William Petty

M, #13008, b. 1730, d. before 27 May 1805

Family 1

Lettice (--?--)

Family 2

Child
Last Edited7 Aug 2019
     William Petty was born in 1730 in Spotsylvania County, Virginia Colony.1

     William married Lettice (--?--) circa 1754 at Culpeper County, Virginia Colony.2,3,4

     On 1 August 1770, William Crews and Joseph Crew of Cornwall Parish Charlotte County conveyed to William Petty of same for £28, 200 acres in Charlotte on the branches of Wallace Creek. Said land, bounded by Morton's line, was purchased from John Crisp by William and Joseph Crews by two deeds recorded in Lunenburg County. All houses, out houses, buildings, woods, etc. Signed William Crews and Joseph Crews. Witnesses: none
Right of dower relinquished by Ruth, wife of William Crews, and, Sarah, wife of Joseph Crews.
Recorded 6 Aug 1770 at Charlotte County, Virginia Colony.5

     On 1 January 1772, William purchased 150 acres of land on both sides of Double Creek at Pittsylvania County, Virginia Colony.6

     By 1773, he was a resident of Pittsylvania County, Virginia Colony, where he conveyed the land he received from William and Joseph Crew. "His wife, Lettie, relinquished her dower right and in so doing forged one of the strongest links between the William Petty of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, in 1773 and the William Petty whose will was probated in Clarke County, Kentucky, on 27 May 1805, naming among others his widow, Lettis."6

     On 8 September 1773, William Petty, of Pittylsvania County, conveyed to Robert Williams, of the same county, for £40, all that tract of about 152 acres of land in the county on the branches of Wallace Creek, bounded by Morton, being that piece of land purchased of William and Joseph Crews. Signed by William Petty. Witnesses: Francis M. Petty, John Mading, James Farmer, Elizabeth (her mark) Petty, Joseph Pettey, Joseph Cole, Joel Watkins, William Morton, L. Joe Morto. Lettice, the wife of the said Petty, relinquished her right of dower. Recorded 5 Oct 1773 at Charlotte County, Virginia Colony.4

     In 1777, his name is found on Charles Kennon's List of signers of the Oath of Allegiance to the Colony of Virginia at Pittsylvania County, Virginia.7

     On 17 August 1778, he was still a resident of Pittsylvania County when he sold the land on both sides of Double Creek in two separate tracts in Pittsylvania County, Virginia.6

     On 3 April 1780, William received a grant of 400 acres on Hunting Creek on both sides of the road leading from Shallow Ford to Mulberry Fields, the present Wilkesboro. This was not the first land acquired by him in Surry County, North Carolina.8

     In 1783, Rev. William Petty was first recorded in North Carolina Baptist minutes in the organization of Petty's Meeting House which later took the name of Flat Rock Baptist Church from nearby Flat Rock Creek. This was in the vicinity of what is now Hamptonville in Yadkin County, North Carolina, but the area was a part of Surry County until 1850.

     Elder William Petty is shown as the pastor of Flat Rock Church (a Primitive Baptist Church) constituted in 1783. He said to have gone through Iredell and Wilkes County preaching the gospel.9

     In 1786, Rev. William Petty led the church of which he was pastor, then called Petty's Meeting House, but later Flat Rock, to invite other church west of the Yadkin in North Carolina, and some just across the line in Virginia, belonging to the Strawberry Association, to send delegates to his church, about two miles west of Brooks' Cross Road in order to form an independent association. This appears to have originated with Petty whose church was known as Petty's Meeting House, later called Hunting Creek, but since 1802, Flat Rock.

     "All records both of his own church and of the Yadkin Association show that he was an able and progressive leader. In these years he was traveling far and wide, going as far as the church known as Head of the Yadkin near the present town of Patterson in Caldwell County, on matters concerning the churches, and had already begun those missionary labors that resulted in the organization of the Grassy Knob Baptist Church in northern Iredell and a half dozen other churches in that section. He was not only enterprising and aggressive, but he had the wisdom to see that in the churches of his section and time, among whose members there were few or none who had books or periodicals or other printed matter, there was need of meetings which could be generally attended, in order that the members of these churches might hear discussions of religious principles and doctrines especially those of the Baptists, and of all other things that concern the life and conduct of Baptist churches."

     "For two meetings, October, 1786 and June, 1788, the Association convened at Petty's Meeting House." . . . The first independent meeting of the Yadkin Association was held Aug 28, 29, and 30, 1790.

     Rev. William Petty was moderator between the years 1787-1795, with the exception of 1791, when another pastor of his church took over. Petty voluntarily gave up his office.10

     In September 1787, "the Flat Rock Church entered into an agreement to furnish their pastor, Elder William Petty, 'a great-coat and other necessary clothing,' and had raised and paid the money by the December meeting."11

     In November 1789, "the church, 'unanimously agreed that each male member should contribute something toward paying Brother Petty's Tax.11'"

     In 1790, "Rev. William Petty's church, Flat Rock, about thirty miles to the west [of Timber Ridge Church], constituted in 1783, according to Asplund, already in [this year] had 203 members."

     "By the time the Cub Creek Church in Wilkes County was formed as a separate church from Flat Rock on 17 May 1794, Petty and Cook had been preaching and baptizing in that region for some time before."

     "Another church which was a part of the development instituted by William Petty at Flat Rock was that of Island Ford, which is located in Yadkin County three miles east of Jonesville."12

     On 12 November 1791, Elder William Petty became extremely angry because "a young male member of his church, Flat Rock, took away his daughter. On that occasion, according to a minute, at an occasional meeting called by Elder Petty for the purpose of considering it, 'the matter concerning Richard Stevens' conduct in taking away Brother Petty's daughter under age without consent, was fully illustrated, and Brother Petty fully rehearsed his grief and trial, and also confesssed his fault in being exasperated and speaking many harsh words, &c., from which the Church then agreed to look over his conduct, and charged John Stevens with being privy to his Brother's conduct and not informing Brother Petty, from when it was laid over to the next meeting.' At the next meeting, a week later, Brother John Stevens confessed that he could not see himself in error in not telling Brother Petty about his brother's designs to steal his daughter, but had had no desire to 'hang on' the church, and was excluded. His Brother Richard spoke for himself and said 'that if the matter now in dispute was yet to be done, he would still persist in doing it, and on the Church receiving no acknowledgment wherein he saw he had committed a trespass against Brother Petty, they thought fit to exclude him also."13

     On 14 January 1792, he is described in a deed as William Petty, "of Surry County, when he sold 300 acres of land on Deep Creek to Christian Fender. He evidently moved sometime after this date to Wilkes County because a deed dated 5 Apr 1794, describes him as William Petty, "of the County of Wilkes," when he sold 160 acres of his land on Hunting Creek to William Arnold.14

     In September 1792, "the minutes provide that each member should bring yearly into the church 'some such donations of corn and wheat as they can best spare, the stocks to be deposited in the hands of the deacons.11'"

     On 9 December 1794, George Reeves of Wilkes County, North Carolina, sold to "William Petty, senior, of same county and state," 200 acres on Little Cub Creek for 100 pounds of tobacco, in Thomas Rogers line to Moravian line, John Greers line, William Gilreaths line, being condt. line between James Chaney & Reeves. This deed is important because it distinguishes him from his son.15

     In May 1795, "the minutes show that 'the members of the Church, taking into consideration the travels and fatigues of our minister, have agreed to the following donation' - the amounts give being stated in English money, pounds, shillings and pence, which all told at the current rate of exchange amounted to about fifty dollars."16

     On 1 February 1796, it was ordered that Betty Crane, orphan child of James Crane, deced, be bound to William Petty, senr. aged nine years at Wilkes County, North Carolina.17

     On 14 May 1796, Rev. William Petty and his son William were sent to assist in the constitution of Deep Ford, or Reddies' River, Church in Wilkes County in respose to a petition.18

     Between 1795 and 1799, he sold his land in North Carolina and moved to Clark County, Kentucky after September 1800, where he later died.

     Based on the evidence of the two daughters named in his will (Sarah Stevens and Hannah Ward) and the scandal of Sarah's elopement, it seems that this William Petty is the man who resided in Pittsylvania County, Virginia between 1773-1778, lived in Surry and Wilkes Counties, North Carolina before moving to Clark County, Kentucky.19

     On 1 October 1798, he sold his land on Cub Creek at Wilkes County, North Carolina.20

     In September 1800, Flat Rock Church lost William Petty in this year [when he relocated to Kentucky].

     "Although some believe William was attracted to Kentucky by the gigantic Baptist revival at Cane Ridge, Bourbon County, Kentucky, in 1801, it seems more probable that he accompanied or followed some of his married children to Clark County, where he died a few years later."20

     William Petty left a will dated on 1 May 1804 at Clark County, Kentucky, in which he names his wife, Lettie or Lettis, and the following children: Thomas Petty, youngest son; Francis Petty; Rhoda Cast; Elizabeth Dodson; Rachel Russel; Hannah Ward; Zachariah Petty; Wm. Petty; Randell Petty; John Petty; James Petty; Sarah Stevens; and, Lias Petty. The executors were his wife Little or Lettie and son, Thomas. Witnesses were Charles Tracey and Sarah Tracey.2

     He died before 27 May 1805 in Clark County, Kentucky.
     Find A Grave does not have a burial listing for him in Kentucky as of 29 Dec 2018.2

     His estate was probated on 27 May 1805 in Clark County, Kentucky.2

Tax Rolls

DatePropertyLocation
1780on John Wright's List with seven hundred acres of land, two slaves, four horses, sixteen cattle, and a valuation of 2,748 poundsSurry County, North Carolina8

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1790with two white males sixteen and upwards, three white males under sixteen, three white females and one slave. This means that four of his sons and two of his daughters had not yet married and left homeSalisbury District, Surry County, North Carolina21
1800with one free white male 16 through 25; one free white male 45 and over; one free white female 10 through 25; one free white female 26 through 44; and one free white female 45 and olderMorgan, Wilkes County, North Carolina22

Citations

  1. [S2986] Pettey, Harry, Medlin, Dorothy and Parks, Vivian. The Pettey's of East Texs (Longview: H.P., n.d.), page 32.
  2. [S2963] McGhee, Lucy Kate, abstractor. Historical Records of the Blue Grass Region of Kentucky Clark County - Winchester - Edition of Wills Formed From Fayette ad Bourbon Counties 1792, Fayette and Bourbon Counties from Virginia 1780 (Washington: L.K.M., n.a.), page 15, citing Will Book 1, page 41.
  3. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 33, gives the marriage date and place.
  4. [S3006] T. L. C. Genealogy, abstractor. Charlotte County, Virginia Deeds, 1771-1777 (Miami Beach, Florida: T. L.C.G., 1990), page 40; citing Deed Book 3, page 360.
  5. [S3022] Nance, Joanne Lovelace, abstractor. Charlotte County, Virginia 1765-1771 Deed Books 1 and 2 (Charlottesville: The N. W. Lapin Press, 1990), page 64, citing Deed #381, page 330.
  6. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 33.
  7. [S1107] Oaths of Allegiance - 1777 Pittsylvania County, Virginia, contributed by Cynthia Hubbard Headen, online at ( https://sites.rootsweb.com/~vapittsy/Oaths.html ), uploaded Febuary 1985, site verified as active 4 Jun 2019. Citing Virginia Magazine of Genealogy, series 1, vol. 23, no. 1, transcribed by Marian Dodson Chiarito.
  8. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 34.
  9. [S726] Hayes, Johnson J.. The Land of Wilkes (Wilkesboro: Wilkes County Historical Society, 1962), page 120.
  10. [S2993] Paschal, George Washington. History of North Carolina Baptists, II (North Carolina Baptist State Convention: North Carolina General Board, 1955), pages 240-241, 244, 250-251.
  11. [S2993] Paschal. Hist. of NC Baptists, II, page 209.
  12. [S2993] Paschal. Hist. of NC Baptists, II, pages 89, 153, 155.
  13. [S2993] Paschal. Hist. of NC Baptists, II, page 226.
  14. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, pages 35, 36.
  15. [S3007] Absher, Mrs. W. O., abstractor. Deed Book B-1, Wilkes County, North Carolina (1782-1797) (Wilkesboro: The Genealogical Society of the "Original" Wilkes County, n.d.), page 40; citing page 416.
  16. [S2993] Paschal. Hist. of NC Baptists, II, pages 209-210.
  17. [S2984] Absher, Mrs. W. O., abstractor. Wilkes County, North Carolina Court Minute Abstracts (1794-1797), IV (North Wilkesboro: Wilkes Genealogical Society), page 26.
  18. [S2993] Paschal. Hist. of NC Baptists, II, page 154.
  19. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, pages 34, 35.
  20. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 36.
  21. [S5519] "United States Census, 1790," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHK1-C8W ): accessed re-accessed 7 Aug 2019, William Petty, Surry, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 518, column 3, line line 29, NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 7; FHL microfilm 568,147.
  22. [S58] "1800 U. S. Federal Census," Wilkes County, North Carolina, Roll 33, page 57, line 21, William Petty sen household, digital image, citing National Archives microfilm M32. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  23. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 40.

William Eli Petty

M, #13009, b. 13 March 1764, d. 26 September 1834
FatherWilliam Petty1 b. 1730, d. b 27 May 1805

Family

Lucretia Wright b. 7 Jul 1765, d. 16 Aug 1842
Child
Last Edited18 Mar 2020
     
The Ancestry of William Petty

     With respect to William Petty, W. Frost writes:
     "Although other and better evidence in support of the father-son-relationship may yet be found, the following are sufficient to convince the writer of this sketch:
          1. The William Pettey who became a soldier of the Revolution in Surry County, North Carolina, at the age of sixteen would likely have been living with his parents; and the Reverend William Petty was the only Petty known to be living in Surry County of suitable age to have a sixteen year old son.
          2. The Reverend William Petty named a son William in his will; and none of the numerous other men by the name of William Petty fit so well into the pattern of this family.
          3. William Pettey married the daughter of one of the Reverend William Pettey's neighbors.
          4. Church history and traditions in Surry and Wilkes Counties support the father-son relationship.
          5. The only negative evidence which has been found is the lack of the use of 'Jr.' for William Pettey in public and family records; but this has the probable explanation that either or both of the men may have had a middle name which did not get into the records but which nevertheless precluded the correct use of 'Jr.' Even this has been offset to extent by the fact that 'senior' was applied to the Reverend William Petty's name in public records when he moved into Wilkes County, where his son was already established as a land owner and resident. Paschal's History of North Carolina Baptists is the only old record to say William Jr. However, a book published in 1962 states, 'among the sons of William Pettey, Sr. were Zachariah and William Jr.'"
[TT comment: middle names were extremely uncommon during the early lives of both of these men and common ONLY in the case of aristocratic families as which the Petty family would not have been considered to belong. Only children born well after the Revolution began to receive middle names in such families.]

     William Pettey, according to his own sworn statement in his application for a pension for his service in the American Revolution, was born either in Fauquier or in Stafford County, Virginia, March 13, 1764. He died September 26, 1834, according to his tombstone inscription, which bears also his birth date, which can be found along a road near Blutcher's Ford, Madison County, Alabama."

     The cited source states that William's mother was Elizabeth Moore.2

     There also is a problem with his middle name. I do not believe, nor do the authors of the cited book, that he actually had a middle name of Eli. In absolutely NO document signed by him or record about him of the period calls him anything except William Petty. The only exception being the note in Paschal's book wherein he is described as Jr. in a public record. The "confusion may have arisen over the name because of his son, Eli, who married his first cousin, Dianah Harrison Martin, and remained in the county long after his parents had left. There was also a grandson, Eli Williams Petty (1833-1854), son of their son, Zachariah Pettey."
     William Petty was born on 13 March 1764 in Fauquier County, Virginia Colony. In his pension application, William stated the county of his birth to been either Fauquier or Stafford County.3,4,5 William's surname also is spelled as Pettey.6

     In 1780, during the Revolution, he moved with his parents at the time they and the John Wright Family moved to Surry County, North Carolina.1

     He performed his Military Service in 1780 by serving for at least six months and probably longer as a North Carolina militiaman during the Revolutionary War. He was drafted into the army of General Rutherford C. Armstrong. Under Captain Absolom Bostick, his immediate commander, William Pettey marched from Surry County, North Carolina, as a draftee militiaman, through Salisbury, Cherau Hills, and somewhere in the neighborhood of Rugely's Mills where he joined General Gates' army. A few days after he was drafted, he was detached with about 300 men under the command of Major Elisha Isaacs to enforce General Sumpter whom he joined in the neighborhood of Camden and remained until his defeat there. He served about three months during this period [during which he would've seen Col. Samuel Watson].

     After General Sumpter was defeated, he engaged in scouting parties. He states in his pension application that he was also continually engaged in scouting parties while in the service, which at that time was considered dangerous and that he was frequently sent as a scout.

     Later, he went back into the regular army as a substitute for a man he did not even know. This time he was commanded by Major Francis Hargrove and Capt. P. Isbell. This campaign soon ended and he was then engaged in guarding the legislature of North Carolina until the close of the war.7,8

     After 1782, the Petty and the Wright families moved to Wilkes County, North Carolina.1

     William, 18, married Lucretia Wright, 17, daughter of John Wright III and Ann Williams, on 25 January 1783.9,10,11

     On 24 October 1787, William purchased a tract of 250 acres of land in Wilkes County on both sides of Warrior Creek from Spilsby Tribble, on Moravian Creek and Blood Creek, for 150 pounds of tobacco as a resident of Wilkes County.12,13,14

     On 30 July 1788, he served on a jury in a case called State vs. Reubin Smether in which case the defendant was found guilty at Wilkes County, North Carolina.15

     Circa 1789, the 1849 diary of Nancy Riley Clark refers to Rev. William Pettey as having baptized his wife's sister, Francis Wright, and her husband, Gerard Riley, in the Yadkin River this year.16

     On 28 April 1789, he served on a jury in the case entitled Berriman Shumate vs. John Shumate at Wilkes County, North Carolina.17

     "Only two boys and one girl had been born to William and Lucretia by 1790; but John Wright Pettey, born 28 Feb 1791, evidently was counted when the enumeration was extended into 1791 in counties where it had not been completed in December 1790."18

     On 26 April 1791, he was ordered to attend County Court as a juryman at Wilkes County, North Carolina.19

     On 24 July 1791, he served on a Grand Jury at Wilkes County, North Carolina,19he, again, served on the Grand Jury on 23 April 1792, at Wilkes County.20

     On 31 July 1792, he served on the jury in a case entitled William Hoggs vs. William Ferguson in which the defendant was found guilty at Wilkes County, North Carolina.21

     On 30 October 1792, he served on the jury in a case entitled Mark Harden vs. Thomas Robins at Wilkes County, North Carolina.22

     On 21 July 1793, he served on the jury in a case entitled Reuben Smither vs. John Cargile at Wilkes County, North Carolina.22

     On 3 August 1793, he was ordered, with others, to view road from Wilkes Court House to Robert Eppersons branch at Wilkes County, North Carolina.23

     On 6 November 1793, he served on a jury on a case entitled Gerrend Donaphan vs. James Lloyd at Wilkes County, North Carolina.24

     On 11 February 1794, he, among others, was ordered to attend the next county court as jurors at Wilkes County, North Carolina.25

     On 7 August 1794, he was ordered to attend as a Juror at Morganton Superior Court on the first of September at Wilkes County, North Carolina.26

     Like his father, William Petty Jr. was a Baptist minister.27

     On 4 May 1795, he as ordered to attend the next County Court as a juryman at Wilkes County, North Carolina.28

     On 3 August 1795, he served on the Grand Jury at Wilkes County, North Carolina.29

     On 3 May 1796, he served as a juryman in a case entitled John Allen vs. Andrew Bryan at Wilkes County, North Carolina.30

     On 14 May 1796, Rev. William Petty and his son William were sent to assist in the constitution of Deep Ford, or Reddies' River, Church in Wilkes County in respose to a petition.31

     On 3 August 1796, he served as a juryman in a case entitled Andrew Baird vs. Richard Owen in Wilkes County.

     Also, in the same court session, he served on the jury in a case entitled Rachel Young vs. John Nisbit. It was a complicated property case after which the jury found the right of property vested in John Nisbet.32

     On 4 May 1797, he served as a juryman in a case entitled John Parsons vs. John Livingston - Certiorari at Wilkes County, North Carolina.33

     On 1 October 1798, William Petty conveyed to William Fletcher 200 acres of land for 100 pounds of tobacco on Cub Creek, Thomas Rodgers line, adjacent the Moravian line, John Greers line, William Gilreaths line, condt. line between James Chaney and Reeves.34

     On 19 February 1800, William added another 100 acres on Warrior Creek as a grant from the State of North Carolina.35

     On 10 December 1803, he received North Carolina Grant 2451 for 100 acres on the watershed of Warrior Creek and his own line in Wilkes County, North Carolina.36

     On 1 May 1804, he most probably is the Wm. Petty named in his presumptive father's will.37

     In 1809, John Wright Jr. and his brother, Daniel Wright, Lucy's brothers, were the first family members attracted to land in Alabama. Other family members bought land there later in 1810-1813.18

     On 4 January 1811, William witnessed his son, Eli's, purchase of 97 acres of land from Joel Branham for $100 (worth .$1,356.56 in 2012 dollars) at Wilkes County, North Carolina.38

     On 4 February 1811, he sold to his son, Eli Pettey, for $200 two tracts of land: 75 acres on Caleys Creek part of original survey 148 granted Benjamin Branham; and 75 acres on Richard Owens line and said William Pettys corner condt. line made between Joel Branham and Joseph Patton. However, no record can be found for his acquisition of this land.39,40

     In April 1814, William Petty was elected Deacon of Zion Hill in Wilkesboro, at Wilkes County, North Carolina.41

     It's possible that William went to present day Madison County, Alabama, in order to select a tract of land - still legally claimed by the Creek Indians who had lost the war with the settlers.18

     On 15 December 1815, William bought 1/4 section in Madison County, Alabama, for which he began making payments on this date. This amounts to 160 acres of land which had formerly belonged to Josiah Blackwell.42

     In 1816, "William Petty, junior, was pastor of Zion Hill Church in Wilkes County, and in the Yadkin Association of that year served on the Committee on Foreign Missions."43

     In 1817, William and Lucy moved to Madison County, Alabama. The distance was about 313 miles and it probably took them about 19 days to make the journey. Most of William's daughters and sons made the trip to Alabama together except three or four of the oldest who had already established homes and remained in Wilkes County for awhile. Benjamin, who made the trip, later returned to Wilkes County to make his home.

     Nancy Pettey Hickerson was 33, but she probably did not make the trip. Eli was 32 and he continued to live in Yadkin Valley. Lazurus was 29 and John Wright was 27, but he did not come until 1825.44,45

     In 1821, William purchased 160 acres of land at Madison County, Alabama.46

     In July 1822, he purchased the personal estate of Major John Cook at Madison County, Alabama.47

     In 1823, he bought his first slaves and received his patent (final certificate #1011).
He bought more land in 1824 and another 160 acres in 1832.48

     On 9 September 1828, State of Alabama}      Know all men by thee presents that I William Petty of the County and
Madison County }      State aforesaid for and in consideration of the natural love and affection which I have for my grandchildren Amelia Martin Petty, Margretta W. Petty and Sarah L. Petty, daughters of my son Lazarus Petty of the state of Georgia have this day given granted bargained and sold and by these do give grant bargain and sell unto them my said grandchildren the following negro slave Ann aged ten years in witness whereoff (sic) I have this ninth day of September 1828 set my hand and seal
                    Wm Pettey signed (seal)
Witness:      Daniel H. Pettey
                    Gideon Northcutt
State of Alabama}      Personally appeared before me Thomas Brandon Clerk of the county court of
Madison County }      said county Daniel H. Petty one of the subscribing witnesses to the foregoing deed of Gift and being first duly sworn depose and saith that he heard William Petty whose name is subscribed to the said deed of Gift acknowledge the signing sealing and delivery of the same for the purpose therein contains on the day of its date and said deponent further states that he subscribed his name as a witness thereto in the present of the said William Pettey and in the presence of the other subscribing witness Given under my hand and seal at office in Huntsville this 9th day of September 1828           Thos. Brandon Clk (seal)
The foregoing Deed of Gift was delivered unto this office to be recorded the 9th day of September 1828 and is dully done the same day and year           Thos Brandon Clk at Madison County, Alabama.49

On 29 October 1832, State of Alabama
          Madison County
     On [this date] personally appeared in open court before the Judge of the Circuit Court now sitting William Petty a resident of the county of Madison and State of Alabama aged sixty eight years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress [?] June 7th 1832.

     That he entered the service of the United States under Genl Rutherford Colonel Armstrong and Capt. Absolom Bostick who was his immediate commander he marked from Surry County N. Carolina as a drafted militiaman through Salisbury from then to Cheraw Hills and somewhere in the neighborhood of Rugely's Mills he joined Genl Gates' army with which he remained until a few days before the engagement in which Gates was defeated he was detached with about 300 men under the command of Major Elisha Isaacs to inform [unsure of last work] Genl Sumpter whom he joined in the neighborhood of Camden and remained until hie defeat - in this campaign he was in service about three months - after the close of which he was engaged in scouting parties until he again entered the service as a substitute for a man who name he has entirely forgotten - he however recollects that he was commanded by Major Francis Hargrove and Capt. Pinkston [?] after the close the last campaign he was engaged in guarding legislature of N. Carolina he was almost continually engaged in scouting parties which at that time was considered as very frustrating [unsure of previous word] service - he served more than six months but how long he does not know - during the first campaign he thinks Major Wingate Lewis and Major John Armstrong were in the same tour and in the regular service - he further states that he was frequently sent as express he has no documentary evidence of his service. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity [?] - the present, and disclaims that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state
Sworn to and subscribed,           William [his mark] Petty
the day and year aforesaid
in open court Seal [?] Clerk

     Interrogatories propounded to William Petty an applicant for a pension for service in the War of the Revolution
          Intg 1st . . When and in what year were you born?
          Ans. I was born in the county of Fauquier or Stafford State of Virginia I do not know which - on the 13th day of March 1764 -
          2nd . . Have you any record of your age and if so where is it?
          . I have a record in my family bible which I made myself from what my parents had told me -
          3rd . . Where were you living when called into service, where have you lived since the revolutionary war, and where do you live now
          Ans. I lived in Surry County N. Carolina when I entered the service - and continued to live there until the close of the revolutionary war - I then moved to Wilkes County N. C. and lived there until the year 1817 when I moved to Madison County Alabama Territory now state of Alabama and have lived there ever since and still do -
          4th . . How were you called into service; were you drafted, did you volunteer, or were you a substitute, and if so substitute for whom?
          Ans: I was once drafted and once a substitute but have entirely forgotten for whom - he was a stranger to me when I engaged as his substitute - I knew him afterward, but cannot recollect his name - I was at that time 16 years of age -
          5th . . State the names of com of the regular officers who were with the troops when you served; such continental and militia regiments - as you can recollect, and the general circumstances of your service -
          Ans. I cannot state now particularly than I have done in my declaration to which I refer in answer to the interrogatory -
          6th . . Did you ever receive a discharge from the service, and yes by whom was it given, and what has become of it?
          Ans. I never did received any discharge - it was at that time considered of no value -
          7 State the names of persons to whom you are known in your present neighborhood, and who can testify as to your character for veracity, and their belief of your service as a soldier of the Revolution.
          Drury Allen & Saml Chapman are present - any others to whom I am known I belive wish to do the same
                     [signed] Wm Petty

State of Alabama
Madison County      This day personally appeared in open court Daniel Wright who being duly sworn saith that he is well acquainted with William Petty who has subscribed and sworn to the foregoing declaration. That he has believes the facts therein stated are true - that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood to have been a soldier of the revolution and this deponent concurs in that opinion - This Deponent further states that he resided in Surry County N. Carolina during the war of the revolution and knows that the said William Petty was frequently in service as a soldier in that war
Sworn to and subscribed
this 29th day of October 1832            [signed] Danl Wright

     We Drury M. Allan & Saml Chapman of Madison and Danl B. Turner residing in the county - also residing in said county hereby certify that we are well acquainted with William Petty who has subscribed and sworn to the foregoing declaration that we believe him to be sixty eight years of age - that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides, to have been a soldier of the revolution and that we concur in that opinion
Sworn to and subscribed                Drury M. Allen
this 29 day of October 1832                D. B. Turner

In open court [?] [?]

     I William Eddins, a clergyman residing in the county of Madison & state of Alabama do hereby certify that I am well acquainted with William Petty who has subscribed and sworn to the above declaration that I believe him to be sixty eight years of age; that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides, to have been a soldier of the revolution & that I concur in that opinion
Sworn to & Subscribed
the day & year aforesaid                 William Edd [seems longer surname] Senior

State of Alabama
Madison County
     And the said court doth hereby declare its opinion after the investigations of this matter & after putting the interrogatories presented by the War department that the same [?] applicant was a revolutionary soldier [?] as he states. And this court further certifies that he appears to the satisfaction of the court William Eddins senior who has deposed the [?] certificate is a Clergyman resident in this county of Madison State of Alabama & That Drury M. Allen & Samuel Chapman & D. B. Turner who have also deposed this [?] certificate are residents in the county of Madison state of Alabama are credible [?] [?] these statements as entitled to audit
                W. I. Adair

State of Alabama
Madison County      I Lemuel [?] clerk of the circuit court of said County do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the [?] proceedings that [?] in the month of the application of William Petty for a pension.

     In testimony whereof I [?] [?] set my hand and seal this 30th day of October 1832.

     The application was accepted and Wm. Petty was given a pension of $20 for his service in 1780 as a private for a period of six months.
War Department
Revolutionary Claim.

     I certify that in conformity with the Law of the United States, of the 7th June, 1832, William Petty of the State of Alabama who was a Private in the war of the Revolution is entitled to receive Twenty dollars per annum, during his natural life, commencing on the 4th of March, 1831, and payable semi-annually, on the 4th of March, and 4th of September, in every year.
      Given at the War Office of the United States, this
      21st day of February
      one thousand eight hundred and thirty-three
                [signed] Lew Cop
                Secretary of War

Examined and
Countersigned
      J. L. Edwards.50

     William Eli Petty left a will dated on 26 April 1834 in Madison County, Alabama. "I William Pettey of Madison County and the State of Alabama being of Sound mind and Judgement do make constitute and ordain this my last Will and Testament In Manner and form as follows That is to say
     Item 1st     Whereas I have already given to my Daughter Nancy Hickerson the Sum of two hundred and fifty dollars, also to my son Eli Pettey the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars and likewise to my son Lazarus Pettey the sum of three hundred dollars, and also to my son John Wright Pettey the amount of three hundred dollars, as also to my son Zachariah Pettey the sum of four hundred dollars, also to my Daughter Amelia Carleton the amount of three hundred dollars, also to my son William Thornton Pettey the amount of three hundred dollars and I have also given to my son James William Pettey the amount of three hundred dollars Also my son Thomas More Pettey the sum of three hundred dollars, also to my son Benjamin Franklin Pettey the amount of four hundred fifty dollars also to my Daughter [Eliza] Eastland to the amount of three hundred Dollars.
     Item now It is my Will that my beloved wife Lucretia Pettey at my death shall have the mansion house and as much Land where I now live as it is no smaller that her handy negroes can cultivate, also the houshold ( )furniture and as much of the live Stock and as many of the plantation tools as she may desire, also three negroes, viz, Lewis, Richman and Sally during her natural life, at her death to go to my legal heirs.
     Item It is also my will that my youngest son Daniel Harrison Pettey at my death shall have the plantation I now live on except the part I have willed to my beloved wife which she is to hold during her natural life and at her death to fall back to my said son Daniel.
     Item I give to my son John Wright Pettey in trust a tract of land of eighty acres being and lying the County and State before mentioned for the use and benefit of my Daughter Amelia Carlton and her increas and to be appropriated to no other man to have and to hold said tract of Land whereon my said Daughter Amelia now lives
     Item It [?] desire that a forty acre tract of Land which I now hold Lying the County of Madison Joining John Wright and Zachariah Pettey be sold at my death on a credit one, two and three years
     Item It further my wish my Executor shall sell a certain tract of Land of eight acres which I hold Jackson County in said State at private sale to best advantage for my heirs
     Item It is my desire that all my property not otherwise disposed of in this my last will at my death shall be sold by my executors hereafter to be named on a twelve months credit and to be divided amongst all my legal heirs after making each share hereafter given equal to five hundred dollars except my Daughter Amelia Carlton whom I conceive has received her five hundred dollars and afterwards the Ballance of surplus funds to be equally divided amongst my legal heirs except the part that will go to my Daughter Amelia Carlton which I wish to be [p?] to John Wright Pettey for her use
Lastly I appoint my son John Wright Pettey and Zachariah Pettey Executors of this my last will and testament - In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal this twenty sixth day of April in the year of our Lord 1834.
Signed seal and acknowledge in the                              Wm Pettey (Seal)
presence of     Jon Wright - Sr
          Dan Wright
          Augustin Spain.51

     William Eli Petty died on 26 September 1834 at age 70 in Madison County, Alabama,52,53,54,5 and was buried in Petty Gravesite, Madison County, Alabama.
     "On the side of a road near Blutcher's Ford in Madison County is a tombstone with the following inscription: 'IN MEMORY OF WILLIAM PETTEY, BORN MAR. 13 1764, DIED SEPT. 26 1834.'

     The burial site is on Macon Road, near Huntsville, Alabama. Two graves are located at the roadside near a cornfield where there is a monument.55

     His estate was probated on 26 January 1835 in Madison County, Alabama. "The State of Alabama
          Orphans Court of Madison County the 26th day of January 1835
     The Last Will and Testament of William Pettey deceased was this day duly presen by the oaths of John WRight Senr and Augustus Spain two of the Subscribing witnesses to said Willl and by the Deposition of Daniel Wright the other Subscribing witness hereto ordered to be recorded (see Minute Book no Page 150) Pursuant to said Order said Last Will was duly recorded the 11th day of March 1835
                    Rich B Purdon Clerk CG.51

     William Eli Petty's estate was inventoried and appraised on 19 February 1835 at Madison County, Alabama, The inventory and appraisal was $6,393.50 (worth $146,949.78 in 2013 dollars.)51

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1790with two free white males 16 and over; three free white males under 16; and, two free white females. There were no slavesWilkes County, North Carolina56
1800with three free white males under 10; two free white males 10 through 15; one free white male between 26 and 44; two free white females under 10; one free white female 10 through 15; and one free white female 126 through 44 years of ageMorgan, Wilkes County, North Carolina57
1810as William Petty Esq. with a household consisting of three white males under 10; one white male 10 through 15; two white males between 16 and 25; one white male 45 and older; one white female under 10; 1 white male between 10 and 15; and one white female 45 or older and seven slavesWilkesboro, Wilkes County, North Carolina58
1830with one white male between 15 and 19; one white male between 20 and 29; one white male between 60 and 69 (himself); and, one white female between 60 and 69 (his wife). It also held: two male slaves under 10; one male slave between 10 and 23; two male slaves between 24 and 35; one male slave between 36 and 54; one female slave between 10 and 23; and, three female slaves between 36 and 54. The total number of slaves were ten and the entire household numbered fourteenMadison County, Alabama59

Citations

  1. [S2986] Pettey, Harry, Medlin, Dorothy and Parks, Vivian. The Pettey's of East Texs (Longview: H.P., n.d.), page 40.
  2. [S3777] Barr, James Houston. Lt. Colonel Nathaniel Pope, c1610-1660 - Ancestor of Washington and Governors (Louisville, Kentucky: J.H.B., 2013), page 32.
  3. [S2966] William Petty, pension application S17016; digital images, Ancestry.com's Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com, page 6, Affidavit of, imaged from Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives microfilm publication M804.
  4. [S3034] Chumbley, George W.. "Middle Tennessee's Unpublished Bible Records: Pettey Family Bible," Middle Tennessee Journal of Genealogy & History, vol. 9, no. 4 (Spring 1996): page 172, quoting from page 678 of the family Bible. The Holy Bible, Containing the Old and New Testaments: Together with the Apocrypha. Translated out of the Original Tongues, and with the Former Translations Diligently Compared and Revised. By the Special Command of his Majesty King James I, of England. Philadelphia: Printed and Published by Mathew Carey, No. 122 Market-Street, 1812. The accuracy of the transcription was compared and found to be a true copy of Connie McKay, Notary Public, whose commission expires 10/28/80. This bible was formerly owned by Daniel Harrison Petetey and copi8ed in 1959 by Mrs. Ida Stimpson Miller of Dallas about a year before her death at 88. Mrs. Miller was Daniel Harrison Pettey's granddaughter.
  5. [S3843] "Tennessee Bible Records", contributed by Tennessee State Library and Archives, online at https://tnsos.net/TSLA/Bibleproject/ , website address verified 13 Jul 2019, accessed 28 Jul 2014. This is a search website address where a search and index is available.
  6. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 38.
  7. [S2966] William Petty, pension application S17016, http://www.fold3.com, pages 4-10.
  8. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 41.
  9. [S2966] William Petty, pension application S17016, http://www.fold3.com, Affidavit of Lucy Petty on page 14.
  10. [S3034] Chumbley. "Pettey Family Bible", page 172, quoting page 677 of the family Bible.
  11. [S3843] "TN Bible Recds.," online https://tnsos.net/TSLA/Bibleproject/ , accessed 28 Jul 2014.
  12. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 43; citing Wilkes County Deed Book C-1, page 34.
  13. [S3008] Absher, Mrs. W. O., abstractor. Deed Book C-1, Wilkes County, North Carolina, Deeds and Grants - 1782-1803 (Wilkesboro: The Genealogical Society of the "Original" Wilkes County, n.d.), page 4; citing page 34.
  14. [S2982] Absher, Mrs. W. O. and Sidden, Mrs. W. C., abstractors. County Court Minutes, Wilkes County, North Carolina (25 January 1785 - 1 November 1788), II (North Wilkesboro: Wilkes Genealogical Society), page 32.
  15. [S2982] Absher and Sidden. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, II, page 40.
  16. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 42.
  17. [S2983] Absher, Mrs. W. O., abstractor. Wilkes County, North Carolina Court Minute Abstracts (1789-1793), III (North Wilkesboro: Wilkes Genealogical Society, 1975), page 4.
  18. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 43.
  19. [S2983] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, III, page 22.
  20. [S2983] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, III, page 31.
  21. [S2983] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, III, page 35.
  22. [S2983] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, III, page 38.
  23. [S2983] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, III, page 49.
  24. [S2983] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, III, page 50, where his surname is spelled Pettey.
  25. [S2984] Absher, Mrs. W. O., abstractor. Wilkes County, North Carolina Court Minute Abstracts (1794-1797), IV (North Wilkesboro: Wilkes Genealogical Society), page 3.
  26. [S2984] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, IV, page 9.
  27. [S2981] Hickerson, Thomas Felix. Echoes of Happy Valley: Letters and Diaries Family Life in the South, Civil War History (Chapel Hill: T. F. H., 1962), page 175 . Thomas Felix Hickerson was Kenan Professor Emeritur, University of North Carolina.
  28. [S2984] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, IV, page 18.
  29. [S2984] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, IV, page 21.
  30. [S2984] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, IV, page 30.
  31. [S2993] Paschal, George Washington. History of North Carolina Baptists, II (North Carolina Baptist State Convention: North Carolina General Board, 1955), page 154.
  32. [S2984] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, IV, pagse 30 and 35, where his surname is spelled Pettie.
  33. [S2984] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Court Minutes, IV, page 49.
  34. [S3008] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Deed Bk C-1, page 29; citing pages 261-262.
  35. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 43; citing Wilkes County Deed Book F-1, page 232.
  36. [S3009] Absher, Mrs. W. O., abstractor. Deed Book F-1, Wilkes County, North Carolina, (1778-1807) (Wilkesboro: The Genealogical Society of the "Original" Wilkes County, n.d.), page 31; citing page 232.
  37. [S2963] McGhee, Lucy Kate, abstractor. Historical Records of the Blue Grass Region of Kentucky Clark County - Winchester - Edition of Wills Formed From Fayette ad Bourbon Counties 1792, Fayette and Bourbon Counties from Virginia 1780 (Washington: L.K.M., n.a.), page 15, citing Will Book 1, page 41.
  38. [S3010] Absher, Mrs. W. O., abstractor. Deed Book G-H, Wilkes County, North Carolina, (Deeds and Grants - 1782-1815) (North Wilkesboro: The Genealogical Society of the "Original" Wilkes County, n.d.), page 24; citing page 163.
  39. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 43; citing Wilkes County Deed Book G and H, page 162.
  40. [S3010] Absher. Wilkes Co., NC Deed Bk G-H, page 24; citing Deed Book G-H, page 162.
  41. [S726] Hayes, Johnson J.. The Land of Wilkes (Wilkesboro: Wilkes County Historical Society, 1962), page 250.
  42. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, pages 4344; citing Patent Tract Book, Madison County, Alabama Records, vol. 195, page 89.
  43. [S2993] Paschal. Hist. of NC Baptists, II, page 132.
  44. [S2968] Frost, W. W. The Frosts and Related Families of Bedford County, Tennessee (Knoxville: W. W. F., 1962), page 96; accessed 15 Aug 2011 . Mr. Frost states that the information on the Wright and related families for four generations comes from "Some Descendants of Richard Wright, Gentleman of London, England, and Northumberland, Virginia," published in 1919 Tyler's Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine, Volume 1, pages 127 and 177 and from "the Washington-Wright Connection and Some Descendants of Major Francis and Anne (Washington) Wright, published in three volumes in 1923 as The Washington Ancestry . . and Forty Related Families." Both the article and the book were written by Charles Arthur Hoppin a genealogist of note.
  45. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 44.
  46. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 4, citing Madison County, Alabama Deed Book H, page 372.
  47. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 4, citing Madison County, Alabama Volume 163, page 23, Probate Record 2, page 356.
  48. [S2986] Pettey, Medlin and Parks, Pettey's of East TX, page 4, citing Alabama records, Vol. 195, page 90.
  49. [S3142] Madison County, Alabama Deed Records, Vols L-M 1827-1830, FHL Film 1,305,811, microfilm of original records in the Madison County courthouse, Huntsville, Alabama.
  50. [S2966] William Petty, pension application S17016, http://www.fold3.com, page 17; accessed 14 Aug 2011.
  51. [S3848] "Alabama, Probate Records, 1809-1985," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-9B3T-BQP?i=422&wc=M6DK-R38%3A220032201%2C220586201&cc=1925446 ), William Petty, 1834; citing Madison County Probate Records 1832-1837, vol. 6-7, images 423-424 of 717 (pages 61-62): accessed 27 Apr 2014.
  52. [S2966] William Petty, pension application S17016, http://www.fold3.com, page 22; accessed 14 Aug 2011.
  53. [S3034] Chumbley. "Pettey Family Bible", page 172, quoting from page 679 of the family Bible.
  54. [S3035] Anonymous. "Alabama Genealogical Records Committee DAR Records 1928-1929: Bible Record of Zachariah Pettey," Navarro Leaves and Branches, vol. 28, no. 1 (February 2005): page 16, citing page 117 on Alabama Genealogical Records Committee DAR Records.
  55. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Feb 2012, memorial page for William Eli Petty (1764-1834) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by judy chapman, maintained by Dmcclellan7; citing Petty Gravesite, Madison County, Alabama. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  56. [S5519] "United States Census, 1790," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XHKB-T4G ): accessed re-accessed 7 Aug 2019, Wm Petty, Wilkes, North Carolina, United States; citing p. 164, column 3, line 22, NARA microfilm publication M637, (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 7; FHL microfilm 568,147.
  57. [S58] "1800 U. S. Federal Census," Wilkes County, North Carolina, Roll 33, page 57, line 19, William Petty household, digital image, citing National Archives microfilm M32. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.
  58. [S5546] "United States Census, 1810," index and images, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, FamilySearch ( https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XH2V-CYY ): accessed 23 Jul 2018), William Petty, Wilkesborough, Wilkes County, North Carolina, line 1, page 880, NARA microfilm publication M252 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.), roll 43; FHL microfilm 337,916.
  59. [S683] "1830 United States Federal Census," Madison County, Alabama, Roll 4, page 81, image 44, line 23, William Pettey household, digital image, citing National Archives microfilm M19. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.

Lucretia Wright

F, #13010, b. 7 July 1765, d. 16 August 1842
FatherJohn Wright III1,2 b. c 1731, d. 30 Oct 1789
MotherAnn Williams3 b. c 1735, d. Oct 1825

Family

William Eli Petty b. 13 Mar 1764, d. 26 Sep 1834
Child
Last Edited17 Oct 2018
     Lucretia Wright was born on 7 July 1765, daughter of John Wright III and Ann Williams, in Fauquier County, Virginia Colony.4,5

     Lucretia Wright moved with her parents to Surry County, North Carolina Colony, circa 1775 .6

     Lucretia, 17, married William Eli Petty, 18, son of William Petty, on 25 January 1783.7,8,9

     They moved to Wilkes County, North Carolina.10

     Circa 1817, they moved to a location near New Market, Madison County, Alabama.3

     On 30 May 1835, Lucy Petty appeared in court as the widow of her husband, a Revolutionary War pensioner:
     Know all men by these presents that I Lucy Petty of Madison County in the State of Alabama, widow and relict of William Pettey a Revolutionary Army Pensioner of the United States, do hereby constitute and appoint Theophilus Lacy my true and lawful attorney, for me and in my name to receive from the Agent of the United States for paying pensions in Decatur, State of Alabama, the pension of the said William Petty from the 4th day of September 1833 to the 26th day of September 1834, due to me in consequence of the death of said William Petty. Witness my hand and seal this 30th day of May 1835.
     Sealed and delivered
     in presence of                       Lucy [her mark] Petty
     Danl H. Petty

The State of Alabama
     Madison County      Be it known that on the 30th day of May 1835 before the subscriber a justice of the peace in and for said county, personally appeared Lucy Pettey, above named and acknowledged the foregoing power of attorney to be her [?] and deed. In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand the day and year last above mentioned.
                     John J. Coleman J. P.

     I Richard B. Purdon, Clerk of the county Court of Madison County in the State of Alabama certify that John J. Coleman is a magistrate as above, and [torn] signature, purporting to be his, is genuine.
     In Testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed my seal of Office and subscribed my name this 1st day of June in the year 1835
                 Rich B. Purdom, Clerk of County court of Madison County, in the state of Alabama.

The State of Alabama
     Morgan County      Be it known that on the 16th day of June 1835 before the subscriber a Justice of the peace in and for said county, personally appeared Theophilus Lacy the a attorney named in the foregoing power of attorney and made oath that the same was not given by reason of any sale, transfer or mortgage of the pension, or arrears of pension wherein authorized to be received by him.
                           Thos. Lacy
Sworn and subscribed the day and year last above mentioned before me
               [unreadable signature]
     Signature of the Magistrate (John J. Coleman J. P. ) Jur. peace

The State of Alabama
     Madison County      I, Richard B. Purdom, Clerk of the County Court of the County and State aforesaid, do hereby certify that John J. Coleman is a Justice of the peace in and for said County, Duly commissioned and qualified: that his commission was dated on the 23rd day of March 1835, and will expire as soon after the first Monday in March 1838, as his [?] shall be duly qualified and that his signature above written is genuine.
                 Given under my hand and the seal
                of said county this 1st day of June 1835.
                      Richd B. Purdom Clerk.11

     Lucretia Petty died on 16 August 1842 at age 77 in Madison County,12,13,5 and was buried at Petty Gravesite, Madison County, Alabama,
     "Beside it [her husband's stone] is another with the inscription:
          'IN MEMORY OF LUCY PETTEY, BORN JUL. 7, 1765, DIED AUG. 16, 1842.'.14

Census and Occupation

DateEnumeration and OccupationLocation
1840with one white female between 70 and 79 (herself); one free colored person under 10; two male slaves under 10; one male slaves between 24 and 35; one male slaves between 36 and 54; and, one female slave between 24 through 35. There were a total of five slaves and the household held a total of seven personsMadison County, Alabama15

Citations

  1. [S2981] Hickerson, Thomas Felix. Echoes of Happy Valley: Letters and Diaries Family Life in the South, Civil War History (Chapel Hill: T. F. H., 1962), page 175, calling him Capt. John Wright . Thomas Felix Hickerson was Kenan Professor Emeritur, University of North Carolina.
  2. [S3031] Linn, Jo White and Clark, Edith Montcalm, abstractors. Surry County, North Carolina Will Abstracts, Vols. 1-3, 1771-1827 (Salisbury: J.W.L., 1974), page 77; citing Will Book 2, page 160a.
  3. [S3777] Barr, James Houston. Lt. Colonel Nathaniel Pope, c1610-1660 - Ancestor of Washington and Governors (Louisville, Kentucky: J.H.B., 2013), page 32.
  4. [S3034] Chumbley, George W.. "Middle Tennessee's Unpublished Bible Records: Pettey Family Bible," Middle Tennessee Journal of Genealogy & History, vol. 9, no. 4 (Spring 1996): page 172, quoting from page 678 of the family Bible. The Holy Bible, Containing the Old and New Testaments: Together with the Apocrypha. Translated out of the Original Tongues, and with the Former Translations Diligently Compared and Revised. By the Special Command of his Majesty King James I, of England. Philadelphia: Printed and Published by Mathew Carey, No. 122 Market-Street, 1812. The accuracy of the transcription was compared and found to be a true copy of Connie McKay, Notary Public, whose commission expires 10/28/80. This bible was formerly owned by Daniel Harrison Petetey and copi8ed in 1959 by Mrs. Ida Stimpson Miller of Dallas about a year before her death at 88. Mrs. Miller was Daniel Harrison Pettey's granddaughter.
  5. [S3843] "Tennessee Bible Records", contributed by Tennessee State Library and Archives, online at https://tnsos.net/TSLA/Bibleproject/ , website address verified 13 Jul 2019, accessed 28 Jul 2014. This is a search website address where a search and index is available.
  6. [S3188] Beverly, Ralph and Catherine. Colonial Families of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 3 (Lewes: Colonial Roots, 2007), page 198.
  7. [S2966] William Petty, pension application S17016; digital images, Ancestry.com's Fold3 (http://www.fold3.com Affidavit of Lucy Petty on page 14, imaged from Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files, National Archives microfilm publication M804.
  8. [S3034] Chumbley. "Pettey Family Bible", page 172, quoting page 677 of the family Bible.
  9. [S3843] "TN Bible Recds.," online https://tnsos.net/TSLA/Bibleproject/ , accessed 28 Jul 2014.
  10. [S2986] Pettey, Harry, Medlin, Dorothy and Parks, Vivian. The Pettey's of East Texs (Longview: H.P., n.d.), page 40.
  11. [S2966] William Petty, pension application S17016, http://www.fold3.com, Affidavit of Lucy Petty in William's Petty's file.
  12. [S3034] Chumbley. "Pettey Family Bible", page 172, quoting from page 679 of the family Bible.
  13. [S3035] Anonymous. "Alabama Genealogical Records Committee DAR Records 1928-1929: Bible Record of Zachariah Pettey," Navarro Leaves and Branches, vol. 28, no. 1 (February 2005): page 16, citing page 117 on Alabama Genealogical Records Committee DAR Records.
  14. [S2702] Find A Grave. Database and images; accessed 27 Feb 2012, memorial page for Lucy Petty (1765-1842) at memorial page..., photograph of grave by judy chapman, maintained by judy chapman; citing Petty Gravesite, Madison County, Alabama. This site consists of data submitted by individuals supposedly of cemetery internments, often from grave memorials or cemetery records and many times supplemented by other information, generally without identification of the sources except when a tombstone photo is included.
  15. [S1026] "1840 United States Federal Census," Madison County, Alabama, Role 13. Page 139, image 45, line 11, Lucretia Petty household, digital image, citing National Archives microfilm M704. ProQuest's HeritageQuest Online, formerly accessed through participating libraries. HeritageQuest moved their census data to Ancestry.com in 2015.