 months, but who owned his farm free of mortgage42
191065 years of age, although his surname is spelled Swimburne and married for forty-one yearsVernon, Wilbarger County, Texas43
Brick Layer (House) who owns his home free of mortgage43
192074 years of ageVernon, Wilbarger County, Texas44
Bricklayer who works on salary and own his home free of mortgage44

Citations

  1. [S576] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, editor, The People of Nacogdoches County in 1860 - An Edited Census, 1978), page 7.
  2. [S961] "1850 United States Federal Census," Posey County, Indiana, population schedule, Lynn Township, dwelling 790, family 790, Edwin Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S657] Swinburn, E. N., Will of E. N. Swinburn, Book L, Case No. 1214, pages 431-434 N75, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas.
  4. [S792] Anonymous, "Obituary of Alva C. Swinburn," The Confederate Veterans Magazine, January 1920 - December 1920, XXVIII (1987, 1988): page 307.
  5. [S596] Alva C. Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcribed from tombstone, 15 Oct 1999, East View Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas.
  6. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JFZF-NRX : accessed 17 Dec 2012), A. C. Swinburn, 11 May 1920; citing Vernon, Wilbarger, Texas, reference cn 18278, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,073,788.
  7. [S779] "Old Nacogdoches University Rosters - Students and Instructors", contributed by Peggy Price, online at https://sites.rootsweb.com/~txnacogd/schools/oub_rosters1858.htm , uploaded 10 Apr 2001, website address verified 10 Jun 2019, accessed on 10 May 2004. Transcribed at the East Texas Research Center, Stephen F. Austin State University, Nacogdoches, Texas: Lois F. Blount Papers, Box 31, A-107 and the R. B. Blake Papers, Box 1, Folder 5, by Debbie Wayne in May and Jun 2001.
  8. [S1427] Alva C. Swinburn, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organization from Texas - 17th (Consolidated) Dismounted Cavalry (n.p.: n.pub.), Record Group unknown record group , Roll Microcopy 323, Roll #96; digitized and made available by unknown agency, unknown url, a copy of this record is in my possession.
  9. [S2381] Yeary, Mamie, compiler. Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865 (Dallas, Texas: Smith & Lamar, 1912), page, 737.
  10. [S1788] Letters from Laurence Taylor to his father, Charles Taylor, Letters, 12-18 July, 1862, XLII, East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas, pages 87-89.
  11. [S791] Veteran Service Records, Military Service Records of Swinborn, Alva C. (Washington, D. C.: National Archives and Records Service), Record Group unknown record group ; digitized and made available by unknown agency, unknown url.
  12. [S1772] Marsh, Bryan. "The Confederate Letters of Bryan Marsh," Chronicles of Smith County, Texas, vol. 14, no. 2 (Winter, 1975): page 10. Bryan Marsh enlisted in 1861 and was promoted to captain of Company C, 17th Texas Cavalry Regiment. Although he was promoted to colonel after the consolidation, he continued to keep up with the members of his old company. He was sheriff in Smith County for 20 years and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Tyler, Texas.
  13. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 10-11.
  14. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 11-13.
  15. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 13-15.
  16. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 15-17.
  17. [S1427] Alva C. Swinburn, Alva C. Swinburn's Service Recds..
  18. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 17-18.
  19. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 19-20.
  20. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", pages 20-21.
  21. [S1773] Christ, Mark K.. "The Encyclopedia of Arkansas: Battle of Arkansas Post", online at https://encyclopediaofarkansas.net/entries/battle-of-arkansas-post-525/ , website address verified 3 Jul 2019.
  22. [S2381] Yeary. Reminiscences of Boys in Gray, page 737.
  23. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 22.
  24. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 23.
  25. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 24.
  26. [S1772] Marsh. "Marsh Letters", page 25.
  27. [S2455] Mullins, Marion Day, compiler. Early Texas Marriage Records, 1837-1905 (Fort Worth: Fort Worth Genealogical Society, n.d.), Nacogdoches Records, page 39, copied from courthouse records, 1949.
  28. [S578] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, The People of Nacogdoches County in the Civil War, 1980), page 249.
  29. [S1072] Murrie, Pauline Shirley. Marriage Records of Nacogdoches County, Texas, 1824-1881 (Houston, Texas: P. S. Murrie, 1968), page 74, provides name of officiant.
  30. [S2586] "Texas Marriages, 1837-1973," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXQK-Z2G : accessed 6 Apr 2011), Alvin C. Swinburn and W. E. Gilbert, 15 Jan 1869; citing , Nacogdoches, Texas, , reference 2:JRTJRV; FHL microfilm 25,312.
  31. [S465] Ross, Charles P. and Rouse, T. L.. Official Early-Day History of Wilbarger County (Vernon, Texas: The Vernon Daily Record, 1973), page 151.
  32. [S1961] "DELAYED SOCIETY NOTES - Henrietta," Dallas Morning News, Texas, 4 May 1886, page 5, A. C. Swinburn.
  33. [S1958] "FORTY-SIX MADE HAPPY. Discharges in Bankruptcy Granted by Federal Judge Meek," Fort Worth Morning Register, Texas, 10 Oct 1901, page 8, A. C. Swinburn.
  34. [S875] Interview with Elisabeth Turner Alford (Wichita Falls, Texas), by Toby Turner, October 13-14, 1999. Library of Toby Turner (Houston, Harris County, Texas).
  35. [S1807] A.C. Swinburn Laid to Rest, Vernon Daily Record, Right Hand Column, ? May 1920, Front Page, on microfilm.
  36. [S596] Alva C. Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcribed from tombstone, East View Memorial Park,, Block 3, Lot 61, Grave 7.
  37. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 3 Jan 2019, memorial page for Alva Curtis Swinburn (1845-1920) at memorial page... Maintained by Toby, originally created by Tamera; citing Eastview Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  38. [S68] "1860 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, Beat No. 1 A Township, dwelling 60, family 60, E N Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  39. [S280] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves. Nacogdoches--Gateway to Texas : a biographical directory, II (Fort Worth: Arrow/Curtis Print. Co., 1974), page 391.
  40. [S672] "1870 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, 1st District Township, dwelling 116, family 116, Alvin C Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  41. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, Enumeration District (ED) 95, Sheet 14, dwelling 109, family 117, A. C Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  42. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 132, Sheet 4, dwelling 63, family 65, Alva C. Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  43. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 237, Sheet 7A, dwelling 122, family 124, Alva Swimburne household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  44. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Vernon Township, Enumeration District (ED) 196, Sheet 10B, dwelling 173, family 222, Alva C Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  45. [S677] "1880 U. S. Census," Limestone County, Texas, pop. sch., Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, ED 95, Sheet 14, dwell. 109, fam. 117, A. C Swinburn household, Roll 1317, page 376B.
  46. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966, accessed 19 Dec 2012.

Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert1,2

F, #259, b. 15 October 1848, d. 5 December 1927
FatherFloyd Jackson Gilbert3 b. 1817, d. 1861
MotherNancy Ann Sparkman4 b. 1826, d. a 28 Aug 1850
From left to right: Eula Swinburne Turner, Lerline Turner and Nancy Elizabeth Swinburne
On rock: Elisabeth Turner
Picture taken c1917

Family

Alvin Curtis Swinburn b. 15 Nov 1845, d. 11 May 1920
Child
Last Edited10 Oct 2019
     Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert was born on 15 October 1848, daughter of Floyd Jackson Gilbert and Nancy Ann Sparkman, in Florida. As one can see from the sources, there is disagreement as to where she was born, with the majority of the sources reporting Florida as the state of birth.

     I've checked 1840, 1850 and 1860 census enumerations exhaustively looking for her family with no success.5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12 She was also known as Nancy Elizebette3 or as Betty I've learned that it was a family tradition for all Gilbert family members to be known by their middle name.13

     Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert and Alvin Curtis Swinburn obtained a marriage license on 26 December 1868 in Nacogdoches County, Texas.14 Nancy Elizabeth, 23, married Alva C. Swinburn, 20, son of Edwin N. Swinburne and Martha Ann O'Neal, on 15 January 1869 at Nacogdoches County, Texas, in a ceremony was performed by J. S. Lambert.15,16,17

     On 7 November 1908, she was the Grantee and the Patentee in a land transaction in Fannin District, Wilbarger County for 640 acres. This looks as if she was dealing with the same land of which A. C. was a Grantee, but no Patentee is shown.18

     Nancy's granddaughter, Jesse Elizabeth Swinburne Drennan, used to go and spend the night with her grandparents. She particularly remembers sitting on the wrap-around veranda of their home in Vernon. She also remembers her grandmother remonstrating with her husband over his forgetting to bring home candy for Jesse while she was visiting. She remembers Nancy shaking her finger at A. C. and saying "You're always forgetting things I ask you to do."19

     Nancy Elizabeth Swinburn died of apoplexy (Paralysis due to stroke) on 5 December 1927 at age 79 in Wichita Falls, Wichita County, Texas,20 and was buried on 6 December 1927 in Eastvew Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas.21,3,22

     When we visited the newspaper to view microfilm from this date to see her obituary, we discovered that the month of December was missing and had not been filmed.

     A Mortuary Notice datelined 9 Dec stated: "Funeral services for Mrs. A. C. Swinburn, 79, Vernon pioneer, who died in Wichita Falls at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. C. Martin, were held at the Underwood Funeral home here. The Rev. C. A. Bickley, pastor of the First Methodist Church, had charge of the services, assisted by the Rev. J. M. Perry, pastor of the Central Christian Church. Surviving children are O. A. Swinburn of Vernon, M. S. Swinburn of Clarendon, Mrs. W. F. Turner of Wichita Falls and Mrs. W. C. Martin of Wichita Falls."23

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1850as Elisabeth and being 2 years of age24th District, Dooly County, Georgia24
1860unable to find her. She was not listed under her surname or as a Gilbert female between the ages of 0-30. There was an Elizabeth Gilbert who was a 20 year-old factory laborer living with Levi Johnson in Macon, Georgia, but this cannot be she. I've even searched all females by the Gilbert or Guilbert surname, to no avail. She was overlooked. I've looked at Florida and Georgia. Nor did I find her father in either state
1870as Betty, and 20 years oldNacogdoches PO, Nacogdoches County, Texas13
188031 years of ageSpringfield & Tehuacana Precincts, Limestone County, Texas25
190051 years of age and reports having borne five children of whom four are livingJustice Precinct 6, Wilbarger County, Texas26
191062 years of age and having borne six children of whom four were livingVernon, Wilbarger County, Texas27
192072 years of ageVernon, Wilbarger County, Texas28

Citations

  1. [S596] Alva C. Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcribed from tombstone, 15 Oct 1999, East View Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas , visited by Toby Turner, October 13, 1999.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDFS-CP8 : accessed 7 Jul 2010), Vinnie Lea Martin, 26 Aug 1966; citing Arlington, Tarrant, Texas, reference cn 55289, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,118,373 Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 2495 of 3530 to see it.
  3. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Nancy Elizebette Swinburn, 05 Dec 1927; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference CN 42705, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,114,436, accessed 19 Dec 2012.
  4. [S3793] Richards, Janna, "Email from Janna Richards," e-mail message from (e-mail address) to Toby Turner, dated 13 May 2014, entitled "Re: Family finder match," along with an invitation to view her family tree on ancestry.
  5. [S882] Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcriber, 15 Oct 1999, East View Memorial Park, Vernon, Wilbarger County, Texas , gives date of birth as 15 Oct 1848.
  6. [S465] Ross, Charles P. and Rouse, T. L.. Official Early-Day History of Wilbarger County (Vernon, Texas: The Vernon Daily Record, 1973), page 151, states she was born in Florida.
  7. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, Enumeration District (ED) 95, Sheet 14, dwelling 109, family 117, A. C. Swinburn household, digital images. Says she, as well as her parents, were all born in Florida. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  8. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 132, Sheet 4, dwelling 63, family 65, Alva C. Swinburn household, digital images. Says she was born in Georgia in Oct 1848. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  9. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 237, Sheet 7A, dwelling 122, family 124, Alva Swinburne household, digital images. Says she was born in Florida with her father born in Georgia and her mother, in Florida. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  10. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, population schedule, Vernon Township, Enumeration District (ED) 196, Sheet 10B, dwelling 173, family 222, Alva C Swinburn household, digital images. Says she was born in Florida with both parents born in Tennessee. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  11. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Nancy Elizebette Swinburn, 05 Dec 1927; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference CN 42705, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,114,436, accessed 19 Dec 2012. Her death certificate states both parents were born in Florida.
  12. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966, accessed 19 Dec 2012. Says she was born in Florida, with no birth date listed.
  13. [S672] "1870 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, 1st District Township, dwelling 116, family 116, Alvin C Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  14. [S2455] Mullins, Marion Day, compiler. Early Texas Marriage Records, 1837-1905 (Fort Worth: Fort Worth Genealogical Society, n.d.), Nacogdoches Records, page 39, copied from courthouse records, 1949.
  15. [S578] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, The People of Nacogdoches County in the Civil War, 1980), page 249.
  16. [S1072] Murrie, Pauline Shirley. Marriage Records of Nacogdoches County, Texas, 1824-1881 (Houston, Texas: P. S. Murrie, 1968), page 74, provides name of officiant.
  17. [S2586] "Texas Marriages, 1837-1973," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FXQK-Z2G : accessed 6 Apr 2011), Alvin C. Swinburn and W. E. Gilbert, 15 Jan 1869; citing , Nacogdoches, Texas, , reference 2:JRTJRV; FHL microfilm 25,312.
  18. [S874] "Texas, Land Title Abstracts, 1700-2008," database, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., (http://www.ancestry.com: 2000) accessed 31 Jul 2012, entry for N. E. Swinburn, 7 Nov 1908, Certificate: 32/3024, File: 46793, Survey/Blk/Tsp: 2H & TC 16- Patent #597, Patent Volume: 36. Texas General Land Office. Abstracts of all Original Texas Land Titles comprising Grants and Locations. Austin, Texas.
  19. [S229] Interview with Jessie Swinburne Drennan (Vernon, Texas), by Toby Turner, 19 Apr 2001 conducted at the Warwick Hotel, Houston, Texas. Library of Toby Turner (Houston, Harris County, Texas).
  20. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Nancy Elizebette Swinburn, 05 Dec 1927; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference CN 42705, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,114,436, accessed 19 Dec 2012. The informant was her daughter, Eula Turner, and it's noted Nancy lived at 1815 Woodrow St. which was not her daughter's address.
  21. [S882] Nancy Elizabeth Gilbert Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcriber, East View Memorial Park,.
  22. [S596] Alva C. Swinburn tombstone. Toby Turner, transcribed from tombstone, East View Memorial Park,, visited by Toby Turner, October 13, 1999.
  23. [S1962] "Deaths - Swinburn," Dallas Morning News, Texas, 10 Dec 1927, Part 2, page 23, Mrs. A. C. Swinburn.
  24. [S961] "1850 United States Federal Census," Dooly County, Georgia, population schedule, dwelling 185, family 185, Jackson Gilbert household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  25. [S677] "1880 U. S. Census," Limestone County, Texas, pop. sch., Springfield & Tehuacana Precincts Township, ED 95, Sheet 14, dwell. 109, fam. 117, A. C. Swinburn household, Roll 1317, page 376B.
  26. [S70] "1900 U. S. Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, pop. sch., ED 132, Sheet 4, dwell. 63, fam. 65, Alva C. Swinburn household, Roll 1679, page 302A.
  27. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, pop. sch., ED 237, Sheet 7A, dwell. 122, fam. 124, Alva Swinburne household, Roll 1597, page 127A if using name search and 127B if using roll and page number search.
  28. [S72] "1920 U. S. Census," Wilbarger County, Texas, pop. sch., Vernon Township, ED 196, Sheet 10B, dwell. 173, fam. 222, Alva C Swinburn household, Roll 1855, page 154B if using name search and 154C if using roll and page number search.
  29. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Eula Turner, 06 Sep 1948; citing Wichita Falls, Wichita, Texas, reference cn 41282, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,218,966, accessed 19 Dec 2012.

Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner1

M, #260, b. 21 March 1842, d. 16 May 1916
Relationship2nd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherCharles Granderson Turner2 b. 17 Feb 1817, d. 30 Jan 1880
MotherSarah Williamson Rainey3 b. 29 Oct 1815, d. 7 Oct 1888
ChartsDescendant Chart (Box)

Family 1

Loudie Williams b. 2 Apr 1843, d. 20 Oct 1869
Child

Family 2

Dora Anna Shuford b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916
Children
Last Edited19 May 2020
     Stephen Williamson Turner was born on 21 March 1842 in Warrenton, Warren County, North Carolina.4,5

     From the time he was five, Stephen lived in Marengo, Mecklenburg County, Virginia, until he joined the Confederate Army. This area cannot be located on Google Maps, apparently it was close to La Crosse in Mecklenburg County.6

     He was Methodist. "The Sardis Methodist Church in Marengo, now La Crosse, Mecklenburg County, was important to the Rainey and later the Turner family. It was located a short distance away from the Williamson Rainey home on the Bracy Road. This is the church where Stephen Williamson Turner 'got religion.' The Methodist Church played a very important part in his life and in the life of his son, Neal. Stephen would have known the second version of the church, but not the present one (built in 1911). . ..

     According to Grady Turner /[his grandson/], Stephen and some of his cousins joined the Confederate army at Tanner's Store near LaCrosse."7

     A biography of him prepared by for a 1916 Methodist conference states he was fifteen at the time he joined the Sardis Church under the ministry of Rev. J. W. Blincoe.8

     In 1858, in the fall, Stephen signed the following pledge, "I hereby solemnly promise on my oath and honor to observe and obey all the By-Laws and Regulations of Emory & Henry College." His age is listed as 16 and his father also signed at Tanner's Store.9 /[Although I don't have the specific page number from the Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Emory and Henry College for 1859, he should be listed as a Freshman. This college was founded in 1836 and is the oldest institute of higher learning in southwest Virginia./].

     Between 1859 and 1860, Stephen was a member of the Freshman class 10 while his brother, Benjamin, was a Sophomore at Emory, Washington County, Virginia.11

     Between 1860 and 1861, he continued as a student in Emory and Henry College as a Sophomore.12

     Before 1861, "Dad's youth was spent mostly as a farm boy in Warren County, North Carolina, and Mecklenburg County, Virginia. He attended Old Doyle School until fifteen, when he entered Emory & Henry College and attended two terms. The following year he taught at the Old Doyle School. "13

     In an undated letter from Grady Turner to Ann Cook, undated, he writes that this school was located near Bracey, Virginia. He also states that Stephen attended two years and part of a third at Emory & Henry College, but left to join the Confederate Army.

     Grady writes, ""When Dad (Stephen W.) was quite small, his parents moved over the State line into Mecklenburg County, Virginia, near Boydton. I found that house and also the little church where Dad 'got religion' and also Tanner's Store where, upstairs, Dad joined the Masonic Lodge and downstairs where he enlisted in the Mecklenberg /[sic/Spartans, later Co. B., 56th Virginia Infantry . . . ."13

     Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner began military service on 22 June 1861 at Tanner's Store, Mecklenburg County, Virginia, Virginia 56th Infantry, Company B, as a 2nd Lientenant for a period of 12 months.14

     According to Grady Turner, Stephen's grandson, Stephen and some of his cousins joined the Confederate army near LaCrosse, Virginia. 15 In the cited source, Grady told the author that his father "signed the muster roll beneath a giant, shady, oak tree in the front yard of Tanner's Store in Mecklenburg County, Virginia."16

     On 23 Sep 1932, Grady T. Turner wrote the War Department the following: "Tanner's Store was a post office in 1861 but the name of the community is now La Crosse, Va, which is also a post office. Tanner's Store is still standing altho it is now used as a residence."17

     From his report on SW Turner C.S.A., Grady Turner writes: "Stephen Williamson Turner, enlisted June 22, 1861, in the Mecklenburg Spartans /[56th Virginia Infantry, Company B/], at Tanner's Store, Mecklenburg County, Virginia. The Company was in (sic) command of Captain George W. Davis and Lieut. Turner was elected Second Lieutenant.

     The Company was ordered to Richmond, where it went into training at the Fair Grounds, and became Company B, 56th Virginia, commanded by Colonel William D. Stuart. Before leaving for Richmond, the Spartans were given a farewell picnic and presented a flag. In my research, I was fortunate in meeting the lady, who as a young girl had made the presentation and had gone to school with my Father. She remarked, 'The boys looked so handsome in their new Butternut uniforms.
'"13

     His name appears on a Register containing Rosters of Commissioned Officers, Provisional Army Confederate States, showing his appointment 15 Jul 1861 and that he was dropped from the roll 5 May 1862 (after his capture).18

     A payment voucher and statement shows he was paid from 15 Jul to 31 Aug, 1861 a total of $125.19

     On the Muster Roll of Company B, 56 Reg't Virginia Infantry, Stephen is shown as present for September and October, 1861, as well as having last been paid as of 1 Sep.1420

     In a cover letter accompanying his sketch on how the Turners came to Texas, Grady Turner writes, "In Washington, I obtained a photostatic copy of two of Dad's Pay Vouchers as a 2nd Lieut. in the 56th Virginia Infantry and other papers. I also have a tintype of dad in his Confederate uniform."13

     "TURNER, STEPHEN W; enl. 6/22/1861 Co. B. of the 56th Virginia Infantry in Mecklenburg, 2nd Lt; present 9-10-1861; appointed 2nd Lt. 7/15/1861; In command of Col in Russellville, Ky. 2/4/1862; POW Ft. Donelson - confined Camp Chase and Johnson's Island 4/10/1862 - sent to Vicksburg for exchange 9/1/1862 - exchanged 11/8/1862; dropped as 2nd Lt. 5/5/1862. went to Texas after his exchange with members of the 7th Texas who had been POWs with him - joined Chambers Battalion and 13th Texas Inf; born: Warren County, N.C. to Charles Granderson and Sara Rainey Turner; lived in Marengo, Mecklenburg Co. from age 5 until war started; entered Emory and Henry College at age 15 - taught school in Mecklenburg; settled in Smith Co., Texas after war; married Dora Ann Shuford Long 2/10/1874 in Tyler, Texas - 7 boys and 2 girls; founded Commercial Department at Polytechnic College, Fort Worth, Texas 1895 and taught there; also taught Latin and Greek at Weatherford College, Weatherford, Texas; tax assessor for Smith Co., 2 terms; minister in Methodist Church 50 years; got pension from Texas; died 5/22/1916 Cisco, Texas. Burial: Gatesville, Texas."21

     This book also has a photograph of Stephen as a young 2nd Lt. It doesn't note when it was submitted, but the book also mentions getting information from a manuscript of a book which Grady Turner wrote in 1931. Attempts are being made by Vernon Drewa to locate the book and photograph for inclusion in our respective genealogies.

     On 31 October 1861, a Payment Voucher and Statement show he was paid $80 (worth $2014.79 in 2012 dollars assuming he was not paid in Confederate dollars this early) for the month of October.22

     On 23 November 1861, "Rec'd of Capt. R. B. Powers sixteen hundred 20/100 dollars for Capt. Davis.
               S. W. Turner
               Lieut Co. B 56th Va Regt.23

     On 30 November 1861, a payment account shows he was paid $80 from the end of October to the end of November for one month's service. A voucher shows he received payment.24

     On 16 February 1862, he was captured at Fort Donelson as shown by his name appearing on a Roll of Prisoners of War at Camp Chase, Ohio. He appears on a Memorandum of commissioned officers of 56th Virginia Regiment, prisoners of war, for transportation from Indianapolis, Indiana to Columbus, Ohio, to be delivered to the commanding officer at that place, March 4, 1862. His service record shows he was transferred to Johnsons Island 10 Apr 1862.25 26

     His grandson, Grady, explains this prison was located in Sandusky Bar, Lake Erie, Ohio.

     I have a certificate that states Stephen Williamson Turner, 2nd Lieutenant of the 56th Virginia, Co. B is recorded as a Prisoner of War at the Johnson's Island Prisoner of War Depot located in Sandusky Bay, Lake Erie, Ohio. It shows he was captured on February 16, 1862, arrived at Johnson's Island on April 9, 1862 and was transferred on September 1, 1862 to Vicksburg.27

     From his son, comes the following, "At the Battle of Fort Donaldson (sic), the Company Commander became Regimental Commander and Dad was left in charge of Company B. I well recall his telling me how they surprised the "Yankees" while they were eating breakfast and gave them a good whipping. Dad always insisted, 'The South was never whipped, they wore themselves out whipping the Yankees.'

     "Fort Donaldson (sic) surrendered, but before General Grant could completely take over, many of the Confederates managed to escape on foot, on horseback and by water. Dad was in charge of loading troops aboard ship to escape, when orders came to 'hurry.' The boat took off without even pulling the gang plank. Many of the soldiers fell into the water and Dad was left on the dock to become a prisoner."

     "Along with other line officers, Dad was sent to an officers prison camp on Johnson's Island in Lake Erie, near Sanduskey (sic), Ohio. Faced with the possibility of going "stir crazy", Dad volunteered to cook. His first attempt, lacking any knowledge of the culinary art, turned out a flop. He cooked rice and it wasn't long before every utinsel (sic) in the kitchen was full of rice and the men ate rice until they were blue in the face. Dad took much ribbing over this. His seven months in prison make quite a story but to tell that would take too long and take us away from 'how he came to Texas.'"28

     In another account, Grady reports, "Early in 1862, the 56th became part of General John B. Floyd's command and was ordered to Ft. Donelson. In the reorganization of the army, for the defense of Ft. Donelson, Captain Davis was advanced to command of the 56th because Col. Stuart was sick in Richmond and Lieut. Turner became commander of Company B, and commanded it in the Battle.

     When the Garrison surrendered, Lieut. Turner was in charge of the attempt of the 56th to escape by boat, when orders came to 'Hurry.' The boat pulled out without even pulling in the gangplank and the soldiers boarding were dumped into the river. Lieut. Turner was captured and taken first to Camp Chase, Ohio, where the Field Officers were separated form the Line Officers; the Field Officers being sent to Ft. Warren, Massachusetts and the Line Officers sent to another officer's prison camp on Johnson's Island, opposite Sanduskey, Ohio. [In an undated letter, Grady Turner says he researched records in the Adjutant's General's office in Washington where he learned his father was kept prisoner for nearly nine months on Johnson's Island. He states he found a book written by Colonel Barbiere, who was a prisoner at the same time and who lists Stephen as a fellow prisoner, also recounting many experiences Grady remembers his father telling. Grady later made contact with this man's son and obtained a copy of the book after some difficulty.]" 17

     Johnson's Island was selected by the Union Army as a prison site because he was located in Sandusky Bay of Lake Erie, near Sandusky, Ohio. The island was small - about one-half mile across by one mile in length - and would present problems for any prisoner attempting to escape. Federal officials intended to house nearly 3,000 prisoners, but it is likely that at least 10,000 men spent time there. Of those men, approximately 300 died at camp, most from disease. Additional men perished trying to escape the camp or from the harsh winters on Lake Erie. while life was hard there, it is important to note that conditions here were better than those at other Northern or Southern military prisons, primarily because only officers were houses there. Many came from wealthy backgrounds and received financial assistance from their families. Also, Northern officials believed officers were deserving of kinder treatment than enlisted men because of their standing in society. Federal officials removed Johnson Island's original warden, former Sandusky mayor William Piersonk, for abusing prisoners in January 1864.

     In the cover letter accompanying the sketch on "How the Turners Came to Texas," Grady Turner writes, "Dad was in Floyd's Brigade at the Battle of Fort Donelson, Tennessee and was captured and taken to an officers prison on Johnson's Island, Lake Erie, opposite Sandusky, Ohio. While there he met some officers from the 7th Texas and he must have taken quite a shine to them for when he was exchanged he came to Texas with them instead of going back to Virginia to rejoin his Regiment. For the remainder of the War he was with Texas units at Velasco, Texas."13 [Returning to Virginia after his release in Vicksburg would have been difficult for several reasons. Transport was difficult to arrange, Stephen probably had little money and, without friends or family in the states along the way, he probably would have found the journey back to his regiment extremely difficult.]

     In his memoir about his imprisonment at Camp Chase and Johnson's Island, Joseph Barbiere recounts tales that Grady reported having remembered his father recount. I believe the recounting of the death of Lt. Gibson to be one of them. For the most part Barbiere speaks of other men from his state of Tennessee. The italics in the accounts below are those of Joseph Barbiere.

     " A prison mess is not like that of an army or ship's mess, of some few members, but contains from sixty to one hundred. They sleep in two large rooms, in bunks, called with us single, but in our prison two were forced into each; they are three tiers high, the uppermost barely permitting the occupant to turn over without brushing the ceiling. One dining-room, one side of which is arranged with bunks, which renders eating at times, disagreeable to a man of sensitive olfactories." He goes on to describe his mess: "In our room there are ten bare plank tables, each adorned with ten tin plates, an equal number of tin-cups, two-pronged forks, a dull knife, and an iron spoon, a chunk of bread about the size of your fist, to each plate, which allowance is all you get at that meal. In the centre of the table is the meal allowance for ten men, seven and a half pounds of fat, if bacon, and twelve and a half pounds of mostly bone, if beef. Coffee is poured into your cups previous to meals, to cool, which it generally does quite effectively. You stand up to eat, and don't waste time at the table. breakfast at six, dinner at half-past eleven, and supper at half-past five, P. M. We retire to our quarters at 'retreat,' and blow out our lights at 'taps,' the former beat (sic) at sundown, the latter at ten, P. M., and then all is quiet, until the treadmill of daily movements begins with the next day's sun."29

     "Lieutenant Gibson, of the eleventh Arkansas Regiment, Volunteers, was murdered to-day by a sentinel, whom, I learn, did the shooting wilfully and maliciously. An order, that would have put a Caligula or Nero to the blush, had been published by the hypocritical and contemptible Pierson, to the effect, that all prisoners should retire to their quarters at retreat, which was at sundown, the only period of the day, that it was possible to be comfortable, crowding us into a suffocating room, to the number of fifty in ours, three bunks high, and reaching to the ceiling, two in a bunk. One tin pan for us to wash out of; and the straw of our beds changed, not at all in our room. I don't know of the other messes. Yet they say we are well treated. Lieutenant Gibson, as all of us, obeyed the orders of the petty despot; yet this poor fellow fell a victim, as some one must be shot, at intervals, to advertise the crew, (a majority of them) of that Hessian battalion (Hoffman's) so they could play the feather-bed warriors, while the gallant soldiers of the United States were at the front. It may have been different at other pens, but I never knew an old soldier to maltreat a prisoner. Courage and humanity, are synonymous, and the coward is always cruel. Lieutenant Gibson had been spending the afternoon with a comrade, some twenty steps from his quarters, and on hearing the signal for retreat, hastily returned to his room, and had one foot on the threshold, when the assassin hailed him with the expletive, 'You d__d rebel, go back to your quarters.' 'I'm going to them now; these are my quarters,' stopping for a moment to answer the sentinel, who had his gun leveled at him. 'Go back to your quarters, I tell you, you d---d rebel.' Lieutenant Gibson, whose body was inclined towards the sentinel, turned to step in, and without warning, was shot down; the entire charge, a double one, entering his body. This act of cruelty and crime, places the miscreant, who has proved himself a willing tool, in the line of promotion."

     "Since writing the above, we learn that the author of this damnable outrage, has been promoted to a sergeantey."30

     "Thirty feet from the wall around the entire prison, is an imaginary line, called the dead-line, yet on one side the sinks /[toilet facilities/] are not ten feet from the wall, and it was while going to his quarters from one of them, that Captain Meadows was shot down, an account of which is given in another 'scrap.'"31

     "We have thirty-two officers in prison from Texas. . . . . are a distinguished body of officers, who will make their mark, whenever time and place offers an opportunity."32 These must have been the men who impressed Stephen enough that he joined them in Texas. They appear to all be from various companies of the Texas 7th Infantry Regiment.

     On 1 September 1862, his name appears on a Roll of Prisoners of War at Johnson's Island, Ottawa County, Ohio, dated Headquarters Hoffman Battalion, Depot Prisoners of War, near Sandusky, Ohio.33,34

     From his son comes the following account, "While in prison, Dad met quite a number of officers from Texas, mostly from the 7th /[Regiment/] Texas. He must have become very much attached to them because when exchanged at Vicksburg, instead of returning to Virginia, to rejoin his regiment, Dad came to Texas with his new found friends. This decision, in all probability, had a profound influence on the 'future' Turner Family, for had he rejoined the 56th, it should be recalled that this regiment was part of General Pickett's Brigade, that was practically decimated at Gettysburg."13

     According to biographical information provided by his son, Grady Turner, Stephen joined the 13th Infantry, Company B, after a prisoner exchange in Vicksburg on September 20, 186217 which is confirmed by his pension application, in which he refers to Company B, Bate's Reg. Infantry.

     From May to September, 1863, Col. Bates and the Thirteenth Infantry served in Louisiana under Maj. General Richard Taylor.35

     Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner and Loudie Williams obtained a marriage license on 29 March 1864 at Tyler, Smith County, Texas.36 Stephen, 22, married Loudie Williams, 20 on 29 March 1864 at Tyler, Smith County, Texas. She is said to have been the sister of a Texas Lieutenant.37

     In November 1864, he's on a Regimental Return as Pvt., Co. H, 13th Regiment Texas Infantry with an almost unreadable notation under Enlisted men on Extra or Daily Duty: "as Sergt. Maj. since Nov. 1, 64"

     On the Regimental Return for Dec, it's noted that the he had been absent with leave in Smith County, /[possibly 60/] days since /[of ?/] Dec 64.38

     In March 1865, he's listed on the Regimental Return in Co H, 13th Regiment Texas Infantry as acting Sergt. Major.39

     In April 1865, he's listed as S. W. Turner, Pvt. in Co H, 13th Regiment Texas Infantry on a Regimental Return and is acting adjutant.40

     Stephen ended military service on 26 May 1865 Velasco, Brazoria County, Texas; when his unit was surrendered by General E. K. Smith, commanding Trans-Mississippi Department, on May 26, 1865.

     Grady Turner adds, "The news of the surrender of Lee and Johnson did not reach the Texans at Ft. Velasco until after the Battle of Palmetto Ranch, fought near Brownsville on May 12, 1865. The troops learned of the surrender from captured Union prisoners."17

     Velasco had been a premier port before the development of the intracoastal canal in 1856 which diverted shipping to Galveston. During the Civil War, the port of Velasco was fortified by Confederate troops and eight gun batteries so Union ships were forced to go to New Orleans for drinking water, food and fuel. The Velasco piort played an active role in the exchange of cotton for European guns, ammunition, milled goods and medicines for army and home use. Federal vessels attempted to stop this vital trade and fired upon shore defenses, patrols, and small craft seeking to outrun them.41

     After 26 May 1865, "after the War, he settled in Tyler and taught school. Since his parents were now land poor, Dad went back to Virginia and brought them to Texas. Some of the slaves came along with them and /[their/] shanties, to keep out the cold, were papered with Confederate money. Wish some of it had been kept. The South just might 'Rise Again.'

     During most of the time, Dad taught school in Tyler."

     In 1989, Grady Turner writes, "The War had ruined Stephen Turner's parents, so he went back to Virginia and brought them to Texas, where they settled nearly Tyler, Texas. Some of the former slaves came with them and the cracks in the 'shanties' were papered over with Confederate money."

     In a cover letter to the one with the sketch on how the Turners came to Texas Grady writes, "When the War was over, he went back to Virginia and brought his Mother and Father to Texas. Before the War his parents were very wealthy people but the War left them with lots of 'acreage' and nothing but Confederate money to pay the taxes [in an undated letter, Grady includes the fact that his grandparents were ruined by the War and left with nothing on which to live]. My older Brothers and Sisters tell me that a number of the slaves came to Texas with them and much of the money was used to cover the cracks in the negro shanties.

     Dad's Brother, Ben also came to Texas and spent the rest of his life here. My Grandparents and Uncle Ben are buried at Tyler, Texas."13,17

     "He was twice elected Tax Assessor of Smith County and also debated the Prohibition question with Cone Johnson and other important politicians.13 In 1873 he was elected to the position of County Superintendent of public instruction, but resigned this position in the fall to enter the ministry of the Methodist Church.42 He was ordained to preach and was assigned to Palestine, later Henderson and then Tyler. "

     In his cover letter accompanying his sketch on how the Turners came to Texas, Grady writes "After the War he became Tax Assessor for Smith County and served two terms. Later he entered the ministry. He was also a professor at Polytechnic College, Fort Worth and from there he went to Weatherford College to teach Greek and Latin."13

     Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner and Dora Anna Long obtained a marriage license on 10 February 1874 at Tyler, Smith County, Texas43Stephen, 31, married Dora Anna Long, 23, daughter of Dr. Quincy Adams Shuford and Julia Ann Petty, on 10 February 1874 at Tyler, Smith County, Texas.1,44

     Between 1877 and 1883, Rev. S. W. Turner was Curator on the Southwestern University Board. He is listed for an 8-year term. Six of those years (1877-1882) he is listed from Henderson, Texas. In 1883, he's listed from Tyler, Texas. The term appears to mean overseer, manager or guardian.45

     In 1882, he represented the East Texas Conference /[of Methodists/] in the General Conference.46

     On 25 June 1887, S. W. Turner delivered the address to the Tyler District Conference of the Methodist Church.47

     The family gathered for this photograph, probably around 1887.

     In 1889, "Dad took a leave of absence from the church, because of ill health, and settled on a section of land in Wilbarger County. While here he organized and built the first Methodist Church at Tolbert, Wilbarger County, Texas,and became the first pastor. Lumber for the Church was brought, by rail, from Dad's Lumber Mill near Gilmer, to Vernon and hauled overland from there to Tolbert. It was near here that Cynthia Parker was captured from the Indians by Texas Rangers, after her husband, Chief Nocona, was killed."13

     On 9 July 1891, a report was published on this date in the Texas Christian Advocate with respect to the Tyler District Conference of the Methodist Church being held at the time: ". . . . Rev. S. W. Turner, Financial Agent of Southwestern University, was with us and proved himself a master workman, on the platform and in the pulpit as one of our greatest educators."48

     "The Cyclone of October 29, 1893, which killed twenty-eight persons and destroyed property worth $100.00, was still fresh in the minds of the people and, while I was only about four, I recall how the wind blew a wheat straw into a 2 x 4 in the Church.

     Most everyone had a storm cellar and every time a storm cloud came up, we were hustled into ours. Mother kept it stocked with food and bed linens, at all times. We would spend the night there and I have a vivid recollection of Dad from time to time, going up the stairway, raising the heavy door and peeking out, to try and determine the status of the 'would-be storm.'

     Fortunately, there was no repeat."49

     In 1894, "Dad sold the Wilbarger County farm and moved to Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas, where the children could have educational advantages. Dad was a professor at Polytechnic College and, I believe, organized the Business School."13

     Later he taught Greek and Latin" at Weatherford.13

     In 1897, "Dad again felt the call to preach; and was readmitted to the Church and assigned"13 to Cisco. /[In an undated enclosure, Grady says his father was assigned by the Northwest Conference of the Methodist Church-South to Cisco in November 1898./].49

"From Cisco, we went to Quanah in 1900 and it was here I first saw the Great Quanah Parker, who came to Quanah for most festive occasions.13

     From Quanah, Dad was transferred to Hewitt, again to build a church. While the church and parsonage were being built, we lived in Waco."13

     "From Hewitt, we went to Gatesville, Dad was the Presiding Elder of the District and we were here from 1902 to 1906. In those days, the railroad ended at Gatesville and beyond there was very wild country, populated mostly with desperate characters hiding from the law. When Dad was preparing to make his first trip out in the District, he was warned about the dangers. It did not bother Dad and it wasn't long before many of these desperate men were his friends and some even came to hear him preach. Those fried chicken dinners on the Church ground were great."13 "Our next stop was Midlothian. Here after four years, Dad retired in 1910 and we moved to Dallas, where Dad was authorized by the Methodist Church to organize the Texas Tract Society, a sort of 'propaganda' concern."13

     "From here Dad's activity slowed considerably. Mother passed away in Gatesville on March 22, 1916 and, two months later, to the day, May 22, 1916 Dad went on to his reward.

     If this little sketchy story has been of any help to the remaining Turners in bringing out the many activities of Stephen Williamson Turner and how the Civil War and friendly Texas Confederate prisoners influenced his coming to Texas, I will feel my efforts have been worthwhile."50

     Edith Turner Wren (his granddaughter) remembers this story on her grandfather:

          "My grandfather also enjoyed a good joke. One time, after several black men had raided his watermelon patch and stolen his melons, he decided to teach them a lesson. He had cut down several trees, leaving some stumps about 1 1/2 or 2 feet tall. One night he hid behind a tree that was left, with a broom and white sheet. That night when the Negroes came again to help themselves to some melons, my grandfather, who was over 6 feet tall, held the broom, covered with the sheet above his head, and walked out from behind the tree. It was a moonlit night, and when the intruders saw him - - they scattered in all directions - - hitting most of the stumps as they ran - - making all kinds of moans and groans. From that night, no more watermelons disappeared."51

     On 30 August 1913, a Soldier's Application for a Pension, No. 22649 was filed by S. W. Turner and approved September 1, 1913, with the pension allowed from December 1, 1913. In his application, Stephen states he was discharged June 1865 at Velasco, Texas after surrender of TransMississippi Dept.

     He further states at filing that he is 71 1/2, born in Warren County, N.C., resided in Texas for 49 years, and was currently residing in Dallas County. He stated he'd lived there since Oct. 6, 1910. He describes his occupation as a minister. He stated he's enlisted May 1861 in Co. B. 56th Virginia Infantry and last one Co. B, Bale's Regiment Infantry. In describing his transfer, his writing is very hard to read, but I believe it says "56th Va. Inf. was a 12 mos Reg. I with others of my Co. was captured at Ft. Donelson Tenn. 16th February 1862 and in prison when Regt. reorganized. I had been (?) 2nd Lieut. was of (?) left out in reorganization." He then states he was "Sr. ? 2nd Lieut. I came to Texas after release from Prison and enlisted in Co. B Balte's Regt as above stated."
Witnesses were H. H. Rowland and Geo. G. Burniss (unsure of name due to writing) who swore on September 10, 1913, they knew S. W. Turner had been a bona fide resident of Texas prior to January 1, 1900.

     Alfred Loftice (unsure of spelling due to handwriting) swore in an affidavit that "he personally knows that applicant served in the Confederate army as claimed by him. That he saw (?) the army during the war and knows that he served." "S. C. Niblack states on oath that he was in the same regiment with the applicant and (?) of his own firsthand knowledge that applicant served in the Confederate Army for more than 12 months, made a good soldier and never deserted." Both these affidavits were sworn on September 10, 1912.

     Finally, H. M. Elliston, State and County Assessor of Dallas County certified that S. W. Turner is charged on the land and personal property rolls of said county with estate, real personal and mixed, at the assessed value of None dollars on September 26, 1913.

     In a brief note from the War Department, The Adjutant General's Office, Washington, September 9, 1913, "The records of this office show that Stephen W. Turner, 2d lieutenant, Company B, 56th Virginia Infantry, Confederate States Army, enlisted June 22, 1861, at Tanner's Store; that, as S. W. Turner, he was captured at Ft. Donelson, February 16, 1862; that he was confined at Johnston's Island, Ohio, and that he was exchanged at Vicksburg, Mississippi, September 20, 1862. No later record of him has been found.
               Signed H. O. P. Heinland.52

     In 1914, there was a family reunion during which the family gathered for this photograph. An unknown newspapers on an unknown date published an account of the reunion (found by Vernon Drewa while aiding in the restoration of artifacts from the basement of the Smith County, Courthouse). The reverse side has a date of Jun 1, but no year. The reunion was held in Corsicana where Rev. Neal W. Turner was posted in 1911. Thirty-five people attended.53

     Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner died on 16 May 1916 at age 74 in Cisco, Eastland County, Texas. I've been unable to locate his death certificate on either FamilySearch, Footnote or Ancestry.com. No manner of searching on name variations, by county (Coryell, Ellis, and Eastland), or even by year, has proved successful. His wife had a death certificate in March of 1916 (was listed as S. W. Turner and initially as male, but the certificate was corrected) and another Turner died in 1917 so one can't assume the courthouse burned. However, his tombstone says he died 22 May 1916.54

     He was buried in Masonic Cemetery, Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas.      
The inscription reads (his side):
          "TURNER
     FATHER
          REV. STEPHEN
          W. TURNER
          MAR. 21, 1842
          MAY 22, 1916"

     This cemetery is not listed by Google Maps, but can be found on the map at the corner of E. Main St. and N. 22nd St.5

     He is also reported to have died on 22 May 1916.5,6,55

     His estate was probated on 20 June 1916 in Ellis County, Texas; with H. A. Turner appointed as the temporary administrator. Bond was fixed at $3,000 and approved with C. P. Ledbetter, Sam Sparks and Geo. W. Walling, Jr. as sureties. The final report of the administrator was approved and ordered recorded on 22 Mar 1917.55,56,57

     "It can be said the life of Stephen Williamson Turner was a full one; it was an active one, it was varied and it was a useful and interesting life. This sketchy story, however, is concerned principally with how 'We' became a 'Texas Family.'"58

     In the cover letter to this sketch, Grady provided the following additional details: "There were nine of us "kids" and with the exception of me, all were born in Tyler or Henderson, Texas. I was born in Fort Worth while Dad was teaching in Polytechnic College. Only three of us remain (as of 1969), my Sister Mrs. L. E. Richardson, who lives in Abilene, Texas and my Brother Percy who lives here in Dallas. They are both older than me and I am heading rather rapidly toward 75."13

     As a Methodist minister and teacher, he helped select Dallas as the home of Southern Methodist University. /[I cannot find the source for this, but I believe this also came from Grady, the only member of his family with an interest in genealogy./]

     "REV. S. W. TURNER
     Rev. Steven W. Turner was born in Warren County, North Carolina, March 21, 1842. When but a child he moved with his parents to Mecklenburg County Virginia, where he spent his boyhood days and had the advantages of the old-fashioned country school house in which he received the early part of his education. When he was fifteen years of age he entered Emery and Henry College, and remained there until the outbreak of the Civil War, when his patriotism responded to the call of his country, and he joined Company B, Fifty-Sixth Virginia Infantry in the spring of 1861.

     He was elected Lieutenant of his company. For three and one-half years he served in the Confederate Army. Seven months of this time he was a Federal prisoner.

     At the close of the struggle he found himself in Velasco, Texas. The war had completely wrecked his father's fortune and he had to rely on himself, so he began life anew as a teacher.

     He obtained a position in Tyler, Texas, and taught there for four years. He was converted at Sardis Church, Mecklenburg County, Virginia, under the ministry of Rev. J. W. Blincoe, and joined the M.E. Church, South, at the same time and place, when fifteen years of age.

     Through all his life, and even through the trying experiences of war he was faithful to his profession of religion. He was licensed to preach at the Fourth Quarterly Conference of Tyler Station in November, 1873, and was recommended by the same Quarterly Conference to the Annual Conference for admission on trial.

     He was admitted on trial into the East Texas Conference, which met in Palestine in the same month, and was appointed to Palestine Station. This was a remarkable record. When his name was called as an applicant for admission on trial he was very highly recommended by his Pastor and Presiding Elder Samual Morriss, and the saintly Bishop H. H. Kavanaugh said: "He is the finest preacher I have ever seen or heard never to have preached a sermon." But to the surprise of many and more to himself, he was read out to Palestine Station. He entered upon his new life as pastor with the same cool judgment and firm purpose that ever characterized him and succeeded abundantly from the beginning of his itinerant life. At the close of this year he was ordained deacon by Bishop Mctyeire, at Marshall, Texas. In December, 1874, he was appointed to Starrville Circuit, serving this charge on year, and in 1875 he was appointed to Tyler Station. In 1877 he was appointed to Henderson Station and served this charge until 1880, when he was appointed Presiding Elder of Marshall District. Serving this district two years, his health failed, and in December, 1882, he took a supernumerary relation, holding this relation two years, and continued ill health gave him no promise of a return to his loved work, so in 1884 he located.

     For some years after his location he was County Treasurer of Smith County. On account of continued ill health he moved to Wilbarger County in 1889, and soon regained his health. In 1891 he acted as Financial Agent of the Southwestern University, and in 1892 he supplied Chillicothe Circuit for two years, and built two churches. One was the first church built in Wilbarger County, outside Vernon, the County seat, and the other was the first church built in Hardeman County.

     In 1895 he founded the Commercial Department of Polytechnic College, and was in charge of that department for two years. In 1897 he supplied Weatherford Mission and in November of that year he was readmitted into the Northwest (now Central) Texas Conference, and was assigned to Cisco Station and served this charge in 1898 and 1899. In November 1899, he was appointed to Quanah Station for one year, and in November, 1900, he was appointed to Hewitt charge, serving there two years, organizing the work, building a parsonage and two churches. From November, 1902, to November, 1906, he served the Gatesville District as Presiding Elder. His next appointment was Midlothian Station. He was appointed to this charge in 1906 and served it four years. In 1910, he was appointed editor of Texas Tract Society. In 1911 he was appointed to Eastland Station, one years. This was his last pastorate, and his last active work as a traveling preacher, for in November of this year, 1912, he was superannuated at his own request, and patiently waited in declining health and ministered to an invalid wife for nearly four years, when on March 22, of this year, 1916, his companion left him to go to her father's house on high. Just two months from the day Sister turner died, Brother turner heard the call, answered the summons and went home.

     This is a brief epitome of the biography of one of the best men I have ever known. A tender relation existed between us which began at the time of his pastorate in Midlothian. I was in my first year as Presiding Elder and felt keenly my need of counsel and advise. I found this in his home. His home life was beautiful and tender, truly, he commanded his household well.

     Brother Turner was married to Mrs. Dora A. (Shuford) Long, in 1874. There were born to them eight children, six boys and two girls. One son, Rev. Neal W. Turner, was drowned in August, 1914, in attempting to rescue his young son and a boy companion from a watery grave. All the rest of his children survive him.

     Brother Turner's ability as a preacher was recognized by all who knew him. He was a man of profound thought and ripe scholarship. Had his health permitted him to have continued an unbroken itinerancy his prominence in the Church would have been very much greater.

     But even with shattered health he stood among the first and was recognized leader both in the East Texas Conference in his earnest ministry, and in this Conference where he finished his life's work. He represented the East Texas Conference in the General Conference of 1882. Any interest of the Church was safe in his hands. He loved his Church above all other interests and in all the course of his life he never suffered her banner to trail in the dust. He rejoiced in the history, in the polity, and in the doctrine of Methodism, and no abler defender have these mighty forces of our Church ever had than S. W. Turner.

     His judgment was deliberate, his counsel safe and wise. His heart was warm and he dealt tenderly. His friendship was strong and steady. He loved with a passionate love, yet not very demonstrative. His ministry was fruitful, many being brought into the Kingdom under his preaching.

     But he was weary; let him rest. The world is richer since he has lived in it; the Church is more glorious since he has had membership and labor in it, and Heaven is dearer and more real since he has passed through its sinning portals and entered life celestial.

     We shall meet him after the storms are over, after the battles are ended and the mists have cleared away.
                    /s/ T. S. ARMSTRONG"

     The following is from a memo written by person or persons unknown in 1914. It was provided by Rev. S. W. Turner's granddaughter, Edith Turner Wren. Most of the material has already been covered above, but a few additional details follow in their original spelling and punctuation:

     "The family of Rev. Stephen W. Turner, formerly of Tyler, was gathered together for a reunion last week at the home of Rev. Neal W. Turner, of Corsicana, Texas. This is a most remarkable family in that there has not been a death among the seven sons and two daughters, and but two deaths in their families. This was the first time the family had been assembled together since the children had began to marry and establish home for themselves.

     The following persons were present, Rev. Stephen W. Turner and wife, Dallas; Mr. Shuford J. Long, wife and daughter, Tyler; Mr. Willie F. Turner, wife and two children, Wichita Falls; Mr. Holland A. Turner, wife and daughter, Austin; Rev. Neal W. Turner, wife and two children, Corsicana; Mr. Marvin T. Turner, wife and son, of Dallas; Mr. Dora McClinton, husband and daughter, Gatesville. Mrs. Julia Garner of Cisco and Mr. Percy Turner of Dallas and Mr. Grady Turner of Brownwood, could not be present, much to the regret of all. But a most delightful occasion was enjoyed by thos. who assembled.

     . . . . /[referring to when S.W. Turner was recommended for Admission on Trial/] When the case of S. W. Turner was called his many friends stood upon the Conference floor and gave him most hearty endorsement and the highest recommendations. However it was a fact that Mr. Turner had not preached a sermon, for the time was only a few weeks between the Fourth Quarterly Conference and the session of the Annual Conference. But in spite of this fact his Presiding Elder, the Rev. Samuel Morris, said, "Bishop, he can fill any pulpit in Southern Methodism". To this the good Bishop (Kavanaugh) responded, "He certainly is the greatest preacher I ever heard of NEVER to have preached."

     . . . ./[referring to Dora Turner's stroke/] However a few years ago she suffered a stroke of paralysis in the right side which affected her considerably, but which did not entirely disable her. She has learned to write with her left hand and still does her housework and even some sewing. . . . .46 "

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
18508 years of age98th Regiment, Mecklenburg County, Virginia2
186018 years of age. The name of the village of Saint Tammany was changed to Bracey in July 1900Saint Tammany PO, Mecklenburg County, Virginia3
School Teacher. He was also registered at Emory and Henry College as a student at the same time.3,6
187028 years of age and is living in his brother, Benjamin's, household along with both of his parentsTyler, Smith County, Texas59
Farm Labor with personal property valued at $300.59
188038 years of age. His widowed mother is living with himHenderson, Rusk County, Texas60
Minister of the Gospel60
190058 years of age and married for twenty-six yearsQuanah, Hardeman County, Texas44
Minister of the Gospel who rents his home44
191069 years of age and married for thirty-six yearsMidlothian, Ellis County, Texas61
Minister61

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown.
  2. [S961] "1850 United States Federal Census," Mecklenburg County, Virginia, population schedule, 98th Regiment Township, dwelling 140, family 140, Charles G. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S68] "1860 United States Federal Census," Mecklenburg County, Virginia, population schedule, dwelling 214, family 214, Charles G. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  4. [S579] Stephen Williamson Turner Bible, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  5. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Feb 2012, memorial page for Rev Stephen Williamson Turner (1842-1916) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Julie Schwyhart, maintained by Rebecca Ewing Peterson; citing Masonic Cemetery, Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  6. [S3522] "United States, Confederate Officers Card Index, 1861-1865," images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-89Z5-3LN4?i=60&wc=M61M-229%3A369429601&cc=2145147 : accessed 24 Jun 2013), Stephen W. Turner card, Tur-Wal Surname range; images 61-62 of 2496.
  7. [S251] Luke, Joy Turner, e-mail message from (e-mail address) (Sperryville, Virginia) to Toby Turner, a History of the Sardis Methodist Church, prepared by Joy Turner Luke in 2001 and transmitted to Toby Turner.
  8. [S1751] Anonymous, "Rev. S. W. Turner", Journal of the Central Texas Conference, Fifty-First Annual Session, Methodist Episcopal Church (15-20 Nov 1916), Southern Methodist University Library.
  9. [S1052] Emory and Henry College. Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Emory And Henry College, Washington County, Va. (Wytheville: D. A. St. Clair, Printer, MDCCCLVIII-IX). A copy of which was graciously provided by Vernon Drewa.
  10. [S1054] Emory and Henry College. Catalogue of Emory and Henry College with Course of Instruction, &C., 1869-1860 (Wytheville: D. A. St. Clair, Printer, 1860), page 7. A copy of which was graciously provided by Vernon Drewa.
  11. [S1054] Emory and Henry College. Emory & Henry Catalogue, 1859-60, page 6.
  12. [S1053] Emory and Henry College. Catalogue of the Officers and Students of Emory and Henry College, Washington County, Va.,1860-1861 (Wytheville: D. A. St. Clair, Printer, 1861), page 7.A copy of which was graciously provided by Vernon Drewa.
  13. [S800] Letter from Turner, Grady (Dallas, Texas) to Ann Turner Cook, 4 Jul 1969; Library of Toby Turner (Houston, Harris County, Texas).
  14. [S1853] Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers from Virginia (Washington: National Archives), Stephen W. Turner, page 2, accessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com, citing M324.
  15. [S377] Letter from Luke, Joy Turner (Sperryville, Virginia) to Toby Turner; Library of Toby Turner (Houston, Harris County, Texas), "History of the Sardis Methodist Church," prepared by Joy Turner Luke in 2001.
  16. [S1360] Young, Bill. "Carry Me Back - The Fighting Turners," Confederate Veteran, vol. 5 (1998): page 40, 41.
  17. [S801] "Stephen Williamson Turner, C. S. A.", 29 Aug 1989, Turner Major-Ret, Grady T. (Dallas, Texas), to unknown original recipient; Library of Toby Turner, Houston, Harris County, Texas.
  18. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, page 8, 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  19. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, pages 16, 17, accessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  20. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, page 13, accessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  21. [S802] Young Jr., William A. and Young, Patricia C.. 56th Virginia Infantry (Lynchburg, Virginia: H. E. Howard, Inc., 1990), pages 183, 116.
  22. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, pages 20, 21, acccessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  23. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, page 19, accessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  24. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, pages 10-11, accessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  25. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, page 3, accessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  26. [S2869] "U. S., Civil War Prisoner of War Records, 1861-1865," database, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., (Provo, Utah) accessed accessed 7 Apr 2011. The sources for this database are: Selected Records of the War Department Commissary General of Prisoners Relating to Federal Prisoners of War Confined at Andersonville, GA, 1864-65; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M1303, 6 rolls);
    Records of the Commissary General of Prisoners, Record Group 249; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
    Selected Records of the War Department Relating to Confederate Prisoners of War, 1861-1865; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M598, 145 rolls); War Department Collection of Confederate Records, Record Group 109; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
    Lists of Confederates Captured at Vicksburg, Mississippi, July 4, 1863; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M2072, 1 roll); War Department Collection of Confederate Records, Record Group 109; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
    Register of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Citizens who Died in Federal Prisons and Military Hospitals in the North, 1861-1865; (National Archives Microfilm Publication M918, 1 roll); Records of the Office of the Quartermaster General, Record Group 92; National Archives, Washington, D.C.
  27. [S230] Drewa, Vernon, "Email, Vernon Drewa," e-mail message from e-mail address to Toby Turner, dated 8 Nov 2001 with a copy of the certificate attached.
  28. [S1749] Stephen Williamson Turner, "How The Turners Came To Texas", Turner, Grady, typescript, n.d., Library of Toby Turner, Houston, Harris County, Texas, page 1.
  29. [S1801] Barbiere, Joseph. Scraps from the Prison Table, at Camp Chase and Johnson's Island (Unknown: Elibron Classics Replica Edition, 1868; 2005), pages 105-106.
  30. [S1801] Barbiere. Scraps from the Prison Table, pages 198-199.
  31. [S1801] Barbiere. Scraps from the Prison Table, page 129.
  32. [S1801] Barbiere. Scraps from the Prison Table, page 186.
  33. [S1853] VA Compiled Service Recds. of Confed, Stephen W. Turner, page 4, accessed 5 Dec 2008, www.fold3.com.
  34. [S2869] "Civil War POWs," database, Ancestry.com Operations Inc..
  35. [S230] Drewa. Email, dated 23 Aug 2007.
  36. [S398] The East Texas Genealogical Society. Marriage Records of Smith County, Texas (Tyler: The East Texas Genealogical Society, 1979), page 17; citing Marriage Book B, page 233.
  37. [S398] The East Texas Genealogical Society. Smith Co., TX Marriages, page 171.
  38. [S1857] S. W. Turner, pages 3-5, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from the State of Texas, M (Washington: National Archives), accessed on Fold3.com.
  39. [S1857] S. W. Turner, page 6, TX Compiled Confed. Service Recds, M, accessed on Fold3.com.
  40. [S1857] S. W. Turner, page 2, TX Compiled Confed. Service Recds, M, accessed on Fold3.com.
  41. [S230] Drewa. Email, dated 7 Aug 2007 containing an ahnentafel of Stephen W. Turner; here citing A Narrative History of Brazoria County, James A. Creighton (Angleton, Texas: Brazoria County Historical Commission, 1975).
  42. [S230] Drewa. Email, dated 7 Aug 2007 containing an ahnentafel of Stephen W. Turner with a copy of the newspaper article held by his granddaughter, Edith Turner Wren.
  43. [S5780] "Texas, Marriage Index, 1824-2014," index, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com: accessed 4 Sep 2009, entry for Stephen W. Turner and Dora A. Long, 1874, Smith County, Texas; citing original data from the Texas Department of State Health Services .
  44. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Hardeman County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 32, Sheet 16, dwelling 339, family 339, Stephen W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  45. [S230] Drewa. Email, dated 23 Aug 2007, citing his research in 1990 at Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. He futher notes that future researchers may find more information about S. W. Turner there. When Mr. Drewa visited in 1990 there was no archivist of the university's records.
  46. [S1751] Anonymous. "Rev. S. W. Turner", on loan to Vernon Drewa who provided my copy.
  47. [S230] Drewa. Email, dated 23 Aug 2007, citing the Texas Christian Advocate, issue of 9 Jun 1887, page 5, column 5.
  48. [S230] Drewa. Email, dated 7 Aug 2007 containing an ahnentafel of Stephen W. Turner; citing the Texas Christian Advocate, 9 Jul 1891, page 2, column 2.
  49. [S1750] Rev. Stephen W. Turner, Turner, Grady, typescript, n.d., Library of Toby Turner, Houston, Harris County, Texas.
  50. [S800] Letter, Turner to Ann Turner Cook, 4 Jul 1969, from an enclosure within this letter.
  51. [S803] Interview with Edith Turner Wren, by Vernon Drewa, 11 May 1992. Vernon Drewa (Keller, Tarrant County, Texas), provided to Vernon Drewa on 11 May 1992 and then to Toby Turner.
  52. [S676] Stephen Williamson Turner, pension application File No. 22649; Photocopy of original pension file, Texas State Archives (Austin, Texas #22649; copy in the possession of Toby Turner received 15 Sep 1999., imaged from Soldier's Application for a Pension, National Archives microfilm publication Confederate Pension File.
  53. [S230] Drewa. Email, dated 7 Aug 2007 containing an ahnentafel of Stephen W. Turner; here citing and transcribing the article. Despite multiple online searches in newspapers archives, I have been unable to determine either the date of name of the newspaper.
  54. [S579] Stephen Williamson Turner Bible, imported 3 Sep 1998.
  55. [S5220] "Wills and Probate Records, 1800-2000," index and images, Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com) accessed 7 Sep 2015, entry for Stephen Williamson Turner, Case Number 1731, Administrators Records Docket, 1851-1999, 1906-1921; citing original data from the Ellis County Court, Probate Docket Index, 1850-1988.
  56. [S5220] "Ellis Co., TX Probate Recds., 1850-1941," index and images, Ancestry.com, entry for Stephen Williamson Turner, Case Number 1731, Probate Records, Vol. D, Guardians, Administrators and Executors, 1912-1921.
  57. [S5714] "Texas, Wills and Probate Records, 1833-1974," index and images, Ancestry.com, (www.ancestry.com) accessed 5 Jul 2018, entry for S. W. Turner, 20 Jun 1916, Packet 1684-1766, Probate Records, 1850-1941; Probate Docket Index, 1850-1988; Author: Texas, County Court (Ellis County); Probate Place: Ellis, Texas.
  58. [S1749] Stephen Williamson Turner, "How The Turners Came To Texas", typescript, n.d. Library of Toby Turner.
  59. [S672] "1870 United States Federal Census," Smith County, Texas, population schedule, Tyler Beat No 1 Township, dwelling 309, family 311, Benj Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  60. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Rusk County, Texas, population schedule, Henderson Township, Enumeration District (ED) 72, Sheet 12, dwelling 104, family 112, S. W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  61. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Ellis County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct No 6 Township, Enumeration District (ED) 143, dwelling 62, family 62, Stephen W Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  62. [S176] East Texas Genealogical Society. Cemetery Records of Smith County, Texas, I (Tyler: The East Texas Genealogical Society, 1981), page 29.
  63. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JFBM-6BF : accessed 19 Dec 2012), Willie F. Turner, 12 Mar 1920; citing Texas, United States, reference 9715, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,073,750.
  64. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Holland Alexander Turner, 20 Jan 1960; citing New Braunfels, Comal, Texas, reference Item 1 cn7801, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,116,164, accessed 11 Mar 2010.
  65. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Wral Turner, 22 Aug 1914; citing Corsicana, Navarro, Texas, reference cn 17356, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,051,129, accessed 3 Aug 2009. This is the worst indexing error I've ever encountered; I can read it as Neal.
  66. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Julia Rainey Garner, 10 Sep 1967; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, reference cn 57184, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,138,739, accessed 12 Apr 2009. Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 2369 of 3524 to see it.
  67. [S3458] "Tennessee Deaths, 1914-1966," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NS71-J89 : accessed 15 Jan 2014), Marvin T. Turner, 1946; citing Woodlawn Cemetery, Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee, cn 9367, State Library and Archives, Nashville; FHL microfilm 2,137,370.
  68. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Percy Lee Turner, 29 Nov 1971; citing Midland, Midland, Texas, reference 82029, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,223,415, accessed 7 Jul 2010. His son, the informant on the death certificate, names him Stephen "Lee" Turner.

Marvin Thompson Turner1

M, #261, b. 25 April 1886, d. 7 May 1946
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner2,3 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford2,3 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916

Family

Nelle Harris b. 29 Sep 1890, d. 11 Oct 1957
Children
Last Edited1 Oct 2019
     Marvin Thompson Turner was born on 25 April 1886 in Tyler, Smith County, Texas,3 and was baptized on 19 December 1886 by Reverend Joel T. Davis.

     Marvin Thompson Turner married Nelle Harris circa 1908. I cannot find a marriage record for them in Texas or elsewhere as of 17 Aug 2016. On her husband's death certificate she is listed as Nelle Harris Turner, so I'm guessing Harris is her surname.4

     In 1938, when their daughter married, they were apparently living at Richmond, Virginia.5

     Marvin Thompson Turner was Sales Director of Methodist Publishing Company prior to his death.3

     Marvin Thompson Turner died on 7 May 1946 at age 60 in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee,3 and was buried on 9 May 1946 in Woodlawn Memorial Park and Mausoleum, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee.3,6

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190014 years of ageQuanah, Hardeman County, Texas2
191023 years of age and married for two yearsDallas, Dallas County, Texas4
Advertising Manager for a publishing house who owned his home free of mortgage4
192033 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas7
Druggist and owner of a drugstore who works on his own account. I don't understand the abbreviation [Um] under the home ownership columns.7
193043 years of age and married for for the first time at age 22Richmond, Henrico County, Virginia8
General Manager, Methodist Publishing who owns his home valued at $10,500 (worth $142,643.30 in 2012 dollars) and a radio set8
194053 years of ageRichmond, Virginia9
General Manager, Publishing House9

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Hardeman County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 32, Sheet 16, dwelling 339, family 339, Stephen W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S3458] "Tennessee Deaths, 1914-1966," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NS71-J89 : accessed 15 Jan 2014), Marvin T. Turner, 1946; citing Woodlawn Cemetery, Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee, cn 9367, State Library and Archives, Nashville; FHL microfilm 2,137,370.
  4. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 35, Sheet 6B, dwelling 136, family 140, Marvin T Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  5. [S5557] "Virginia, Marriage Records, 1936-2014," index and images, Ancestry.com (www.ancestry.com: accessed 1 Oct 2019, entry for Nell Frances Turner and Joseph Cockrell Adams, 1938, Richmond, Virginia, image 356 of 434; citing original data from the Virginia Department of Health, Richmond, Virginia.
  6. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 10 Oct 2018, memorial page for Marvin Thompson Turner (1885-1946) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Martha McCorkle, maintained by Martha McCorkle; citing Woodlawn Memorial Park and Mausoleum, Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  7. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 118, Sheet 2B, dwelling 30, family 36, M. T. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  8. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Henrico County, Virginia, population schedule, Richmond City Township, Enumeration District (ED) 116-104, Sheet 19A, dwelling 42, family 94, Marvin T. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  9. [S3273] "1940 United States Federal Census," digital images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VTMX-V4N ): accessed 1 Oct 2019), Marvin Turner, Lee Ward, Richmond, Richmond City, Richmond City, Virginia, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 118-118, sheet 1A, line 12, family 4, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 - 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 4323.

Holland Alexander Turner1,2

M, #262, b. 13 April 1877, d. 20 January 1960
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner3,2 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford3,2 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916

Family

Annie Bealle Matthews b. 9 Jul 1884, d. 3 Nov 1948
Child
Last Edited17 Jun 2017
     Holland Alexander Turner was born on 13 April 1877 in Henderson, Rusk County, Texas,3,4 and baptized. By Reverend R. W. Thompson.

     According to Grady T. Turner, Holland served as a Private with Company K, 8th U. S. Engineer Regiment in training for the invasion of Cuba during the Spanish-American War.5 He and Annie Bealle Matthews were marr recd on 29 April 1908 at Coryell County, Texas.6,7,8

     Holland Alexander Turner, 31, married Annie Bealle Matthews, 23, daughter of Anthony Matthews and Katherine Minerva Gardner, on 30 April 1908 in Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas, with the groom's father, Rev. S. W. Turner, officiating.8

     Holland was a lawyer in Austin who died in middle age after his brother, William Franklin Turner. Pauline Shepard Turner McClinton says he was in the banking business in Austin. So much for this jewel of information: I don't call 82 years of age as being in middle-aged!

     Holland Alexander Turner was, prior to his death, a retired Secretary of the Board of Regents of State Teachers College who had resided in New Braunsfels for 10 years.2

     Holland Alexander Turner died about 5:45 pm of a myocardial infarction due to extensive arteriosclerosis with thrombosis, complete occlusion of the anterior descending branch of the left coronary and refusal to go back into the hospital on 20 January 1960 at age 82 in New Braunfels, Comal County, Texas,2 and was buried on 22 January 1960 in Austin Memorial Park Cemetery, Austin, Travis County, Texas.7,2

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1880as H. A. and 3 years of ageHenderson, Rusk County, Texas3
1920with an unreadable ageAustin, Travis County, Texas6
Bookkeeper in a bank who works for a salary and who rents his home6
193052 years of age and married for the first time at age 30Austin, Travis County, Texas9
Cashier at a Bank who owned his home valued at $5,000 and owned a radio.9

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDLG-778 : accessed 11 Mar 2010), Holland Alexander Turner, 20 Jan 1960; citing New Braunfels, Comal, Texas, reference Item 1 cn7801, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,116,164.
  3. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Rusk County, Texas, population schedule, Henderson Township, Enumeration District (ED) 72, Sheet 12, dwelling 104, family 112, S. W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  4. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Holland Alexander Turner, 20 Jan 1960; citing New Braunfels, Comal, Texas, reference Item 1 cn7801, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,116,164, accessed 11 Mar 2010. Provides only date of birth and the state of Texas, no county or city named.
  5. [S1742] Letter from Turner, Grady (Dallas, Texas) to Joy Turner Luke, 11 Jun 1987; unknown repository (unknown repository address), in an attachment to this letter entitled "The Warring Turners'.
  6. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Travis County, Texas, population schedule, Austin Township, Enumeration District (ED) 102, Sheet 8A, dwelling 165, family 155, Holland A Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  7. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Sep 2012, memorial page for Holland Alexander Turner (1877-1960) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Robert Sage, maintained by Jan Wukasch Pelosi; citing Austin Memorial Park Cemetery, Austin, Travis County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  8. [S5502] "Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QK85-K8ZC : accessed 30 Jul 2016), Holland A. Turner and Anna Bealle Matthews, 29 Apr 1908, Marriage; citing Coryell, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 984,714.
  9. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Travis County, Texas, population schedule, Austin Township, Enumeration District (ED) 227-25, Sheet 10A, dwelling 198, family 250, H. A. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Neal Waskom Turner1

M, #263, b. 18 February 1879, d. 22 August 1914
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner2,3 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford2 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916
Neal Waskom Turner

Family

Martha Ellen Eddleman b. 17 Nov 1878, d. 28 Dec 1958
Children
Last Edited28 May 2019
     Neal Waskom Turner was born on 18 February 1879 in Henderson, Rusk County, Texas,4,5 and baptized. By Reverend R. W. Thompson.

     Neal Waskom Turner, 21, married Martha Ellen Eddleman, 22, daughter of Reuben Wesley Eddleman and Elizabeth Jane Lovel, on 22 November 1900 in Cisco, Eastland County, Texas. I cannot find a marriage record for them as of 26 Dec 2016 on either FamilySearch OR Ancestry.com.6

     He was the Methodist minister at Corsicana, Texas.3

     Neal Waskom Turner died of accidental drowning while trying to save his son and another boy from drowning on 22 August 1914 at age 35 in Corsicana, Navarro County, Texas,7,3 and was buried on 25 November 1914 in Oakwood Cemetery, Cisco, Eastland County, Texas.8,9

     "This morning about 8 o'clock Rev. Neil (sic) W. Turner, pastor of the Sixteenth Avenue Methodist Church, accompanied by his wife and two children and a number of boys, went to a lake about three miles west of town for a picnic. Soon after reaching the lake four or five of the boys went out in a boat. It seems that their weight overloaded the boat and it began to 'dip' and some of the boys jumped out."

     "Mr. Turner, seeing their predicament and peril of the boys, called to them to hold on to the boat, and then he jumped into the water to rescue them. As Mr. Turner reached the boat his son, Herman, and Earl Wooley threw their arms about his neck and the three went down together in about seven feet of water. The bodies never came up again, all three being drowned."

     "The bodies were in the water about thirty minutes before they were rescued. Mr. Turner is a well known Methodist preacher and has been here about three years. His father lives in Dallas. No funeral arrangements have been made yet."

From The August 1914 Texas Advocate:
     "Rev. Neal Turner, pastor of our Eleventh Avenue Church, Corsicana was drowned in a lake near that city. . . . The news of this tragedy filled the Central Texas Conference and even a wider circle with grief almost unimaginable."

From The Central Texas Conference Annual Session of 1915:
     "Neal W. Turner was a prince among men. Nature had generously endowed him with gifts. Physically he was every inch a man - - athletic, handsome, and possessed of a winning personality. HIs intellect was of high order and finely poised. In breadth and sweep of soul he was God's nobleman. There was nothing little in his entire make-up. The associate with him was to feel the kinship of a real man and catch the inspiration of a noble life."

     Mrs. Edith Turner Wren said on 12 May 1992: "My father had no life insurance until just one time before his death he visited a numerologist who told him he would meet with an accidental death. He went immediately and took out a $3000.00 life insurance policy. If it had not been for that money, my mother would have been in a bad position financially."9

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1880as Neal W., and 1 year of ageHenderson, Rusk County, Texas2
1900as 21 years of age and singleCisco, Eastland County, Texas10
Druggist who rented his home10
191031 years of age and married for nine yearsMeridian, Bosque County, Texas11
Minister of the Gospel11

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Rusk County, Texas, population schedule, Henderson Township, Enumeration District (ED) 72, Sheet 12, dwelling 104, family 112, S. W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JXCY-ZJ4 : accessed 3 Aug 2009), Wral Turner, 22 Aug 1914; citing Corsicana, Navarro, Texas, reference cn 17356, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,051,129 This is the worst indexing error I've ever encountered; I can read it as Neal.
  4. [S245] Cawyer, Shirley Brittain and Hudson, Weldon I.Cawyer, Shirley Brittain and Hudson, Weldon I., compiler. Eastland County, Texas Cemetery Inscriptions, III (n.p.: S.l., 197?), page 39, The place of birth comes from Vernon Drewa..
  5. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Wral Turner, 22 Aug 1914; citing Corsicana, Navarro, Texas, reference cn 17356, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,051,129, accessed 3 Aug 2009. This is the worst indexing error I've ever encountered; I can read it as Neal. No place of birth is provided.
  6. [S230] Drewa, Vernon, "Email, Vernon Drewa," e-mail message from e-mail address to Toby Turner, dated 16 Sep 1997 containing a report entitled Turner Family, page 10.
  7. [S245] Cawyer and HudsonCawyer and Hudson. Eastland Co., TX Cems., III, page 39, The place of death comes from Vernon Drewa..
  8. [S245] Cawyer and HudsonCawyer and Hudson. Eastland Co., TX Cems., III, page 39, The date of burial comes from Vernon Drewa..
  9. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 5 Mar 2013, memorial page for Rev Neal Waskom Turner (1879-1914) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by PickledDuncan, maintained by PickledDuncan; citing Oakwood Cemetery, Cisco, Eastland County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  10. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Town Township, Enumeration District (ED) 61, Sheet 15, dwelling 325, family 327, Neal Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  11. [S5516] "United States Federal Census, 1910," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:M2MY-9HF ): accessed 5 Aug 2018), Neal W Turner, Meridian, Bosque, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) ED 1, sheet 4A, family 77, NARA microfilm publication T624 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1982), roll 1533; FHL microfilm 1,375,546.
  12. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Herman Turner, 22 Aug 1914; citing Corsicana, Navarro, Texas, reference cn 17354, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,051,129, accessed 3 Sep 2009.
  13. [S2702] Find A Grave. Memorial page for Edith W. Wren (1906-2002) at memorial page....

Percy Lee Turner1,2

M, #264, b. 10 August 1888, d. 29 November 1971
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner3,4 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford3 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916

Family

Mary Juhan Teal b. 19 Apr 1891, d. 19 Jul 1976
Children
Last Edited22 Oct 2019
     Percy Lee Turner was born on 10 August 1888 in Tyler, Smith County, Texas,3,2 and baptized on 10 February 1889 by Reverend D. F. C. Timmons.5

     Percy Lee Turner married Mary Juhan Teal. I cannot find a marriage record for them anywhere on FamilySearch or Ancestry as of 1 Oct 2019 using any variation of her surname (Lex, Teal, or Juhan.)6

     He was the Publisher of Southwest Press which published Southwest Review, edited by Leslie Turner's teacher, Mr. Magines. He also owned a bookstore at Southern Methodist University.

     Percy Lee Turner was a retired Publisher.2

     Percy Lee Turner died of pulmonary embolus (duration of 15 minutes) due to cochexia due to prostatic cancer & metasteses with a contributory cause of influenza on 29 November 1971 at age 83 in Midland, Midland County, Texas,2 and was buried in Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.2,7

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190011 years of ageQuanah, Hardeman County, Texas3
1910unable to find him anyplace in the United States
192030 years of age and is living in his father-in-law's household. Unfortunately, his father-in-law's name is completely illegible, as is the dwelling and household number. The father-in-law's listing is on the previous page from what I've noted and, unusually, the enumerator didn't carry forward the surname. No occupation is listedDallas, Dallas County, Texas6
193041 years of age and married for the first time at age 24. Unfortunately, his wife's name is illegible. Also living in his household were two Negro servants, Nancy (29) and Ozie (25) FaganHighland Park, Dallas County, Texas8
Proprietor of a Publishing Company who owns his home valued at $4,510 and a radio set8
194049 years of ageHighland Park, Dallas County, Texas9
Publisher, Publishing Company9

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6DR-YPJ : accessed 7 Jul 2010), Percy Lee Turner, 29 Nov 1971; citing Midland, Midland, Texas, reference 82029, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,223,415.
  3. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Hardeman County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 32, Sheet 16, dwelling 339, family 339, Stephen W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  4. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Percy Lee Turner, 29 Nov 1971; citing Midland, Midland, Texas, reference 82029, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,223,415, accessed 7 Jul 2010. His son, the informant on the death certificate, names him Stephen "Lee" Turner.
  5. [S230] Drewa, Vernon, "Email, Vernon Drewa," e-mail message from e-mail address to Toby Turner.
  6. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 57, Sheet 3A, dwelling 46, family 50, Thoms H [?] household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  7. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 18 Aug 2016, memorial page for Percy Lee Turner (1888-1971) at memorial page... Maintained by Martha McCorkle; citing Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  8. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Highland Park Township, Enumeration District (ED) 57-97, Sheet 32B, dwelling 347, family 347, Percy L. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  9. [S3273] "1940 United States Federal Census," digital images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KWJ2-FZS ): accessed 2 Oct 2019), Percy Turner, Tract D4, Highland Park, Justice Precinct 1, Dallas, Texas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 57-5B, sheet 2B, line 41, family 40, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 - 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 4015.
  10. [S2855] "Texas Birth Certificates, 1903-1935," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X2JQ-4GM: accessed 18 Aug 2016), Beverly Teal Turner, 23 Oct 1918; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, United States, certificate 51322, Bureau of Vital Statistics. State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 4,491,056.

Grady T. Turner1

M, #265, b. 30 December 1894, d. 1 July 1990
Relationship3rd great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner2 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford2 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916

Family 1

Carmen (--?--) b. c 1895, d. c 1920

Family 2

Marcella Mary Henry b. 24 Jan 1899, d. c May 1956

Family 3

Anne Theresa Connelly b. 2 Jul 1908, d. 11 Dec 1960
Last Edited10 Jun 2019
     Grady T. Turner was born on 30 December 1894, son of Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner and Dora Anna Shuford, in Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas.3 Grady T. Turner was baptized on 2 November 1895 at Fort Worth, Tarrant County, Texas, by Reverend E. Y. Cox. He was baptized at Polytechnic College where his father was a professor.4

     He attended elementary public school in Gatesville and Midlothian, Texas, and high school in Dallas, Texas.4

     He performed his Military Service between 1917 and 1919 in the U. S. Army between 1917-1918. He attended the First Officers Training School. He served in the 89th Infantry Division and the 10th Infantry Division..4

     Grady T. Turner married Carmen (--?--) circa 1918. This marriage date could be incorrect if Billy B., born c 1915, was their son. I cannot find a marriage anywhere in the United States or Mexico. I've searched FamilySearch as well as Ancestry.Com. I have worked on this repeatedly over the years with no success as of 26 Mar 2017.

     Grady T. Turner ended military service on 25 January 1919. He was discharged as a First Lieutenant.4

     Grady married Marcella Mary Henry circa 1924 at New York City, New York County, New York. No sign of this marriage can be found on the FHL online record search in New York City or county.5

     Grady T. Turner, 43, married Anne Theresa Connelly, 30, daughter of David Connelly and Anne Donahue, on 22 October 1938 in Baltimore, Maryland. I can't find this marriage in FamilySeach online records in Maryland or Philadelphia marriage records. I can't find it anywhere in the United States on either FamilySearch OR Ancestry.com as of 15 Apr 2017.

     He performed his Military Service between 1942 and 1945 in the 8th Service Command at Fort Sam Houston and in Dallas, Texas. From 1942 to April 1, 1945, he served in Headquarters supervision over all the Signal Corps Repair Shops in the 8th Service Command. He was discharged as a Major.4

     After completing his freshman year in high school, he took what he expected to be a temporary summer job with the Western Electric Company installing telephone central equipment. After completing his military service during World War II, he returned to Western Electric as Service Manager in Dallas. The job lasted almost half a century, until January 1, 1960.4

     Grady T. Turner died on 1 July 1990 at age 95 in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas,6,7 and was buried in Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.8

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
19005 years of ageQuanah, Hardeman County, Texas2
191015 years of ageMidlothian, Ellis County, Texas9
192025 years of age. as the second head of household who's living within this particular dwellingKansas City, Jackson County, Missouri10
Switchboard Installer who works for wages and rents his home10
192530 years of ageNew York City, New York County, New York11
Engineer11
193034 years of age and married for the first time at age 28Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania5
Manager of an Electric Company5
194044 years of age and living with his wife and daughterPhiladelphia, Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania12

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Hardeman County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 32, Sheet 16, dwelling 339, family 339, Stephen W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S70] "1900 U. S. Census," Hardeman County, Texas, pop. sch., ED 32, Sheet 16, dwell. 339, fam. 339, Stephen W. Turner household, Roll 1641, page 222B (using surname search) or 222D (using roll and page number search); for some inexplicable reason, the 1930 census reports him born in New York.
  4. [S3038] Grady T. Turner, Typed manuscript, Library of Toby Turner, Houston, Harris County, Texas.
  5. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, population schedule, Philadelphia, Ward 42 Township, Enumeration District (ED) 51-1029, Sheet 2A, family 35, Grady Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  6. [S605] Turner, Stephen Grady, "Turner, Stephen Grady Email," to Toby Turner, dated 22 Sep 2003.
  7. [S2610] "Texas Death Index, 1903-2000," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VZ8H-6Y9 : accessed 10 Jun 2019), Grady Turner, 01 Jul 1990; from "Texas, Death Index, 1903-2000," database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2006); citing certificate number , Dallas, Texas, Texas Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, AustinOriginal source no longer available.
  8. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 15 Jan 2014, memorial page for Grady T Turner (1894-1990) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Becky Romo, maintained by Becky Romo; citing Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  9. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Ellis County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct No 6 Township, Enumeration District (ED) 143, dwelling 62, family 62, Stephen W Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  10. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Jackson County, Missouri, population schedule, Kaw Township, Enumeration District (ED) 57, Sheet 11A, dwelling 200, family 295, Grady T Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  11. [S3830] "New York, State Census, 1925," index to associated digital images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/KS7W-MM1 from which I connected to the original image on Ancestry.com ): accessed 29 Jun 2014), Grady Turner, New York, New York.
  12. [S3273] "1940 United States Federal Census," digital images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KQWT-FPL ): accessed 13 Jun 2016), Grady T Turner, Ward 38, Philadelphia, Philadelphia City, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 51-1408, sheet 1B, family 25, Sixteenth Census of the United States, 1940, NARA digital publication T627. Records of the Bureau of the Census, 1790 - 2007, RG 29. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 2012, roll 3732.

Dora Blanche Turner1

F, #266, b. 20 May 1883, d. 3 March 1980
Relationship3rd great-granddaughter of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner2 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford2 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916

Family 1

Benjamin Holmes McClinton b. 7 Aug 1882, d. 9 Jul 1926
Children

Family 2

L. E. Richardson b. Jan 1881, d. 28 Mar 1944
Last Edited10 Jun 2019
     Dora Blanche Turner was born on 20 May 1883 in Tyler, Smith County, Texas,2,3 and baptized. By Reverend W. A. Sampey.4

     Dora Blanche Turner, 20, married Benjamin Holmes McClinton, 21, son of Benjamin F. McClinton and Zelia Ziemma Poole, on 8 November 1903 in Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas. Rev. Stephen W. Turner, father of the bride, officiated at the marriage ceremony. He filed the marriage record on 9 Nov 1903 and it was recorded on the 10th.5,6

     She lived in Abilene, Texas. Her daughter looked like Leslie Turner's sister, Elizabeth.

     Dora Blanche Turner and L. E. Richardson obtained a marriage license on 13 May 1932 in Longview, Gregg County, Texas.7

     Dora Blanche McClinton, 48, married L. E. Richardson, 51, son of (--?--) Richardson and Henry (--?--), on 14 May 1932 in Gregg County, Texas, with J. M. Johnson, pastor of First Methodist Church officiating.7

     Dora Blanche Richardson died on 3 March 1980 at age 96 in Abilene, Taylor County, Texas,8,9,3 and was buried in Masonic Cemetery, Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas.8,3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190017 years of ageQuanah, Hardeman County, Texas2
191026 years of age and having borne one child who is livingGatesville, Coryell County, Texas10
192030 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas11
1930as head of household and listed 45 years of age, a widow and married for the first time at age 21. Also living in her household was a Lodger, Harry A. Hoy, age 45, divorced, and a chiropractorCisco, Eastland County, Texas12
Voice Teacher who owns her own home valued at $3,000. She does not own a radio set12

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Hardeman County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 32, Sheet 16, dwelling 339, family 339, Stephen W. Turner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 9 Mar 2012, memorial page for Dora Blanche Turner McClinton (1883-1980) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Julie Schwyhart, maintained by Rebecca Ewing Peterson; citing Masonic Cemetery, Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  4. [S230] Drewa, Vernon, "Email, Vernon Drewa," e-mail message from e-mail address to Toby Turner.
  5. [S202] Coryell County Genealogical Society. Marriage book, Coryell County, Texas : alphabetized by bride and groom, 1897-1904, Book 6 (Gatesville: Coryell County Genealogical Society, 1998), page 42, Wedding Book 6, page 511.
  6. [S1665] Coryell County, Texas Marriages, vols. 5-6, 1892-1906, FHL Film 0,984,713 #2, microfilm of original records at the Coryell County courthouse in Gatesville, Texas, Ben H. McCliinton and Dora B. Turner, vol. 6, page 511.
  7. [S5502] "Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QV1H-Q69R : accessed 25 Jul 2016), L E Richardson and Dora Mcclinton, 14 May 1932, Marriage; citing Gregg, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 1,468,702.
  8. [S1214] Coryell Museum and Historical Center, compiler. Families of Coryell County, Texas (Gatesville: Pediment Publishing, 2004), page 145.
  9. [S2610] "Texas Death Index, 1903-2000," index, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VZXB-15G : accessed 10 Jun 2019), Dora Richardson, 09 Mar 1980; from "Texas, Death Index, 1903-2000," database, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2006); citing certificate number , Taylor, Texas, Texas Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit, AustinSays she died 9 Mar 1980; original source no longer available.
  10. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Coryell County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 33, Sheet 3B, dwelling 54, family 57, B H McClinton household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  11. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 118, Sheet 20B, dwelling 363, family 425, B. L. McClinton household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  12. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 67-26, Sheet 32B, dwelling 219, family 244, Dora B. McClinton household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  13. [S72] "1920 U. S. Census," Eastland County, Texas, pop. sch., ED 118, Sheet 20B, dwell. 363, fam. 425, B. L. McClinton household, Roll 1797, page 253B if using name search and 253D if using roll and page number search.

Julia Rainey Turner1,2

F, #267, b. 16 November 1880, d. 10 September 1967
Relationship3rd great-granddaughter of Terisha Turner
FatherRev. Stephen Williamson Turner2 b. 21 Mar 1842, d. 16 May 1916
MotherDora Anna Shuford2 b. 17 Sep 1850, d. 22 Mar 1916

Family

John H. Garner b. 23 Aug 1874, d. 9 Jul 1953
Children
Last Edited2 Jul 2017
     Julia Rainey Turner was born on 16 November 1880 in Tyler, Smith County, Texas,3,4 and baptized on 17 April 1891. By Rev. J. A. Waskom.

     Julia Rainey Turner, 18, married John H. Garner, 24, son of James K. Garner and Ellen Clegg, on 21 December 1898 in Cisco, Eastland County, Texas.3

     According to Grady Turner, Julia "often spoke of how the cowboys, after a Saturday night on the town, rode boisterously by their house, on the way back to the Ranch." . . .

     Julia was an accomplished musician; [playing the] piano and organ. She and my other sister, Dora Blanche, sang solos, in the Church, accompanied by my Sister Julia. . . . Julia was also an artist, making beautiful charcoal pictures of persons, including family members."5

     Julia Rainey Garner died of cerebral vascular accident due to generalized arteriosclerosis due to terminal hemorrhaghic diathesis on 10 September 1967 at age 86 in Dallas,2 and was buried on 12 September 1967 in Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.2,6

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190019 years of age and reports having borne one child who is still livingCisco, Eastland County, Texas3
191029 years of age and having borne three children of whom two were livingCisco, Eastland County, Texas7
192039 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas8
193049 years of age and married for the first time at 16 (I think this should've been 18)Highland Park, Dallas County, Texas9

Citations

  1. [S579] Turner, Stephen Williamson and Turner, Dora A., The Pictorial Bible of Stephen Williamson Turner (n.a.: n.a., n.d.); present owner unknown, location unknown, Date of Import: Sep 3, 1998.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDVT-THT : accessed 12 Apr 2009), Julia Rainey Garner, 10 Sep 1967; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, reference cn 57184, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,138,739 Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 2369 of 3524 to see it.
  3. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 61, Sheet 10, dwelling 191, family 192, John Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  4. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Julia Rainey Garner, 10 Sep 1967; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, reference cn 57184, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,138,739, accessed 12 Apr 2009. Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 2369 of 3524 to see it. Says only Smith County, Texas.
  5. [S604] Letter from Turner, Grady (Dallas, Texas) to Joy Turner Luke, March 30, 1990; unknown repository (unknown repository address). He this letter he said he was 95 on the previous December 30., containing A Biography of Rev. Stephen W. Turner, dated August 22, 1987, written by his son, Grady Turner.
  6. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 6 Dec 2016, memorial page for Julia Rainey Turner Garner (1880-1967) at memorial page... Maintained by Martha McCorkle; citing Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  7. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 48, Sheet 22B, dwelling 491, family 498, John H Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  8. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct No. 6 Township, Enumeration District (ED) 118, Sheet 8B, dwelling 158, family 172, J. H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  9. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Highland Park Township, Enumeration District (ED) 57-97, Sheet 61A, dwelling 629, family 629, John H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  10. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, J. Turner Garner, 08 Feb 1953; citing Brownwood, Brown, Texas, cn 6545, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,113,847, accessed 8 Jul 2010. Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 55 of 3545 to see it.
  11. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Dorothy Ann Garner, 12 Dec 1976; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, United States, reference 90548, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,243,985, accessed 6 Jul 2010.

John H. Garner1

M, #268, b. 23 August 1874, d. 9 July 1953
FatherJames K. Garner1
MotherEllen Clegg1

Family

Julia Rainey Turner b. 16 Nov 1880, d. 10 Sep 1967
Children
Last Edited28 May 2019
     John H. Garner was born on 23 August 1874, son of James K. Garner and Ellen Clegg, in Lawrenceburg, Lawrence County, Tennessee.2,1

     John Garner came to Texas from Tennessee to make his fortune. In a biography of Rev. Stephen W. Turner, Grady Turner says, "John Garner's meteoric rise in the business world was really a Horatio Alger story. He had arrived in Texas pennyless(sic) and went to work, as a janitor in the Davis Drygoods Store. Mr. Davis let him sleep in the store, as a part of his pay. Gradually he advanced to salesman, saved his money, bought a partnership with Mr. Davis, later buying him out and become (sic) sole owner, and remained so, the rest of his life.

     Gradually, Mr. Garner expanded into Rising Star, Breckenridge, Hamilton, Brownwood in West Texas and became one of the largest stockholders in the Mercantile Bank in Dallas.

     Mr. Garner was a 'main-stay' in the Methodist Church at Cisco and was a very important factor in the building of the new Church in 1920 or 1921. He had a great admiration for my Mother and Father, and in memory of them, presented the new church with two stained glass windows; one for Mother and one for Father.

     The Turner Family is very grateful for this fine tribute to our Parents."
Signed: Grady T. Turner, August 22, 1987.

     John H. Garner, 24, married Julia Rainey Turner, 18, daughter of Rev. Stephen Williamson Turner and Dora Anna Shuford, on 21 December 1898 in Cisco, Eastland County, Texas.2

     John H. Garner died of coronary thrombosis (duration of 30 minutes) due to transurethal prostate resection during which benign hyperpenia of prostate gland was found on 9 July 1953 at age 78 in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas,1 and was buried on 11 July 1953 in Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.1,3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
190025 years of age and married for two yearsCisco, Eastland County, Texas2
Dry Goods Merchant who rents his home2
191035 years of age and married for eleven yearsCisco, Eastland County, Texas4
Dry Goods Merchant who owns his home free of mortgage4
192045 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas5
Owner of a Dry Goods Emporium who is an employer and owns his home free of mortgage5
193056 years of age. He reports having married for the first time at age 26. Also living in his household was a servant Dora Philips, a Negro, who is 27 years of age. He is indexed BlackHighland Park, Dallas County, Texas6
Proprietor of a Mercantile Store who owns his home valued at $30,000 (worth $407,580.85 in 2012 dollars) and a radio set6

Citations

  1. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J6SD-5YS : accessed 6 Jul 2010), John H. Garner, 09 Jul 1953; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, reference cn 35016, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,113,927 Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 2107 of 3511 to see it.
  2. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 61, Sheet 10, dwelling 191, family 192, John Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 6 Dec 2016, memorial page for John H Garner (1874-1953) at memorial page... Maintained by Martha McCorkle; citing Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  4. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 48, Sheet 22B, dwelling 491, family 498, John H Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  5. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct No. 6 Township, Enumeration District (ED) 118, Sheet 8B, dwelling 158, family 172, J. H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  6. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Highland Park Township, Enumeration District (ED) 57-97, Sheet 61A, dwelling 629, family 629, John H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  7. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, J. Turner Garner, 08 Feb 1953; citing Brownwood, Brown, Texas, cn 6545, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,113,847, accessed 8 Jul 2010. Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 55 of 3545 to see it.
  8. [S2608] "TX Deaths , 1890-1976," FamilySearch, Dorothy Ann Garner, 12 Dec 1976; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, United States, reference 90548, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,243,985, accessed 6 Jul 2010.

James Turner Garner

M, #269, b. 10 November 1899, d. 8 February 1953
Relationship4th great-grandson of Terisha Turner
FatherJohn H. Garner1,2 b. 23 Aug 1874, d. 9 Jul 1953
MotherJulia Rainey Turner1,2 b. 16 Nov 1880, d. 10 Sep 1967

Family

Mary Katherine Boon b. 8 Nov 1908, d. 9 Sep 1992
Last Edited2 Jul 2017
     James Turner Garner was born on 10 November 1899, son of John H. Garner and Julia Rainey Turner, in Texas.1,2 He was also known as Turner Garner.3,4

     He was held up to Leslie Turner as an example which didn't endear him to Leslie. Turner Garner went to Harvard or Yale and Texas University where he was editor of the college magazine and was suspended for contents. He became a lawyer. He died fairly young.

     James Turner Garner, 33, married Mary Katherine Boon, 24 on 26 December 1932 in Brownwood, Brown County, Texas.5,6

     James Turner Garner was a married Dry Goods Store Manager prior to his death.2

     James Turner Garner died of cerebral apoplexy (paralysis due to stroke) due to hypertension on 8 February 1953 at age 53 in Brownwood, Brown County, Texas,2 and was buried on 10 February 1953 in Greenleaf Cemetery, Brownwood, Brown County, Texas.2,7

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
19006/12 year of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas1
1910as Turner and 10 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas3
192020 years of age and is living in his father's householdCisco, Eastland County, Texas4
1930as Turner and 30 years of age, single and is living in his father's household. No occupation is listed for himHighland Park, Dallas County, Texas8

Citations

  1. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 61, Sheet 10, dwelling 191, family 192, John Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JX6H-DLJ : accessed 8 Jul 2010), J. Turner Garner, 08 Feb 1953; citing Brownwood, Brown, Texas, cn 6545, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,113,847 Index may link to the wrong death certificate, go to image 55 of 3545 to see it.
  3. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 48, Sheet 22B, dwelling 491, family 498, John H Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  4. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct No. 6 Township, Enumeration District (ED) 118, Sheet 8B, dwelling 158, family 172, J. H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  5. [S3741] "Texas, Birth Index, 1903-1997," index citing Ancestry.com, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VD64-891 : accessed 6 Dec 2016), James Turner Junior Garner, 05 Mar 1943; citing "Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997," database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2005); citing Texas Department of State Health Services,.
  6. [S5502] "Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QK85-YY2T : accessed 6 Dec 2016), James Turner Garner and Mary Katherine Boon, 26 Dec 1932, Marriage; citing Brownwood, Brown, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 1,533,477.
  7. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 6 Dec 2016, memorial page for James Turner Garner, Sr (1899-1953) at memorial page... Maintained by PVGS Greenleaf, originally created by MemorialsbyJMiller; citing Greenleaf Cemetery, Brownwood, Brown County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  8. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Highland Park Township, Enumeration District (ED) 57-97, Sheet 61A, dwelling 629, family 629, John H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Dorothy Ann Garner1,2

F, #270, b. 13 April 1907, d. 12 December 1976
Relationship4th great-granddaughter of Terisha Turner
FatherJohn H. Garner1,2 b. 23 Aug 1874, d. 9 Jul 1953
MotherJulia Rainey Turner1,2 b. 16 Nov 1880, d. 10 Sep 1967
Last Edited23 Jun 2017
     Dorothy Ann Garner was born on 13 April 1907, daughter of John H. Garner and Julia Rainey Turner, in Cisco, Eastland County, Texas.1,2

     She was an intelligent girl, but, sadly, crippled.

     She never married and still lived at 4332 Overhill Drive, Highland Park, Dallas, Texas.2

     Dorothy Ann Garner died of acute septicemia (duration of maybe 3 days) due to acute pneumonitis (duration of maybe 3 days) with contributory causes of childhood polio, birth head injury and myocardial insufficiency on 12 December 1976 at age 69 in Dallas, Dallas County, Texas,2 and was buried on 13 December 1976 in Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas.2,3

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
19103 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas1
192012 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas4
193023 years of age, single and is living in her father's householdHighland Park, Dallas County, Texas5

Citations

  1. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 48, Sheet 22B, dwelling 491, family 498, John H Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  2. [S2608] "Texas Deaths, 1890-1976," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JN41-MBM : accessed 6 Jul 2010), Dorothy Ann Garner, 12 Dec 1976; citing Dallas, Dallas, Texas, United States, reference 90548, State Registrar Office, Austin; FHL microfilm 2,243,985.
  3. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 6 Dec 2016, memorial page for Dorothy Ann Garner (1907-1976) at memorial page... Maintained by Martha McCorkle; citing Sparkman Hillcrest Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  4. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Justice Precinct No. 6 Township, Enumeration District (ED) 118, Sheet 8B, dwelling 158, family 172, J. H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  5. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Dallas County, Texas, population schedule, Highland Park Township, Enumeration District (ED) 57-97, Sheet 61A, dwelling 629, family 629, John H. Garner household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Zelia Blanche McClinton1

F, #271, b. 31 December 1905, d. 12 March 2002
Relationship4th great-granddaughter of Terisha Turner
FatherBenjamin Holmes McClinton2,3 b. 7 Aug 1882, d. 9 Jul 1926
MotherDora Blanche Turner3 b. 20 May 1883, d. 3 Mar 1980

Family

James Tipton Moore b. 29 Dec 1905, d. 14 Jan 1980
Last Edited29 Nov 2018
     Zelia Blanche McClinton was born on 31 December 1905, daughter of Benjamin Holmes McClinton and Dora Blanche Turner, in Gatesville, Coryell County, Texas. This would seem to agree with the 1910 census.4,3 Zelia Blanche McClinton was baptized at Midlothian, Ellis County, Texas, by her grandfather, Stephen W. Turner. She was also known as Dassy B.3 and once as Julia Blanche.5

     Zelia Blanche McClinton and James Tipton Moore obtained a marriage license on 24 May 1930 in Callahan County, Texas.6

     Zelia Blanche McClinton, 24, married James Tipton Moore, 24 on 26 May 1930 in Callahan County, Texas, with Bruce C. Boney, ministor of the First Presbyterian Church officiating.6

     Zelia Blanche McClinton lived at Abilene, Taylor County, Texas.

     Zelia Blanche Moore died on 12 March 2002 at age 96 in Austin, Travis County, Texas, United States,7 and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery, Cisco, Eastland County, Texas, United States.7

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1910as Dassy B. and is 4 years of ageGatesville, Coryell County, Texas3
1920as Julia Blance and 14 years of ageCisco, Eastland County, Texas8
Teacher8
1930as Zelia B. (?), 24 years of age and singleCisco, Eastland County, Texas9
Public School Teacher who lives with her widowed mother9

Citations

  1. [S3741] "Texas, Birth Index, 1903-1997," index citing Ancestry.com, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VDMX-V69 : accessed 14 Sep 2012), Richard William Moore, 19 Apr 1934; from "Texas Birth Index, 1903-1997," database and images, Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com : 2005); citing Texas Department of State Health Services,.
  2. [S1214] Coryell Museum and Historical Center, compiler. Families of Coryell County, Texas (Gatesville: Pediment Publishing, 2004), page 145.
  3. [S71] "1910 United States Federal Census," Coryell County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 33, Sheet 3B, dwelling 54, family 57, B H McClinton household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  4. [S230] Drewa, Vernon, "Email, Vernon Drewa," e-mail message from e-mail address to Toby Turner, dated 16 Sep 1997 containing a report entitled Turner Family, page 15 provides the precise month/date.
  5. [S72] "1920 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Enumeration District (ED) 118, Sheet 20B, dwelling 363, family 425, B. L. McClinton household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  6. [S5502] "Texas, County Marriage Records, 1837-1965," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:K611-CWB : accessed 11 Jun 2017), James T Moore and Zelia Blanche Mcclinton, 26 May 1930, Marriage; citing Callahan, Texas, United States, various county clerk offices, Texas State Library and Archives Commission, Texas Dept. of State Health Services and Golightly-Payne-Coon Co.; FHL microfilm 2,403,928.
  7. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 11 Jun 2017, memorial page for Zelia Blanch McClinton Moore (1905-2002 at memorial page..., photograph of grave by RC Karnes, maintained by RC Karnes; citing Oakwood Cemetery, Cisco, Eastland County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  8. [S72] "1920 U. S. Census," Eastland County, Texas, pop. sch., ED 118, Sheet 20B, dwell. 363, fam. 425, B. L. McClinton household, Roll 1797, page 253B if using name search.
  9. [S2115] "1930 United States Federal Census," Eastland County, Texas, population schedule, Cisco Township, Enumeration District (ED) 67-26, Sheet 32B, dwelling 219, family 244, Dora B. McClinton household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuestOnline, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Edwin N. Swinburne

M, #274, b. 13 September 1813, d. 9 September 1905
E. N. Swinburne

Family

Martha Ann O'Neal b. 15 Dec 1829, d. 18 Dec 1899
Child
Last Edited22 Mar 2020
     
The Problem of Edwin Swinburne's Ancestry
     In the interest of finishing this "site" within a reasonable period of time, I'm not going to exhaustively footnote this section.

     It is my belief that the Swinburnes, a Norman family, came over after the Conquest. They were closely associated with the de Umfraville family. In fact, the Swinburne coat of arms were based on those of the Umfraville family. Robert "with the Beard" Umfraville, Lord of Tour and Vian, came at or shortly after the Conquest with a grant from the Conqueror of the barony of Prudhoe and the valley and forest of Redesdale (properties later associated with the Swinburnes). The Umfravilles were noted for their warlike nature. I suspect, perhaps, the Swinburnes were "poor relations" of the Umfravilles. Nevertheless, they flourished as far as their ability to gain land and serve the king (who, of course, granted them all sorts of favors). The Swinburne men were also tough and martial in that they were charged with guarding the border with Scotland. They were also poets musicians. (Note: despite the many inflated family histories claiming descent from the men at the Battle of Hastings, only fifteen men can be proven to have been there according to contemporaneous sources. Another six are believed to have been there based on reliable documentation. Surely more men fought with William the Conqueror, but we cannot know for certain whom they were.)1] 2

     I've spent a considerable amount of time working on the early Swinburne ancestry. What we know is that in 1165 Pagan de Wircestre held a quarter of a knight's fee in the barony of Radulf de Wirecestre. This holding can clearly be identified with the manor of West Swinburne. Pagan was, in all probability, the brother of Radulf. The land continued to be held by this family when in 1297/8, Edward I gave a charter which confirmed their holdings, adding more land. By 1255, the owner of this land was called John de Swyneburne.

     The surname was taken from a small stream in Northumberland recorded as "Swineburn" in the 1236 Book of Fees and derives from the Olde English pre-7th Century "swin", pig, wild board, with "burn", spring, brook, stream; hence "pig stream." The family can easily be traced, although it is impossible to name all of the descendants due to loss of records. And, as one might expect, there are a few bastards (one of them our ancestor) who carried the surname. Only the main names can be followed and there are a few gaps. When the first Baron was created on 26 Sep 1660, the King's heralds only took the lineage back to Thomas Swinburne of Capheaton, Northumberland, who married Margaret Lawson in 1572 because of the issue of bastardy. Thomas' lineage can be traced back to Alexander de Swyneburne who acquired land in June 1302. I should add that I've studied Pipe Rolls, Inquisitions PostMotem (held by the King's heralds at death to ascertain to whom properties will go [the King always hoped to take the land back], and as many original records as possible. I've also consulted documented genealogies (not including Burke's which is notoriously incorrect in many cases).

     The Swinburnes added to their properties relentlessly. But, there was one significant flaw: the men tended to sire little girls. Therefore, over time, much of the family's wealth went with these heiresses to help found other great English families. A prime example being the Percy family (yes, of Hotspur fame).

     If I were to have to define one characteristic of these family, it would be that of Loyalty. This trait was expressed time after time (a Swinburne carried the flag for Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth field in 1485 and was slain along with his king). But, I've also found musicians, clergy, and attendance at early universities among the various descendants.

     Our line is not directly related to the baronial one of which Algernon Charles Swinburne was a member. Naturally, that is the more-documented line (thanks to the King's heralds). Our line, I believe, descends from Thomas Swinburne of Nafferton (1482-1509), known also as Thomas Swinburne of Edlingham. He was the illegitimate son of Sir William Swynburne of Capheaton who was recognized by his father and given land on 26 Jan 1443 (some genealogists believe this John was Williams's illegitimate brother but being his son seems more likely given the generosity of the land provided him).

     The following is a list of our ancestral line up to the point where I cannot bridge the gap:
          Pagan de Wirecestre of West Swinburn
          William, son of Pagan de Wirecestre
          The link to John below is unproven, but believed by most serious antiquarians (as they were called) to be the case
          John de Wirecestre or de Swyneburn, Lord of West Swinburn in 1257 (he may be the same person as John de Wircester, who held the land in 1240 and probably a descent of Pagan de Wircester who held the land in 1168.
          Sir William De Swyneburn, rector of Fordun, died 1289
          Alexander de Swinburne of Capheaton, born 1260, living 26 May 1309
          Sir William de Swinburn II, born 1285 at Capheaton and died 1354
          Sir William Swinburne IV, born c1327 Capheaton and died before 15 May 1363
          Sir William Swinburne V, of Capheaton, born c1353, died 1402
          Sir William Swinburne VI was living in 1443
          Sir William Swinburne VII, Knight, born c1415 at Capheaton, died after 1443 and before 1463
          John Swinburn, illegitimate son of Sir William VII, Knight, inherited land at Nafferton and was living in 1443 and 1451. It was his third son, Gilbert who was stand bearer to King Richard III and killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485.
          Thomas Swinburne, of Nafferton, born c1465, living 1482 and 1509, purchased Edlingham and Heugh
          John Swinburne of Chopwell in county Durham, born c1504 at Edlingham in Northumberland who received lands in a number of areas including Prudhoe.
          Christopher Swinburne
          John Swinburne of Wylam, under 15 in 1545 died bef 31 Aug 1577
          John Swinburne of Wylam who died 1604
          Thomas Swinburne of Butterby, county Durham, born c1597, petitioned for his estates 8 Dec 1645 and died c1666. He was a devout Royalist at the time of the Civil Wars and author of the famous "Swinburne Letters" in defense of Rome. He declined to join the Protestant Party and" turned his sons out of doors because they did soe." He had eight sons. [Remember: I mentioned the extreme loyalty displayed by this family. Whereas many of the great English families were pragmatic enough to have sons who took each side of a controversy so at least part of the family would survive, the Swinburnes appear not to have followed this strategy here.]
          Nicholas Swinburne, according to most printed sources "died young," but, now iis believed to be the ancestor of a large branch of the family in Warwickshire and Worcestershire. Born c1640 in Butterby, Durham, expelled from family when he converted to Protestantism, he moved to Warwickshire where his mother's family had connections. Most genealogies go with the "died young." But, what are we to make of a man named Nicholas Swinburne, born about 1640, who fathered children in Warwickshire where, heretofore, there had been no one by this surname? The current feeling is that the Nicholas Swinburne in Warwickshire is the same man as the Nicholas Swinburne in county Durham.
          John Swinbourne, born c1666, baptized 6 Nov 1666 at St. Peter's, Bickenhill, Warwickshire, buried 1729
          Thomas Swinbourne, baptized 28 Oct 1691 at St. Peter's Bickenhill, possibly died 1772

From here it gets fuzzy and annoying:
          Henry Swinbourne, baptized 25 Aug 1734 at St. Peter's, Bickenhill who married Mary Stanley 6 Sep 1761 at Holy Trinity, Sutton Coldfield, Warwickshire. She was born c1741. This is the Stanley connection that seems to prove that Chesterfield Stanley was a cousin to Edwin. Henry is a possible ancestor because I've not found the children of his sons: Jeremiah, born 1772; Robert, born 1774; or, Thomas, born 1788 (oddly enough, I have copious information on his daughters' children).

I believe Edwin's grandfather to have been:
          James Swinbourne, baptized 13 Dec 1729 at St. Peter's, Bickenhill who married Jemima Shipley 24 Jan 1750. She was born c1730. They were the parents of two sons: John, baptized 19 Sep 1754 at St. Peter's; and James, baptized 2 Jun 1762 at St. Giles, Sheldon, Warwickshire and buried 8 Jan 1814 at St. Alphege, Solihull, Warwickshire. Keep in mind that Edwin named two children, his first son,James, and his first daughter, Jemima.

     Despite hours of pouring over parish registers, census, etc. records,in all the areas of Warwickshire and Worcestershire in which the surname is found, I have not found information on these two boys, one of whom is, in all probability, Edwin's father. I have a complete genealogy except for one critical gap which, so far, I've been utterly unable to fill. I've been working with a woman in England on this family and am indebted for her help with the Swinburnes of Warwickshire and Worcestershire.
     Edwin N. Swinburne was born on 13 September 1813 in Worcestershire, England. He reported his date of birth as September, 1813 in the 1900 census. The 1850 census indicates a birth year of c1815. Edwin reports he was born in 1813 and his death certificate uses the same date.3 In his letter to the editor of the Mexia Evening News in 1899, Edwin mentions his birth date for the first time. He states his place of birth in his journal, but no birth or baptismal record for him has been located in Worcestershire OR Warwickshire at this time.4,5

     On Edwin's death certificate, filled out by his son, Sidney, his name is listed as Edmund, and his place of birth is listed as London, England. Sidney filed a delayed death report which may be incorrect because he made other mistakes in family information.6

     So far, I have not found his naturalization papers which might contain birth information. The naturalization and citizenship list for White County, Illinois from 1860-1898 is too late to cover Edwin.

     In 1834, he emigrated to the United States.7 According to his journal, he left England and arrived in New York City in October.8 This would mean he left England in late August or September, given that his journal says it took about 70 days for his ship to travel across the Atlantic. Unfortunately, I cannot find him on any extant passenger list for the period 1832-1835.

     Edwin, 31, married Martha Ann O'Neal, 14, on 12 November 1844 at White County, Illinois. He is listed on the form as Edwin N. Swinburn and she, as Martha Ann ONeil.9,10

     In 1854, he moved to Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas. However, none of his children are shown in the 1854 School Census.7,11 Edwin N. Swinburne was on the School Census in 1857 at Nacogdoches.7

     Edwin N. Swinburne began military service on 1 February 1862 by enlisting as a Private in Company A, 17 Reg't Texas Cavalry in Nacogdoches. He was enrolled by T. J. Johnson for a period of one year. He was discharged 23 May 1862 since which time he has substituted for J. A. Fulgham.

     The Company Muster-In Roll states that Edwin N. Swinburn, age 47 years, enlisted as a Private in Capt. Sebron M. Noble's Company, 17 Regiment Texas Cavalry on a Muster Roll dated Camp Likens, March 2, 1862 with the muster-in date listed as March 15, 1862. It shows he joined for duty and enrolled on February 1, 1862 in Nacogdoches for a period of 12 months. The number of miles to the rendezvous point was 70 and the valuation of his horse was $225 and equipments as $25. Both were signed by J. N.(illegible and I'm guessing at an N) Norris.

     On July 27, 1966, someone wrote an order for a photocopy concerning a veteran receipt no. 21814, searcher Bel for Edwin N. Swinburn. The following is a true copy:
               I CERTIFY, That the within named Edwin M. Swinburn a private of Captain S. M. Noble Company of the 17th Regiment of Texas Cavalry, born in Worcestershire England, aged 45 years, 5 feet, 6 inches high, light complexion, blue eyes, light hair and by occupation Brick Mason was enlisted by Capt. Thomas J. Johnson Nacogdoches Texas on the 1st day of February 1862 to serve one year, and is now entitled to discharge by reason of the conscript (guessing) (illegible) he being over 35 years of age
               The said Edwin N. Swinburn was last paid by Capt. J. Fields (to) include the 24th day of May 1862.
               There is due to him forty two Dollars traveling allowance (illegible) Little Rock, the place of discharge, to Nacogdoches Tex the place of enrollment, transportation not being furnished in kind.
               This is due him (line blank)
               He is indebted to the Confederate States (line blank) Dollars on account of (line blank)
               Given in duplicate at Little Rock, this 24th day of May 1862.
                                             S. M. Noble

     For pay from (all of this is crossed out by an X)
     For pay for traveling from Little Rock Ark to Nacogdoches Texas being 350 miles, at ten cents per mile, 40 cts for (illegible) and 20 miles /on horse

          Deduct for clothing overdrawn, (line black)
Balance paid $42.00
               Received of Capt. Julian (illegible) C. S. Army this 10th day of August 1862, Forty Two dollars and (illegible symbol) Cents in full of the above account.
          (Signed Duplicate)                              Edwin N. Swinburn
          Witness                              S. M. Noble, Maj.12 He served after 2 February 1862 in the in Company A, Capt. Arnold's Company, Texas 17th Cavalry, Company A, as an Infantry Rifleman. He's also listed in the 17th Consolidated Texas Dismounted Cavalry.13,14

     On 10 August 1862, Voucher No. 170
          Paid [this date]
          Pvt.
          E. N. Swinburn
          Co. A, 17th Regt. Cav
          Pay mileage $42.00.12

     Dallas News Athens, Texas, Jan. 16 --
     Your correspondent learned incidentally that Rev. E. W. H. Parker, a Baptist minister now living in Athens, was the color-bearer of a Texas regiment during the Civil War and that he had still in his possession the flag which he then carried. I asked the privilege of seeing and inspecting the flag which was kindly granted, and this blood-stained, battle-marked memento of that great fratricidal strife is now in my possession temporarily. It is tattered and torn, but shows superior handy work and this it was made of the finest material. Thirteen stars are set in two blue bars which cross at right angles on a red or pink square as background at top (part of the page is missing) The rest of the flat is white or cream silk. Its is about seven feet long. It has bullet holes in it and has blood stains on it which were splattered on it when six men were killed near it by an exploding shell.

     Mr. Parker was asked its history, whereupon he handed me the following sketch:
          The 17th Texas Volunteer Cavalry, Confederate Army was organized early in 1862 and ordered to Corinth, Mississippi. In the meantime a Federal army was invading Arkansas from Missouri. Our orders were changed to meet it. We met the advance of said army and turned it back. By the middle of July 1862 our horses were run down and we were dismounted the 16th of July. Our first hard-fought battle was on the 11th day of January 1863, beginning on the 10th. In this battle we were surrendered, nine Texas regiments in all surrendering at the same time. Enough of us escaped after the surrender to make eight companies. In the early part of spring we reorganized with the title of "The 17th Texas Consolidated Regiment," James R. Taylor was made colonel. We lost our flag in the engagement of Jan. 11, 1863 (Arkansas Post) and this flag was made and presented to our regiment by a Miss Watson, two miles west of Shreveport in July 6, 1863. Its first engagement was Vidalia, Louisiana, in February 1865 [I think this is a typo and it should read 1864]. The next at Harrisburg, Louisiana, in the same month. The next Mansfield, Louisiana, April 8, 1864. The next Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, April 9, 1864. Next Marksville, Louisiana, May 16, 1864; next Yellow Bayou, Louisiana, May 18, 1864, which was our last regular engagement. The undersigned received the flag from the hands of Miss Watson and was Regimental Ensign to the close of the war.
                    E. W. H. Parker.15

     At some point after he was enumerated, he moved his family to Mexia in Limestone County.

     On 13 September 1899, in the issue of the Mexia Evening News, E. N. Swinburn writes:
           "This the 13th day of September, I reach my 86th mile stone of human mortal life. My tottering steps plainly tell me that I am reaching the edge of the mystic river - the great divide between mortal and immortal life. How soon the 'boatman pale' may dip his oar in its crystal waters to transfer my enfranchised spirit to the immortal shores of life I cannot tell, but I have an abiding faith in the goodness of one All-Wise Father that I shall in safety reach the evergreen shores of the land of souls; that I shall be welcomed home by my loving children and many dear relatives that have already 'gone before.' One dear little babe whose last smile is photographed on memory's tablets, I shall see again.

           I may truly say I am rising towards the sky; the sunshine is over my head. Heaven lights me with the reflection of its radiant glories. The nearer I approach the end the plainer I hear around me the immortal symphonies of the Heavenly chimes.

           My labor on earth must be nearly done, but only to renew it again in more exalted conditions.
               For ever and ever,
                              E. N. Swinburn.16"

     On 11 October 1899, "E. N. Swinburn returned on the noon train from Dallas, where he has been visiting relatives and attending the fair."17

     After 18 December 1899, E. N. Swinburn wrote to the Editor of the Mexia Evening News:
           "Please allow me through your columns to express my most sincere heart felt thanks to my neighbors and many friends for their many tokens of sympathy and help rendered during my good wife's illness and death. My loss is irreparable. After more than half a century of united life we are riven asunder by the remorseless hand of death. Am I 'smitten of God?' If there is a time to weep, my time is now, and I find solace in tears. I try to cultivate the spirutual (sic), but in the crisis of death the patent powers of nature will dominate our poor humanity. My loss is not all, so far as her influence extended, she was only known for her goodness of heart. The sick and afflicted always received her sympathies and help. She was always ready to offer herself whereever (sic) human suffering needed her.

           Generosity was only bounded by her ability to give and do. While human afflictions are but for a time, the pleasures of eternal life will last forever. Human suffering will cease, clothed in garments of celestial splendor, to live and love forever.18"

     On 13 September 1901, the following letter was published in the Mexia Evening News:
          Yesterday afternoon we received a pleasant visit from Mr. E. N. Swinburn, who left with us the following greeting on the occasion of his 88th birthday:
               "Mr. Editor - This day 88 years ago I was ushered into mortal life. Generations have come and gone since that day, yet I am still on shoals of time, with a modiume (sic) of vitality left that may possibly reach into the future a few 'more rising suns' in the 'world beautiful.' With a demonstrated immortal city before me I remain serene with a confidence that I shall finally reach that better land where I will again be with those that are the occupants of my daily thoughts. With solicitation to you, Mr. Editor, I am your neighbor and friend,
                         E. N. Swinburn"

          This is (sic) old gentleman, is yet hale and hearty in appearance and could easily pass for a man of 60 or 65. He was in the Confederate army nearly, and during the closing days of the struggle had many exciting experiences as a blockade runner on the Mississippi river.
          We enjoyed Mr. Swinburn's visit and hope that he may live to celebrate many more birthday anniversaries."19

     On 30 July 1902, E. N. Swinburne filed a pension application in Dallas County where he had lived for twelve months at Dallas, Dallas County, Texas. In his application, he stated that he had never filed for a pension under the Confederate Pension Law. He gave his occupation as Brickmason (sic) and described his physical condition as old and feeble. He stated that he enlisted in Company "A", 17th Texas Calvary and served for about two years [at variance with the above documents]. He stated that he owned 8 acres of land in Limestone County, Texas worth about $10 per acre and owned no personal property, nor had he conveyed or sold any within the prior two years. He stated he had no income, was in indigent circumstances and was unable to labor to earn his support. He furthermore stated that he had never deserted the Confederacy and had been a bona fide resident citizen of Texas continuously since the first day of January, 1880.

     To support his application, there is an affidavit dated February 23, 1903, from his physician, J. T. Wells, M.D., who stated that he had the following disabilities, "Bright's Disease and infirmities incident to old age" which rendered him unable to labor at any work or calling sufficient to earn his support.

     In further support of his application, two additional depositions were included in his request. They were from J. T. Swinburn of Sutton County, dated January 12, 1903, and A. C. Swinburne of Wilbarger County, Texas, dated August 4, 1902. In these depositions, each was asked 6 direct interrogatories which included questions as to their names, ages, present residence, knowledge of applicant and his enlistment in the Confederacy, his company and regiment and his inability to support himself. In addition, there were 4 cross interrogatories requiring answers which were designed to ascertain that the applicant was indeed the person who had served in the Confederate Army or Navy, that the person answering was positively certain that the applicant is the identical person serving as testified, answers not conjecture and, finally, that no desertion had occurred.

     In his deposition, J. T. Swinburn states that E. N. served from 1861 until the end of the war. His handwriting is very difficult to read, but he answers the 6 questions. In A. C. Swinburne's deposition, he states also that E. N served until the end of the war.

     [At no point did anyone indicate that he had served in the navy or with another unit. I had hoped to find confirmation that he had been a blockade runner or had joined another unit.]20,21

     On 19 August 1903, his application for a pension as a Confederate War veteran was approved.21

     On 13 September 1903, a final letter entitled Some Reminiscences was published in the Mexia Evening News:
               "My Good Old Friend, Major N. P. Houx." - I want to say to you that this day ninety years ago I became an inhabitant of mortal life. Through the period of infant life I was tenderly cared for by a loving mother. In time I became a stalwart lad of the street. In early manhood I commenced reading the 'American newspapers' and soon became enthused with a love to see this wonderful country. Before I attained my majority I found myself on the 'bounding billows (?) of the Atlantic ocean, bound for the land of the 'sunset.'

               One incident I will mention: as we were leaving the port two Irish girls and their friends came aboard and there was much weeping at parting. The first thing I knew tears were streaming down my cheeks, so intense was my feeling at the prospect before me that I thought but little of the past. Every Britton loves his country 'whose flag has braved a thousand years the battle and the breeze.'

               I bid adieu to the light little isle, the land of my birth. After seven weeks voyage on the trackless ocean I reached the land of promise. I walked the streets of New York City for three days. On the night of the third day I found what I had been looking for - employment as an ornamental worker in pearl. After remaining there two or three months I committed myself to the bottom (?) of 'Old Ocean.' I reached (?) the only (?) of the South -- New Orleans -- in a thunder storm. There I first saw forked lightning and men dressed in blankets for overcoats. After a stay of several days, I again embarked, this time on a steamboat, to go up the Arkansas River to the head of navigation, which was Fort Gibson, on the Neoaho river, for I wanted to see the 'Red Man' in his 'native wilds.' which I did see them to some extent. I saw one chief whose name was 'Tabba Quoeona (?), perhaps the most noble specimen of physical life I ever saw. His weight must have been nearly three hundred pounds tall and straight as an Indian. To his hair in the back he had attached a buffalo hide, some ten feet long, which was dragging the ground.

               Things soon became monotonous to me and I resolved to soon return again to the States. Two others with myself resolved to go through and strike the Missouri State line. Thus I left the Indian Territory, going through a part of Kansas. I at last came in sight of white people, feeling that I had again reached 'God's Country.' As soon as we found the waters running to the Missouri river we purchased a canoe made out of a walnut tree. This canoe measured twenty-five feet long, ten inches deep and sixteen inches wide. With that frail craft we floated down creeks, pulled over mill dams, and finally reached the turbid waters of the Missouri river, out of which we floated into the 'Great Mississippi River' down to Cairo, thus ending a voyage in that dug-out of about a thousand miles.

               Many months after landing at Cairo I found myself in a valley of the 'Wabash.' There I first saw the lovely maiden - her beauty made me glad. Afterwards she became my bride and the mother of my children. Remaining in that country for several years we finally decided to move to the 'Empire State' of Texas. The civil war (unreadable) I entered the military service of my country and taking my oldest son with me we went through perilous scenes out of number. Escaping the shot and shell of the enemy we finally returned once more to civil life.

               Four years ago the cruelest calamity of my life befell me in the loss of my beloved wife. She with four of her children are in the angel world, and four remain to me in earth life who may reasonably expect many years of mortal life, but as for me

                         A few more setting suns at most,
                              Sing glory, glory, glory,
                         And I shall see my loved and lost
                              In glory, glory, glory.
               Adieu, Mr. Editor, for the present
                              E. N. Swinburne"22.
     [Note: E. P. Houx was also the editor of the Mexia News - a newspaper which often changed its name.]

Edwin N. Swinburne left a will dated in August 1905 at Limestone County, Texas.

The Will of E. N. Swinburn

"State of Texas
Freestone County
     In the name of God Amen. I E. N. Swinburn, a citizen of Limestone county State of Texas temporarily visiting in Freestone county - being of Lawful age and of sound and (unreadable, but perhaps depasing) mind though feeble in body and feeling that my time of life must soon close on earth, Do make and publish this my Last will and Testament.

     First after my death I direct that my body be interred by the graves of my deceased wife and son in the cemetery at Mexia Texas. and while I wish to be buried decently let no ostentacious (sic) ceremonies or display be used.

     Secondly. After my funeral expenses and payment of my board bills if any, I give and bequeath to my beloved Granddaughter Viz. Annie Carey Murray wife of John Murray all my property consisting of my house and lot in the Southern part of Mexia which house and lot was purchased from J. W. F(?)ickers. I thus make Annie my sole Legat(?ubranse). She has had charge of me and cared for me for several years while I on account of my blindness and other infirmities of age being nearly ninety two could not care for myself and I being unable to renumerate (sic) her and her husband for the great sacrifice made by them for my comfort while in my wholly helpless condition. I do give her all that I have of earthly goods and possessions as above mentioned, And ask my several children and grandchildren who may have a legal claim to the said House & Lot waive their right to the same in favor of Annie Carey Murray daughter of my daughter Mary deceased; Those of whom I ask this waiver are Alva C Andrew M. John T. & Sidney J. my sons, and Chas and Lena children of my son E. O. Swinburn deceased and Ernest Pierce my grand-son, This discrimination is not made as a mark of my displeasure or desire on my part to be partial but to do justice. I earnestly desire that settlement of my affair be made without the aid of the court.

     I hereby appoint John F. Murray my executor to act without giving bond in the execution of this my Last will & testament.
                     E. N. Swinburne
     Witness
     M. H. Harris
     G. B. Everett
     H. M. Myers."23,24,25

     Edwin N. Swinburne died on 9 September 1905 at age 91 in Bonner, Freestone County, Texas,26,27 and was buried in Mexia City Cemetery, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas.
     "Last Saturday afternoon Grandpa E. N. Swinburn breathed his last at the home of Mr. Murray in Woodland, where he had been sick for several weeks. He was buried at the Mexia cemetery Saturday afternoon, the funeral occurring from the home of his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ed Swinburn. Rev. Harrison of Wortham officiated at the grave and made an appropriate talk in which he told of the recent conversion of deceased and his joining the church during a revival at Woodland.

     Mr. Swinburn was a man well-preserved for his age and until recently was able to get about fairly well.

     Had he lived until the 13th of this month he would have been 93 years old. He was born in England but came to this country when quite a young man and has lived in this section for many years and raised a family of children who all married and raised families.
The writer knew Mr. Swinburn to be a good conscientious-man (sic), honest and sincere in his convictions, and one whom to know was to love and respect.

     He was a good upright citizen and there are many who will mourn his demise. His life was full of years of usefulness and may his soul rest in peace in that land where trouble and sorrow cannot enter. Peace to his ashes."
     Although the obituary was unsigned, I believe it was written by the editor of the newspaper, Major E. P. Houx.28

     A briefer obituary, with a picture, ran in the Dallas Morning News on 22 Sep 1905:
          "E. N. Swinburn died at Woodland, near this city [Mexia], Saturday, Sept. 9 and was buried here this afternoon. Deceased was 93 years old and came to this county from England when a young man. He had lived in this section for many years and leaves a large number of descendants. His wife preceded him to the other world several years ago, since which time he has been living with relatives. He was a well preserved man and up to a few months ago was active as most men of 60."

     Google Maps does not show Bonner as existing, but it is just outside Fairfield.

     To find E.N.'s, Martha Ann's, Mary E. and Tom Carey's, Edwin O.'s and Ruby Carey Swinburn's burial sites at the Mexia Cemetery: as you enter the town on Highway 84 heading south, turn west on North Kaufman Street which runs directly into the cemetery, take the entrance road until you reach the second road to the left (south) for about 220 feet, the graves are located about 60 feet west (almost in the center) behind a large oak tree.29,4,30

(To read his shorter obituary which ran in the Dallas Morning News, click Edwin N. Swinburn Obituary)

     His estate was probated on 27 November 1905 in Limestone County, Texas. Application was duly made to the Hon. James Kimbill, Judge, in Application No. 1214 in which the probable value of the estate was estimated to be $1,000 (worth $25,161.54 in 2012 dollars).

The State of Texas            Estate of E. N. Swinburn deceased
County of Limestone            Proof of Last Will and Testament of
E. N. Swinburn Deceased
          This day personally appeared in open court G. B. Everett who, being duly sworn as a witness in the above untitled matter, and examined on behalf of the applicant to prove said Will, says: I was well acquainted with E. N. Swinburn deceased, during his Life Time; I knew the above decedent for about 25 or 30 years before his death; the signature of The said deceased to the instrument (unreadable) shown to me and offered for probate as his Last Will and Testament, filed in this court on the 21 day of October A. D. 1895 (sic) and bearing date on the (blank) day of (blank) A. D. 1905 was made by the deceased on said Last named date at Bonner, Texas, in presence of my self, G. B. Everett, M. H. Harris and H. M. Harris, the other subscribing witness; all of said witnesses being over the age of fourteen years. At the time of making of said Will the testator was of sound and disposing mind and memory, and he declared the said Will so made by him to be his Last Will and Testament, and I thereupon signed my name as a witness to-gether with M. H. Harris and H. M. Harris at the request of the said testator in his presence and in the presence of each other. The said deceased at the time of the execution of said instrument was ninety two years of age; the said E. N. Swinburn departed this Life on the 9 day of Sept A. D. 19-5 about one month after making said Will in the county of Freestone in the State of Texas. Their residence and principal estate was situated in Limestone Co Tex
                                                   G. B. Everett
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 27th day of Nov. A. D. 1905 in open court.
                                             Alf Mills Clerk to
                                             County Court Limestone (unreadable)
By S. H. Wright Deputy.31

(The early 19th century Journal of Edwin N. Swinburn is a fascinating document. To read a copy of the typescript of his journal, click The Journal of Edwin Swinburn)

     The narrative ends abruptly. One can only wonder why he never even finished his last sentence because he lived till 1905, some 40 years after the Civil War ended. It would've been helpful to know exactly in which unit he served during the last years of the war. In several places the journal didn't make sense due, I suspect, to difficulty in reading the handwritten original by the typist who transcribed it. The copy sent me was too dim from which to make photo copies.32

     The Research Center also has copies of both E.N.'s and Alva C.'s enlistment and muster out documents from the Civil War, as well as copies of several letters to the editor of the Mexia Evening News. The journal transcription is dated February 21, 1967 with the name John Swinburne on the top, probably for whom it was made. The copy was presented to the East Texas Research Center by Martha T. Webb of Teague, then a student at Stephen F. Austin.

Tax Rolls

DatePropertyLocation
1857Nacogdoches County, Texas7
1861Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas33
1862Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas7
1890although he was living in Mexia by then. He must have retained some property in Nacogdoches CountyNacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas7

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1840unable to find him on either FamilySearch or Ancestry.com as of 23 Sep 2019
185034 years old and born in England with a household consisting of his wife and two childrenLynn Township, Posey County, Indiana34
Brickmaker34
186044 years old with a household consisting of his wife and four childrenNacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas35
Brick Mason, with real estate valued at $800 (worth $20,147.95 in 2012 dollars) and personal property valued at $700 (worth $17,629.46 in 2012 dollars).36,37
187053 and living with his wife and seven of their children: John T., James, Andrew, Josephine, Mary, Sidney, and Edward (sic). The form shows that he cannot read and read which we know to be untrue. I believe the enumerator mistakenly filled out the entire sheet which shows nearly everybody, with the exception of small children, unable to read and writeNacogdoches PO, Nacogdoches County, Texas38
Brickmason38
188067 years of age. His daughter, Mary E., and her baby are living with him, as are five boardersMexia, Limestone County, Texas39
Brick Mason39
1890as reconstructed from the 1890 Tax ListLimestone County, Texas40
190086 years of age. He is living with his grandson Earnest (age 16), granddaughter Anna M. Carey (age 20) and granddaughter Josephine (age 16)Mexia, Limestone County, Texas41

Citations

  1. [S3719] "Companions of William the Conqueror", contributed by Wikipedia, online at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Companions_of_William_the_Conqueror , accessed 15 Feb 2014, website address verified 13 Jul 2019. This article is well-documented.
  2. [S1242] Camp, Anthony J.. My Ancestors Came With The Conqueror: Those Who Did, and Some of Those Who Probably Did not (Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Company, 1990).
  3. [S213] E. N. Swinburn entry, Death Certificate of E. N. Swinburne, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas.
  4. [S878] E. N. Swinburne tombstone. Toby Turner, photographer, 3 Jul 1999, Mexia Cemetery, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas.
  5. [S1802] Letters to Editor, Mexia Evening News, Mexia, Texas, letter dated 13 Sep 1899; a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University., Microfilm borrowed from newspaper and viewed in Mexia Library 19 Oct 2000.
  6. [S213] Death Cert., E. N. Swinburn, 19 Dec 2012 still unavailable on FamilySearch or Footnote.
  7. [S280] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves. Nacogdoches--Gateway to Texas : a biographical directory, II (Fort Worth: Arrow/Curtis Print. Co., 1974), page 391.
  8. [S1804] Journal of E. N. Swinburne, hand-written original, n.d., Edwin Swinburn Collection, 1862-1908, A-176, East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, Nacogdoches, Nacogdoches County, Texas.
  9. [S410] Vaught, Harriet B.. Marriages from White County, Illinois (Carmi, Illinois: H. B. Vaught, 1950), page 40.
  10. [S1023] "Illinois Statewide Marriage Index, 1763-1900", contributed by Office of the Secretary of State of Illinois, online at https://www.ilsos.gov/isavital/marriagesrch.jsp , website address verified 2 Jul 2019, Volume 002.
  11. [S1390] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, compiler. 1854 school census of Nacogdoches County (s.l.: s.n., bet 1980-1996).
  12. [S1428] E. N. Swinburn, Compiled Service Records of Confederate Soldiers Who Served in Organizations from Texas, 17th (Consolidatetd) Dismounted Cavalry - E. N. Swinburn (n.p.: n.pub.), Record Group unknown record group , Roll Microcropy - 323, Roll #96; digitized and made available by unknown agency, unknown url.
  13. [S578] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, The People of Nacogdoches County in the Civil War, 1980), page 260.
  14. [S322] Freestone County Historical Commission. History of Freestone County, Texas (n.a.: Freestone County Historical Commission, 1978), page 599.
  15. [S1806] "17th Texas Cavalry Flag," Athens Weekly, transcribed by Freeman, Bunny Shumate on 8 Feb 2002, www.rootsweb.com/~txhender/Military/CivilWar/colorbearer.htm, 3 Feb 1903 the original site is no longer accessible as of 1 Feb 2014, but can now be found at https://www.tsl.texas.gov/treasures/flagsandmaps/flags/historic-flags.html and https://www.tsl.texas.gov/exhibits/flags/4038Granbury.htm
  16. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, letter dated 13 Sep 1899; a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University.
  17. [S6039] "Newspapers.com," index and images, Ancestry.com, (Provo, Utah) accessed 22 Mar 2020, entry for E. N. Swinburn, 1899, Mexia Evening Ledger (Mexia, Texas), issue of 11 Oct 1899.
  18. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University.
  19. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, letter dated 13 Sep 1901; a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University.
  20. [S796] E. N. Swinburne file; Controller's File No 09823 (Austin, Texas: Texas State Archives).
  21. [S5897] "Alabama, Texas and Virginia, Confederate Pensions, 1884-1958," index and images, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., (Provo, Utah) accessed 5 Jul 2019, entry for E. N. Swinburne, Dallas County, #9823, images 389-404 of 479.
  22. [S1802] E. N. Swinburn Letters, Mexia Evening News, letter dated 13 Sep 1903, a copy of the letter is also contained in the Edwin Swinburn Collection at the East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, as well as the original, as seen in the microfilmed copy, is very poor and could not be copied so I transcribed it by hand.
  23. [S657] Swinburn, E. N., Will of E. N. Swinburn, Book L, Case No. 1214, pages 431-434 N75, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas, although this will is apparently undated, it appears to have been made about one month before his death. A copy of the will, postings, and proof are in the possession of Toby Turner.
  24. [S794] E. N. Swinburne will (undated), Limestone County Will Book L L, Limestone County, Texas Court House, Groesbeck, Limestone County, Texas.
  25. [S5896] "Texas, Wills and Probate Records, 1833-1974," index and images, Ancestry.com Operations Inc., (Provo, Utah) accessed 5 Jul 2019, entry for E N Swinburn, Limestone, Probate Minutes, Vol K-L, 1901-1906, image 576-577 of 689. Original data: Texas County, District and Probate Courts.
  26. [S1948] "E.N.SWINBURN," Dallas Morning News, Texas, 22 Sep 1905, page 6, E.N. Swinburn.
  27. [S213] Death Cert., E. N. Swinburn, 19 Dec 2012; still unavailable on FamilySearch as of 20 Jun 2017. Only one death certificate can be found by browsing (Pauline Estill Block) for the period of 1903-1909 for Limestone County.
  28. [S795] Obituary of E. N. Swinburne, The State Herald, 14 Sep 1905, Microfilm Volume 6 - January 1904 - December 1905.
  29. [S367] Virginia J. Bounds and Imogene C. Barham. Limestone County, Texas Cemetery Surveys, I, Part 2 (Groesbeck, Texas: Limestone County History Museum, 1988).
  30. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 22 Aug 2011, memorial page for Edwin N. Swinburne (1813-1905) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by Toby, maintained by Toby; citing Mexia City Cemetery, Mexia, Limestone County, Texas. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  31. [S657] Will of E.N. Swinburn, Book L, Case No. 1214, pages 431-434 N75.
  32. [S1804] Journal of E. N. Swinburne, hand-written original, n.d. East Texas Research Center at Stephen F. Austin University, copy of the original is in the possession of Toby Turner.
  33. [S280] Ericson, Nacogdoches - Gateway to TX, page 341.
  34. [S961] "1850 United States Federal Census," Posey County, Indiana, population schedule, Lynn Township, dwelling 790, family 790, Edwin Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  35. [S68] "1860 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, Nacogdoches, Beat No. 1 A Township, dwelling 60, family 60, E N Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  36. [S576] Ericson, Carolyn Reeves, editor, The People of Nacogdoches County in 1860 - An Edited Census, 1978), page 7.
  37. [S68] "1860 U. S. Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, pop. sch., Beat No. 1 A Township, dwell. 60, fam. 60, E N Swinburn household, Roll 1301, page 120B,.
  38. [S672] "1870 United States Federal Census," Nacogdoches County, Texas, population schedule, 1st District Township, dwelling 115, family 115, Edward N Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  39. [S677] "1880 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Mexia Township, Enumeration District (ED) 917, Sheet 11, dwelling 122, family 124, Edwin N Swinburn household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  40. [S69] Moody, Mary C., compiler. 1890 Limestone County, Texas Census (Arlington: Blackstone Publishing Company, 1988).
  41. [S70] "1900 United States Federal Census," Limestone County, Texas, population schedule, Precinct No 4, Mexia Town Township, Enumeration District (ED) 59, Sheet 14, dwelling 267, family 269, Edwin N Swinburne household, digital images. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.